Monday, December 31, 2007

American Staffordshire Terrier

American Staffordshire TerrierI, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

The American Staffordshire Terrier's muscled build and protective instinct should make strangers beware, yet with their own family they are devoted, gentle and loving. A common question regarding the American Staffordshire Terrier is, "How is this breed different from the American Pit Bull Terrier?". In the eyes of the United Kennel Club, they are the same breed. American Staffordshire Terrier:

American Staffordshire Terrier From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The American Staffordshire Terrier is a medium sized dog that ranges from 40 to 50 cm (16 to 19 inches) at the withers, and weighs from 26 to 30 kg (57 to 67 pounds).

The dog is of square build, and gives the impression of great strength, agility, and grace for there size. They should be stocky, not long-legged or racy in outline. The chest is deep and broad, but should not be too wide. The neck should be strong, and well arched.

The coat is short and glossy. Any color, solid, parti, or patched is permissible, but all white, more than 80 per cent white, black and tan, and liver not to be encouraged.

These dogs should be courageous, tenacious, friendly, extremely attentive, and extraordinarily devoted.

Bred to be extremely friendly towards humans, American Staffordshire Terriers are not natural guard dogs. A lack of overly protective and/or aggressive behavior, accompanied by fearlessness, is generally a good sign. Such a dog is stable with children, and easily cared for by pet sitters.

These dogs learn quickly from the subtlest of our behaviors. They are thus not only highly responsive during training, but also pick up good habits for example, being house-trained. This can become a problem when an owner unknowingly allows the dog to pick up bad behaviors.

The American Staffordshire Terrier is a loyal,companion dog.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, American Staffordshire Terrier

Freedom Calendar 12/29/07 - 01/05/08 and Champagne Bottles and Fuel cells help make noisy, hot generators a thing of the past

Sunday, December 30, 2007

NASA - Hypersonic X-43A Scramjet Aircraft

NASA - Hypersonic X-43A Scramjet AircraftThis image (captured from animation video) illustrates the X-43A research vehicle alone after separation from the Pegasus booster. (LaRC Photo # EL-2000-00531) High Resolution Image
The X-43A was a small experimental research aircraft designed to flight-demonstrate the technology of airframe-integrated supersonic ramjet or "scramjet" propulsion at hypersonic speeds above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound. Its scramjet engine is an air-breathing engine in which the airflow through the engine remains supersonic.

Still Images, Audio Files and Video

NASA still images, audio files and video generally are not copyrighted. You may use NASA imagery, video and audio material for educational or informational purposes, including photo collections, textbooks, public exhibits and Internet Web pages. This general permission extends to personal Web pages.

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services. If a NASA image includes an identifiable person, using the image for commercial purposes may infringe that person's right of privacy or publicity. Dryden Aircraft Photo Collection

It's Official. X-43A Raises the Bar to Mach 9.6

Guinness World Records recognized NASA's X-43A scramjet with a new world speed record for a jet-powered aircraft - Mach 9.6, or nearly 7,000 mph. The X-43A set the new mark and broke its own world record on its third and final flight on Nov. 16, 2004.

In March 2004, the X-43A set the previous record of Mach 6.8 (nearly 5,000 mph). The fastest air-breathing, manned vehicle, the U.S. Air Force SR-71, achieved slightly more than Mach 3.2. The X-43A more than doubled, then tripled, the top speed of the jet-powered SR-71.

"Mach Number" was named after the Austrian physicist Ernst Mach. Mach 1 is the speed of sound, which is approximately 760 miles per hour at sea level. An airplane flying less than Mach 1 is traveling at subsonic speeds, faster than Mach 1 would be supersonic speeds and Mach 2 would be twice the speed of sound. Hypersonic X-43A Takes Flight

Freedom Calendar 12/29/07 - 01/05/08 and Champagne Bottles and Fuel cells help make noisy, hot generators a thing of the past

Saturday, December 29, 2007

Champagne Bottles

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Champagne (wine) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Champagne is a sparkling wine produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of wine to effect carbonation. It is produced exclusively within the Champagne region of France, from which it takes its name. While the term "champagne" is used by some makers of sparkling wine in other parts of the world, numerous countries limit the use of the term to only those wines that come from the Champagne appellation. In Europe, this principle is enshrined in the European Union by Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status. Other countries, such as the United States have recognized the exclusive nature of this name, yet maintain a legal structure that allows longtime domestic producers of sparkling wine to continue to use the term "Champagne" under specific circumstances.

Wines from the Champagne region were known before medieval times. Churches owned vineyards and monks produced wine for use in the sacrament of Eucharist. French kings were traditionally anointed in Reims and champagne wine was served as part of coronation festivities.

Kings appreciated the still, light, and crisp wine, and offered it as an homage to other monarchs in Europe. In the 17th century, still wines of Champagne were the wines for celebration in European countries. The English were the biggest consumers of Champagne wines.

The first commercial sparkling wine was produced in the Limoux area of Languedoc about 1535. Around 1700, sparkling Champagne, as we know it today, was born. There is documentary evidence that sparkling wine was first intentionally produced by English scientist and physician Christopher Merrett at least 30 years before the work of Dom Perignon who, contrary to legend and popular belief, did not invent sparkling wine.

Although the French monk Dom Perignon did not invent champagne, it is true he developed many advances in the production of this beverage, including holding the cork in place with a wire collar to withstand the fermentation pressure. It is believed champagne was created accidentally, yet others believe that the first champagne was made with rhubarb but was changed because of the high cost.

Champagne is mostly fermented in two sizes of bottles, standard bottles (750 mL), and magnums (1.5 L). In general, magnums are thought to be higher quality, as there is less oxygen in the bottle, and the volume to surface area favors the creation of appropriately-sized bubbles. However, there is no hard evidence for this view. Other bottle sizes, named for Biblical figures, are generally filled with Champagne that has been fermented in standard bottles or magnums.

Sizes larger than Jeroboam (3.0 L) are rare. Primat sized bottles (27 L) - and as of 2002 Melchizedek sized bottles (30 L) - are exclusively offered by the House Drappier. The same names are used for bottles containing wine and port; however Jeroboam, Rehoboam and Methuselah refer to different bottle volumes. On occasion unique sizes have been made for special occasions and people, the most notable example perhaps being the 20 fluid ounce / 60 cL. bottle (Imperial pint) made specially for Sir Winston Churchill by Pol Roger. In order to see a side-by-side comparisen, see this site: Champagne sizes

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Champagne (wine)

Ron Paul New TV Ad: ‘Defender of Freedom’ VIDEO and Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) and Ames Laboratory researchers solve fuel-cell membrane structure conundrum

Friday, December 28, 2007

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)Western Diamondback Rattlesnake USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE) which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Crotalus atrox From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake, Texas diamond-back, Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Adults commonly grow to 120 cm in length. Specimens over 150 cm are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

The color pattern generally consists of a dusty looking gray-brown ground color, but it may also be pinkish brown, brick red, yellowish, pinkish or chalky white. This ground color is overlaid dorsally with a series of 24-25 dorsal body blotches that are dark gray-brown to brown in color. The first of these may be a pair of short stripes that extend backwards to eventually merge. Some of the first few blotches may be somewhat rectangular, but then become more hexagonal and eventually take on a distinctive diamond shape. The tail has 2-8 (usually 4-6) black bands separated by interspaces that are ash white or pale gray. There is a postocular stripe that is smoky gray or dark gray-brown and extends diagonally from the lower edge of the eye across the side of the head. This stripe is usually bordered below by a white stripe running from the upper preocular down to the supralabials just below and behind the eye

Found in the United States from central Arkansas and southeastern California, south into Mexico as far as northern Sinaloa, Hidalgo and northern Veracruz. Disjunct populations exist in southern Veracruz and southeastern Oaxaca. The type locality given is "Indianola" (Indianola, Calhoun County, Texas, USA).

In the United States it occurs in the following states: central and western Arkansas, Oklahoma excluding the northeast, north-central region and the panhandle, Texas excluding the northern panhandle and the east, southern and central New Mexico and Arizona, extreme southern Nevada, and in southeastern California on either side of the Chocolate Mountains. Records from extreme southern Kansas (Cowley and Sumner Counties) may be based on a natural occurrence of the species, while multiple records from near Kanopolis Reservoir in Ellsworth County seem to indicate a viable (although isolated) population.

In Mexico it occurs in the following states: Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, extreme northeastern Baja California (state), northern Sinaloa, northeastern Durango, Zacatecas, most of San Luis Potosí, northern Veracruz, Hidalgo and Querétaro. Specimens have been collected in the mountains, northwest of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca on numerous occasions, but have not been reported there since the 1940s.

This species has also been reported on a number of islands in the Gulf of California, including San Pedro Mártir, Santa María (Sinaloa), Tíburon and the Turner Islands.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Crotalus atrox

Benazir Bhutto Biography and Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Explosives at the microscopic scale produce shocking results VIDEO

Thursday, December 27, 2007

Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum)

Gila Monster USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE)
which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Gila Monster From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Gila Monster (pronounced /ˈhiːlə/, HEE-la), Heloderma suspectum, is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It is a heavy, slow moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2 feet) long, and is the most venomous lizard native to the USA. Its skin has the appearance of black, pink, orange, and yellow beads, laid down in intricate patterns. These beads are small bony plates that form scales, and are known as osteoderms. Until very recently, it was thought to be one of only two species of venomous lizard, the other being its close relative the Mexican beaded lizard. However research at the University of Melbourne, Australia and Pennsylvania State University has revealed that in fact many lizards in the iguanian and monitor families have venom-producing glands.

The name "Gila monster" refers to the Gila River Basin in Arizona. The generic name for Heloderma is from the Greek words Helos coming from the head of a nail or stud, and derma for skin, therefore Heloderma means studded skin. Suspectum comes from Cope's notion that the lizard might be venomous due to the grooves in the teeth.

Unlike snakes which use hollow upper teeth (fangs), the Gila monster injects venom into its victim through grooves in the teeth of its lower jaw. The teeth are loosely anchored, which allows them to be broken off and replaced throughout their lives. The Gila monster produces only small quantities of its neurotoxic venom, which is secreted into the lizard's saliva. By chewing its prey, however, it tries to put as much of the venom into the bloodstream of its victim as possible. The Gila monster's bite is normally not fatal to humans (there are no confirmed reports of fatalities), but it can bite quickly and holds on tenaciously. When Gila Monsters bite, they hold on tightly and chew. This helps them work their venom into the bite. Gila Monster bites are not deadly, but it is important to see a doctor if bitten.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Gila Monster

President Bush calls to members of the Armed Forces and Benjamin Franklin and Using carbon nanotubes to seek and destroy anthrax toxin and other harmful proteins VIDEO

Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)

Texas Horned LizardTexas Horned Lizard USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service
Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE) which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Texas horned lizard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) is one of 14 North American species of spikey-bodied reptiles called horned lizards. The Texas species ranges from Colorado and Kansas to northern Mexico, and from southeastern Arizona to Louisiana and Arkansas. Texas is the heart of its range. There are also isolated, introduced populations in the Carolinas, Georgia, and northern Florida.

The horned lizard is popularly called a "horned toad," "horny toad", or "horned frog," but it is neither a toad nor a frog. The popular names come from the lizard's rounded body and blunt snout, which give it a decidedly toad-like or frog-like appearance.(Phrynosoma literally means "toad-bodied." Cornutum means "horned.") The lizard's horns are extensions of its cranium and are composed of true bone.

The Texas horned lizard is the largest-bodied and most widely distributed of 8 species in the United States. It grows to a maximum length of 4-6 inches. Although its coloration generally serves as camouflage against predation, when threatened by a predator, a horned lizard puffs up its body to cause its spiny scales to protrude, making it difficult to swallow. The Texas horned lizard, along with at least three other species, also has the ability to squirt an aimed stream of blood from the corners of the eyes for a distance of up to 5 feet. This not only confuses would-be predators, the blood is mixed with a chemical that is foul-tasting to canidae predators such as wolves, coyotes, and domestic dogs.

About 70% of the Texas horned lizard's diet is made up of harvester ants, though they supplement these with termites, beetles, and grasshoppers. In recent years, the Texas horned lizard has declined in about 30% of its range, though there is some indication it may be making a comeback. The decline is usually blamed on overuse of pesticides and the spread of non-native, but highly aggressive and fiercely territorial, Brazilian fire ants. Both eradicate harvester ant colonies, destroying the horned lizard's principal source of food. The Texas horned lizard is now a protected species and it is illegal to take, possess, transport or sell them without a special permit.

Some Native American peoples regarded horned lizards as sacred. The animal is a common motif in the art of many Native Americans in the Southwestern U.S. and in Mexico.

The horned lizard is the state reptile of Texas and, as the "horned frog", is the mascot of Texas Christian University (TCU).

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Texas horned lizard

President Bush calls to members of the Armed Forces and Benjamin Franklin and Using carbon nanotubes to seek and destroy anthrax toxin and other harmful proteins VIDEO

Tuesday, December 25, 2007

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin: First American DiplomatThis image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

In this case Creator/Artist Name: Joseph Siffred Duplessis. Date of birth/death 1725 1802. High Resolution Image‎ (2,134 × 2,868 pixels, file size: 2.36 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg)
Benjamin Franklin, the most distinguished scientific and literary American of his age, was the first American diplomat. He served Benjamin Franklin Picturefrom 1776 to 1778 on a three-man commission to France charged with the critical task of gaining French support for American independence. French aristocrats and intellectuals embraced Franklin as the personification of the New World Enlightenment.

His likeness appeared on medallions, rings, watches, and snuffboxes, while fashionable ladies adopted the coiffure a la Franklin in imitation of the fur cap he wore instead of a wig. His popularity and diplomatic skill--along with the first American battlefield success at Saratoga--convinced France to recognize American independence and conclude an alliance with the thirteen states in 1778. Franklin presented his credentials to the French court in 1779, becoming the first American Minister (the 18th American century equivalent of ambassador) to be received by a foreign government.

Franklin’s home in Passy, just outside Paris, became the center of American diplomacy in Europe. When Thomas Jefferson succeeded Franklin in 1785, the French Foreign Minister, Vergennes asked: "It is you who replace Dr. Franklin?" Jefferson replied, "No one can replace him, Sir; I am only his successor." Benjamin Franklin: First American Diplomat, 1776-1785

Benjamin Franklin From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most important and influental Founding Fathers of the United States. He was a leading author, political theorist, politician, printer, scientist, inventor, civic activist, and diplomat. As a scientist he was a major figure in the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As a political writer and activist he, more than anyone, invented the idea of an American nation, and as a diplomat during the American Revolution, he secured the French alliance that helped to make independence possible.

Franklin was famous for his curiosity, his writings (popular, political and scientific), his inventions, and his diversity of interests. As a leader of the Enlightenment, he gained the recognition of scientists and intellectuals across Europe. An agent in London before the Revolution, and Minister to France during the war, he, more than anyone else, defined the new nation in the minds of Europe.

His success in securing French military and financial aid was a great contributor to the American victory over Britain. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the iron furnace stove (also known as the Franklin stove), a carriage odometer and a musical instrument known as the armonica. He was an early proponent of colonial unity. Many historians hail him as the "First American."

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Benjamin Franklin

Monday, December 24, 2007

Leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis)

Leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis)High Resolution Image File size: 195 KB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg). Dimensions: Screen: 1083px x 730px. Print: 7.22 x 4.87 inches. Resolution: 150 dpi (mid, presentation quality). Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Leopard tortoise. Alternative Title: (Geochelone pardalis). Creator: Stolz, Gary M.
Source: WO5628-007. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain). Subject: Animals, Kenya, Reptiles, Wildlife.

Leopard Tortoise From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Leopard tortoise(Geochelone pardalis) is a large and attractively marked tortoise which has a wide distribution in sub-Saharan Africa, including recorded localities in southern Sudan, Ethiopia, Eastern Africa (including Natal), Zambia, Botswana, Namibia, Angola and Southwest Africa. This chelonian is a large, grazing species of tortoise that favours semi-arid, thorny to grassland habitats.

It is, however, also found in some regions featuring a higher level of precipitation, although some leopard tortoises have been found in rainier areas. In both very hot and very cold weather they may dwell in abandoned fox, jackal, or anteater holes. Leopard Tortoises do not dig other than to make nests in which to lay eggs. Not surprisingly, given its propensity for grassland habitats it grazes, extensively upon mixed grasses.

It also favours the fruit and pads of the prickly pear cactus (Opuntia sp.), succulents and thistles. It grows to quite a respectable size, with adults reaching 16 - 18 inches (40 - 50 cm) and 40 pounds (18 Kg). Large examples may be 60 cm (over 2 feet) long and weigh about 80 lbs. They generally have a life span of 50 years.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Leopard Tortoise

Direct Evidence That Bioclocks Work By Controlling Chromosome Coiling and Quantum Computers superconducting circuit and Nanotube-producing bacteria show manufacturing promise

Sunday, December 23, 2007

Quantum Computers superconducting circuit

artificial atom superconducting circuitOptical micrograph showing an "artificial atom" made with a superconducting circuit. The red arrow points to the heart of the qubit -- the Josephson junction device that might be used in a future quantum computer to represent a 1, 0, or both values at once.

Credit: Ray Simmonds/NIST High Resolution Image

Use of NIST Information: These World Wide Web pages are provided as a public service by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). With the exception of material marked as copyrighted, information presented on these pages is considered public information and may be distributed or copied.
Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

If they can be built, quantum computers—relying on the rules of quantum mechanics, nature’s instruction book for the smallest particles of matter—someday might be used for applications such as fast and efficient code breaking, optimizing complex systems such as airline schedules, much faster database searching and solving of complex mathematical problems, and even the development of novel products such as fraud-proof digital signatures.

Superconducting circuits are one of a number of possible technologies for storing and processing data in quantum computers that are being investigated for producing qubits at NIST, UCSB (University of California, Santa Barbara) and elsewhere around the world. Research using real atoms as qubits has advanced more rapidly thus far, but superconducting circuits offer the advantage of being easily manufactured, easily connected to each other, easily connected to existing integrated circuit technology, and mass producible using semiconductor fabrication techniques. A single superconducting qubit is about the width of a human hair. Two qubits can be fabricated on a single silicon microchip, which sits in a shielded box about 1 cubic inch in size. Scientists Entice Superconducting Devices To Act Like Pairs of Atoms

Bush radio address 12/22/07 full audio, text transcript and Northern Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora aurora) and Ultrafast optical shutter is switched entirely by laser light

Saturday, December 22, 2007

Northern Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora aurora)

Northern Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora aurora)File size: 1.40 MB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg), Dimensions: Screen: 3593px x 2400px. Print: 11.98 x 8.00 inches. Resolution: 300 dpi (high, print quality) Depth: Full Color High Resolution Image

Primary Metadata: Title: Red legged frog. Alternative Title: (Rana aurora aurora)
Creator: Hayes, Marc P. Source: WO5410-26. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general). Subject: California.

Northern Red-legged Frog From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Northern Red-legged Frog, Rana aurora aurora, is a protected species of amphibian, whose range is the coastal region stretching from Northern California to southwest British Columbia. As a member of the genus Rana, this species is considered a true frog, with characteristic smooth skin and a narrow waist. This frog requires still waters for breeding and is rarely found at any great distance from its breeding ponds or marshes.

Rana aurora aurora adults may attain a length of eight centimeters; they have a dark facial mask and a characteristic light stripe along the jawline. The Northern Red-legged Frog has long, powerful legs well adapted to significant leaps; in fact its proximate species, R. draytonii, is considered to be that depicted by Mark Twain, in the famed tale of the Leaping Frog of Calaveras County. It is one of two amphibian species classified as Red-legged Frog, the other species being termed California Red-legged Frog; however, the latter species is found primarily from Marin County southerly to Baja California. These two genetically distinct species are believed to intergrade in the counties of Marin and Sonoma. In some systems of taxonomy, this species is classified as Rana aurora aurora.

The Northern Red-legged Frog is found in every coastal county of California from Mendocino County northward and including coastal Oregon. While it occurs primarily in the Northern California coastal mountain ranges, it is not found above an elevation of 1200 meters. It also occurs somewhat less commonly in the southern Cascade Range. The species is thought to intergrade with Rana draytonii in Marin County and Sonoma County, California, but has been observed as far south as San Mateo County.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Northern Red-legged Frog

Tom Tancredo Quits Race VIDEO and New Year's Fireworks and Professor Strauf's research is Nature Photonics’ cover article

Friday, December 21, 2007

New Year's Fireworks

New Year's FireworksHigh Resolution Image‎ (2,592 × 1,944 pixel, file size: 2.19 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

Bratislava; New Year 2005; FireWorks. Author: --Ondrejk 23:26, 21 Mar 2005 (UTC)

I, the copyright holder (Ondrejk) of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible:
I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Fireworks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A fireworks event (also called a fireworks show or pyrotechnics) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. Fireworks competitions are also regularly held at a number of places. The biggest fireworks event in the world is held in Madeira, Portugal at the New Years' Eve celebrations, as referred in the Guinness World Records.

The earliest unequivocal documentation of fireworks dates back to 12th century China, where they were first used to frighten away evil spirits with their loud sound ("bian pao") and also to pray for happiness and prosperity.

Eventually, the art and science of firework making developed into an independent profession of its own. In ancient China, pyrotechnicians (firework-masters) were well-respected for their knowledge and skill to mount dazzling displays of light and sound.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Fireworks

White House Press Briefing by Dana Perino 12/19/07 VIDEO PODCAST and Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and Tethered to chip, energy supply that drives sperm could power 'nanobot'

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Snakes and Reptiles

Snakes and ReptilesHigh Resolution Image File size: 917 KB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg). Dimensions: Screen: 1596px x 2108px. Print: 7.98 x 10.54 inches. Resolution: 200 dpi. Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Reptiles 28. Alternative Title: (none). Creator: Hines, Bob
Source: WO-ART-83-CDHines1. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general). Subject: rattlesnake den, diamondback rattlers, pygmy rattlesnake, worm snake, fox snake, garter snake, green turtle, snakes, line art, illustration, illustrations.
Reptile From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reptiles are air-breathing, cold-blooded vertebrates that have scaly bodies as opposed to hair or feathers; they represent an intermediate position in evolutionary development between amphibians and warm-blooded vertebrates, the birds and mammals. They are tetrapods and amniotes whose embryos are surrounded by an amniotic membrane, and members of the class Sauropsida inhabiting every continent with the exception of Antarctica.

The majority of reptile species are oviparous (egg-laying) although certain species of squamates are capable of giving live birth. This is achieved, either through ovoviviparity (egg retention), or viviparity (offspring born without use of calcified eggs). Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals with some providing initial care for their hatchlings.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Reptile

White House Press Briefing by Dana Perino 12/19/07 VIDEO PODCAST and Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and Tethered to chip, energy supply that drives sperm could power 'nanobot'

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)High Resolution Image File size: 1.48 MB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg) Dimensions: Screen: 3658px x 2400px. Print: 12.19 x 8.00 inches. Resolution: 300 dpi (high, print quality) Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Alligator. Alternative Title: (Alligator mississippiensis) Creator: Bailey, Dick
Source: WO2953Highlights. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: reptile.

Alligator From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. The name alligator is an anglicized form of the Spanish el lagarto ("the lizard"), the name by which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the alligator. There are two living alligator species: the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese Alligator (Alligator sinensis).

Alligators are characterized by a wider snout than crocodiles. Both living species also tend to be darker in color, often nearly black but color is very dependent on the water. Algae-laden waters produce greener alligators; alligators from waters with a lot of tannic acid from overhanging trees are often darker (although the Chinese alligator has some light patterning.) Also, in alligators only the upper teeth can be seen with the jaws closed, in contrast to true crocodiles, in which upper and lower teeth can be seen. However, many individuals bear jaw deformities which complicate this means of identification.


The eyes of a large alligator will glow red and those of a smaller one will glow green when a light is shined on them. This fact can be used to find alligators in the dark.

An average American alligator's weight and length is 800 lbs (360 kg) and 13 feet (4 m) long. According to the Everglades National Park website, the largest alligator ever recorded in Florida was 17 feet 5 inches long (5.3 m). The largest alligator ever recorded in Alabama measured 12 feet 10 inches (3.7 m). The largest alligator ever recorded measured 19 feet 2 inches (5.8 m) and was found on Marsh Island, Louisiana. Few of the giant specimens were weighed, but the larger ones could have exceeded a ton in weight. The Chinese Alligator is smaller, rarely exceeding 7 feet (2 m) in length.

An alligator's lifespan is usually estimated in the range of 50 years or more. A specimen named Muja has resided in the Belgrade Zoo in Serbia since 1937, making it at least 70 years old. Another specimen, Čabulītis, in Riga Zoo, Latvia died in 2007 being more than 72 years old.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Alligator

Secretary Condoleezza Rice Remarks With Iraqi Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari VIDEO PODCAST and The Tragic Prelude. John Brown and UCLA researchers discover cancer cells 'feel' much softer than normal cells

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

The Tragic Prelude. John Brown

The Tragic Prelude. John BrownName: John Brown Tragic Prelude.

Description: The Tragic Prelude. John Brown. Copy of mural by John Steuart Curry in the State Capitol in Topeka, KS, ca. 1937-42. (National Park Service) Exact Date Shot Unknown NARA FILE #: 079-CWC-3F-10 WAR & CONFLICT BOOK #: 115. Released to Public High Resolution Image
Source: Defense Visual Information Center Still HDSN9901774. Date: Date Shot: 1 Jan 1937. Author: John Steuart Curry, for the Creator, Department of the Interior. National Park Service. Civil War Centennial Commission.

Permission: This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Copyright.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

other_versions: The Tragic Prelude. John Brown. Copy of mural by John Steuart Curry in the State Capitol in Topeka, Kansas, circa 1937-42., 1957 - 1965. ARC Identifier: 520060. Local Identifier: 79-CWC-3F(10). Access Restrictions: Unrestricted. Use Restrictions: Unrestricted.

Bleeding Kansas From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a sequence of violent events involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro-slavery "Border Ruffians" elements that took place in Kansas Territory and the western frontier towns of the U.S. state of Missouri between roughly 1854 and 1858 attempting to influence whether Kansas would enter the Union as a free or slave state. The term "Bleeding Kansas" was coined by Horace Greeley of the New York Tribune. The events in Bleeding Kansas directly presaged the American Civil War.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 created the territory and provided the cause of the ensuing guerilla warfare. Enshrined in the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which nullified the Missouri Compromise, is the principle now known as "popular sovereignty", an idea heavily supported by U.S. Senator Stephen A. Douglas, chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories. Popular sovereignty was an attempt to offer concessions to the Southern states through making possible the expansion of slavery into both western and northern territories. Popular sovereignty, also known in Kansas Territory as squatter sovereignty, was first developed by U.S. Senator Lewis Cass.

The act established that the question of the expansion of slavery in the new states of Kansas and Nebraska would be decided by the inhabitants of the states. Initially, it was assumed that few slaveowners would attempt to settle in Kansas and make it a slave state, because it was thought to be too far north for profitable exploitation of slaves. However, the eastern portion of Kansas along the Missouri river was as suitable for slave-based agriculture as the nearby 'black belt' of Missouri in which most of Missouri's slaves were held.

The settlement and formation of the state government in Kansas became highly politicized beyond the borders of the territory. There were a number of reasons for this. Missouri, a slave state, was uniquely exposed to free states, with Illinois and Iowa bordering it on the east and north. Most parts of Missouri held very few slaves, and slaveowners were a very small proportion of the state's population. If Kansas entered the Union as a free state, Missouri would have free soil on three sides. Since manumission, abolition activity, and escape were all more common in the border south, the existence of nearby free soil was a threat to Missouri slaveowners.

Also, in the Senate, each state is apportioned two senate seats. A rough balance had existed between free and slave states, but each addition of a state threatened to tip the balance, disrupting the status quo.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Bleeding Kansas

Monday, December 17, 2007

Wagner Chrismas Tree

Wagner Chrismas Tree
Wagner Chrismas Tree
David Wagner to me, Dec 16, 2007 [Tree.gif] Hi, I made this Christmas tree clip art pic (attached) and I'd like to release it to the public domain. Thanks very much.

Thank You very much David

I, the creator of this work, (David Wagner) hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (David Wagner) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Image Properties Tree_3.gif (Linked Image): white background Width 539 Height 760 Size of file 5.26 kb

Image Properties Tree_4.gif (Linked Image): Transparent Background Width 539 Height 760 Size of file 5.26 kb

Computer graphics From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Computer graphics is a sub-field of computer science and is concerned with digitally synthesizing and manipulating visual content.
Although the term often refers to three-dimensional computer graphics, it also encompasses two-dimensional graphics and image processing. Computer graphics is often differentiated from the field of visualization, although the two have many similarities.

Computer graphics broadly studies the manipulation of visual and geometric information using computational techniques. Computer graphics as an academic discipline focuses on the mathematical and computational foundations of image generation and processing rather than purely aesthetic issues.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Computer graphics

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Sunday, December 16, 2007

Griffith Park Observatory

Griffith Park ObservatoryDescription: Griffith Observatory in Griffith Park, Los Angeles, California. Date: December 17, 2006. Author: Serouj.

Permission: Public domain. I, (Serouj) the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide.
In case this is not legally possible: I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law. High Resolution Image‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixel, file size: 1.58 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

Griffith Observatory From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Griffith Observatory is located in Los Angeles, California, United States. Sitting on the south-facing slope of Mount Hollywood in L.A.'s Griffith Park, it commands a view of the Los Angeles Basin, including downtown Los Angeles to the southeast, Hollywood to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. The observatory is a popular tourist attraction that features an extensive array of space- and science-related displays.

The land on which the observatory stands was donated to the City of Los Angeles by Col. Griffith J. Griffith in 1896. In his will, Griffith donated funds to build an observatory, exhibit hall, and planetarium on the donated land. Construction began on June 20, 1933 using a design developed by architect John C. Austin based on preliminary sketches by Russell W. Porter. The observatory and accompanying exhibits were opened to the public on May 14, 1935. In its first five days of operation the observatory logged more than 13,000 visitors. Dinsmore Alter was the museum's director during its first years. A wild fire in the hills came dangerously close to the observatory on May 10, 2007

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Griffith Observatory

Presidential Podcast 12/15/07 and New Year's Baby and Blue dye could hold the key to super processing power

Saturday, December 15, 2007

New Year's Baby

New Year's BabyDescription: The inscription is a Latin elegaic couplet: sum novus ut pura puer ortus virgine Christus. Sic tibi sit foelix hic novus annus. homo. I am as new as Christ child born of a virgin pure, Mortal, may your new year be just as happy and sure.

Source: self-made scan from Paul Heitz Neujahrswunsche des XV. Jahrhunderts (Strassburg 1900), #18. Date: 16th century woodcut, Original in Prague, Adalbert Ritter von Lanna Collection. Author: Kenmayer
This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

From the scanner: I, the copyright holder (Kenmayer) of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible:
I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

New Year's Day From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New Year's Day is the first day of the year, in the Gregorian calendar, falling exactly one week after Christmas Day of the previous year. In modern times, it is January 1. In most countries, it is a holiday. It is a holy day to many of those who still use the Julian calendar, which includes followers of some of the Eastern Orthodox churches, and is celebrated on January 14 of the Gregorian calendar due to differences between the two calendars. It is usually celebrated with Fireworks,

March 15 in the old Roman Calendar, New Year's Day first came to be fixed at January 1 in 153 BC, when the two Roman consuls, after whom - in the Roman calendar - years were named and numbered, began to be chosen on that date, for military reasons. However in AD 525, Dionysius Exiguus set the start of the Julian calendar at March 25[citation needed] to commemorate the Annunciation of Jesus; a variety of Christian feast dates were used throughout the Middle Ages to mark the New Year, while calendars often continued to display the months in columns running from January to December in the Roman fashion.

Among the 7th century druidic pagans of Flanders and the Netherlands, it was the custom to exchange gifts at the New Year, a pagan custom deplored by Saint Eligius (died 659 or 660), who warned the Flemings and Dutchmen, "[Do not] make vetulas, [little figures of the Old Woman], little deer or iotticos or set tables [for the house-elf, compare Puck] at night or exchange New Year gifts or supply superfluous drinks [another Yule custom]." The quote is from the vita of Eligius written by his companion Ouen.

Most countries in Western Europe officially adopted January 1 as New Year's Day somewhat before they adopted the Gregorian calendar. This is sometimes called Circumcision Style, because this was the date of the Feast of the Circumcision, being the eighth day counting from 25 December.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, New Year's Day

Lt. Gen. James B. Peake (Ret.), M.D Biography and Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tenere) and Fatigue effects in silicon

Friday, December 14, 2007

Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tenere)

Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tenere)Title: Coral Snake. Alternative Title: (Micrurus fulvius tenere) Creator: Goldman, Luther C. Source: WO-416 Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. High Resolution Image

Contributor: DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights:(public domain). Audience: (general). Subject: reptile. snake. coral.
This image is a work of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain. For more information, see the FWS copyright policy Which s reproduced below.

Most of the images on our Web pages (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) are in the "public domain," which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Coral snake From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The coral snakes are a large group of elapid snakes that can be divided into two distinct groups, New World coral snakes and Old World coral snakes. There are three genera among New World coral snakes that consist of over 65 recognized species.

Coral snakes are most notable for their red, yellow/white, and black colored banding. Several nonvenomous species have similar coloration, however, including the Scarlet Kingsnake and the Milk Snake. In some regions, the order of the bands distinguishes between the non-venomous mimics and the venomous coral snakes, inspiring some folk rhymes — "Red and yellow, kill a fellow, red and black, venom lack". However, this only reliably applies to coral snakes in North America: Micrurus fulvius, Micrurus tener, and Micruroides euryxantus, found in the south and eastern United States. Coral snakes found in other parts of the world can have distinctly different patterns, and can even have red bands touching black bands, have only pink and blue banding, or have no banding at all.

Most species of coral snake are small in size. North American species average around 24" in length, but specimens of up to 60" or slightly larger have been reported. Aquatic species have flattened tails, to act as a fin, aiding in swimming.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Coral snake

Pearl Harbor Remembered and Mulberry Street NYC circa 1900 and 'High Q' NIST nanowires may be practical oscillators

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Mulberry Street NYC circa 1900

Mulberry Street NYC c1900Digital ID: det 4a31829. Source: digital file from intermediary roll film. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-1584 (color film copy transparency) , LC-USZC4-4637 (color film copy transparency) , LC-USZCN4-45 (color film copy neg.)

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (672 kilobytes)

Additional versions and related images: Digital ID: cph 3g04637. Source: color film copy transparency Medium resolution JPEG version (71 kilobytes) Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (229 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (65 megabytes)

This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See this page for further explanation. Most of the images in the Detroit Publishing Company Collection are in the public domain.

These inages however may not be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case 1948, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

TITLE: Mulberry Street, New York City. CALL NUMBER: LOT 12006, p. 79 [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZC4-1584 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZC4-4637 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZCN4-45 (color film copy neg.)

MEDIUM: 1 photomechanical print : photochrom, color. CREATED/PUBLISHED: [ca. 1900] RELATED NAMES: Detroit Publishing Co., publisher.

NOTES: In album prepared by Detroit Photographic Co. to use as a catalog in its office. For black-and-white copy photo from very similar view, use negative D401-12683. Detroit Publishing Co., no. 53641. Gift; State Historical Society of Colorado; 1955.

FORMAT: Photochrom prints Color. PART OF: Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from intermediary roll film) det 4a31829. (color film copy transparency) cph 3g04637 (color film copy neg.) cph 3j00045 digital file from intermediary roll film

CONTROL #: det1994000092/PP


Mulberry Street (Manhattan) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Manhattan, Mulberry Street is the street along which Manhattan's Little Italy is centered, and where it meets Chinatown. During the Feast of San Gennaro each September, the entire street is blocked off to vehicular traffic and pedestrians can roam free.

Heading south into Chinatown, the street is lined with Chinese green grocers, butcher stores, fish mongers. Further south past Bayard Street, on the west side of the street lies Columbus Park, the only park in New York's Chinatown. This was the center of the infamous Five Points section of NYC. On the east side of the street is lined with Chinatown's funeral homes.

Mulberry Street's most famous resident is perhaps Merle Allin, GG Allin's brother. It was also the subject of Billy Joel's song Big Man on Mulberry Street. The street is often identified as the setting of Dr. Seuss' story, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, but that distinction belongs to Springfield, Massachusetts, the birthplace of Theodor Geisel (a.k.a "Dr. Seuss").

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Mulberry Street (Manhattan)

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Wednesday, December 12, 2007

First Day of Winter

First Day of WinterPrivacy & Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service.

The Defense Visual Information Directorate. Information presented on DoD Imagery Server is considered public information. (High Resolution Image).
except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

About Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Winter From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. Almost all English-language calendars, going by astronomy, state that winter begins on the winter solstice, and ends on the spring equinox. Calculated more by the weather, it begins and ends earlier and is the season with the shortest days and the lowest temperatures. Either way, it generally has cold weather and, especially in the higher latitudes, snow and ice.

Depending on place and culture, start and end of winter can be defined as above or in other ways. Contemporary meteorology takes winter to be the months of June, July, and August in the Southern Hemisphere, and December, January, and February in the Northern Hemisphere.

Passing seasons change the habits and moods of people. During the winter months in the northern hemisphere, a gloominess nicknamed "winter blues", "February blahs", "Holiday depression", or doldrums, is informally noted amongst people. The severest cases of this type of depression is diagnosed as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Symptoms include sleeping more, tiredness, depression, and physical aches. Although causes include genetic disposition and stress, the prevailing environmental influence is decreased exposure to light due to the angle of the sun and the increased amount of clothing that must be worn to keep warm.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Winter

Pearl Harbor Remembered and and Festival of lights Hanukkah Menorah and Carbon nanotubes to be replaced by MoSIx nanowires in high-tech devices says new study

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Kwanzaa Child

Kwanzaa ChildPrivacy & Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service.

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except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

About Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Pearl Harbor Remembered and Festival of lights Hanukkah Menorah and Carbon nanotubes to be replaced by MoSIx nanowires in high-tech devices says new study

Monday, December 10, 2007

Festival of lights Hanukkah Menorah

Rabbi Abraham Morhaim lights the Hanscom menorah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Mark Wyatt)Festival of lights. HANSCOM AFB, Mass. -- Members of the Hanscom Jewish community gather together to celebrate the beginning of Hanukkah Dec. 5. Rabbi Abraham Morhaim lights the Hanscom menorah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Mark Wyatt). High Resolution Image
This image or file is a work of a U.S. Air Force Airman or employee, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

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Freedom Calendar 12/08/07 - 12/15/07 and Kwanzaa Candle Lighting and Thermoelectric materials are 1 key to energy savings