Monday, March 22, 2010

The Three Bears

The Three BearsThree Bears, of mild and mannerly appearance, Meandering toward them Tim and Tilly saw, "I beg you will pardon seeming interference," The biggest Bear said, offering his paw.

"Oh, that's all right," said Tim, " we 're glad you met us, You see, we're idly wandering round the Zoo."

"Yes," said the Bear, "and, fearing you 'd forget us, We purposely sought out this interview. For I 'm sure you are aware That a self-respecting bear
Desires good conversation when it may be, I'm not unknown to fame, Big Bruin is my name, Allow me to present my wife and baby."
His wife was middle-sized and grizzled slightly, Her woolly hair was sort of yellow-buff, She bowed respectfully and most politely, And murmured softly, "I am Mammy Muff."

The little bear was very fat and cunning. "Here," said his father, "make your manners, Bub!"

The baby bear with grinning face came running, Bowed awkwardly, and said, "I'm Tiny Cub."

"You're a darling," Tilly said, Patting Tiny's woolly head, "And I 'm very glad with bears to get acquainted, For I've always thought them bold, Fierce and dreadful to behold,— But you're really not as black as you've been painted."


A smile crept o'er Big Bruin's woolly features. "Have ypu had that impression, Tim?" he said, "Though I can't answer for my fellow creatures, My family's exceedingly well-bred; And we have come to hear your conversation.

In order that we may improve our mind. We'll gladly listen now to your oration, If it is in your hearts to be so kind."

But Tilly then cried out, "'Tis the other way about! And what we want is just to hear your story, And if you 're willing now, We beg you 'll tell us how You reached your present state of fame and glory."

Title: Mother Goose's menagerie, Authors: Carolyn Wells, Peter Newell. Illustrated by: Peter Newell. Publisher: Noyes, Platt, 1901. Original from: Harvard University
Digitized: Dec 18, 2008. Length: 111 pages.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1901 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

1 comment:

suruha said...

How cool! Thank you!

Su

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