Monday, July 09, 2007

Seven Wonders of the World Temple of Artemis

Seven Wonders of the World Temple of Artemis, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-matpc-12977]TITLE: Jerash, pillars of Temple of Artemis CALL NUMBER: LC-M33- 13570-B[P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-matpc-12977 (digital file from original photo) No known restrictions on publication.

MEDIUM: 1 negative : safety film ; 4 x 5 in. CREATED, PUBLISHED: 1946 July. CREATOR: Matson Photo Service, photographer.
Digital ID: matpc 12977 Source: digital file from original photo Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-matpc-12977 (digital file from original photo) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (166 kilobytes)

NOTES: Caption from catalog: taken July 11, 1946. Gift; Episcopal Home; 1978. Title and date from: photographer's logbook: Matson Registers, v. 2, [1940-1946]. SUBJECTS: Jordan--Gerasa (Extinct city). FORMAT: Safety film negatives.

PART OF: G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (digital file from original photo) matpc 12977 hdl.loc.gov/matpc.12977, CARD #: mpc2005009414/PP

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-matpc-12977]

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Seven Wonders of the World Temple of Artemis, Martin HeemskerckFantastic reconstruction of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, depicted here in a hand-coloured engraving by Martin Heemskerck. The Temple of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus was one of the "Seven Wonders" of the Ancient World.
Heemskerck's drawing, from which this engraving was made, dates from the 16th century and is entirely imaginery. Heemskerck had visited Rome. He had seen and drawn St Peter's Basilica under construction. He would have seen buildings in the new Renaissance style, reviving the Classical Orders of ancient Rome. He has tried to imitate that style in his reconstruction of what the Temple of Ephesus might have looked like. It was common practice to show the latest style in building within artworks of a different period, for example the Queen of Sheba might be shown coming out the door of a Renaissance palace.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Temple of Artemis

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries, including Germany.The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

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