Thursday, July 31, 2008

the Russian Wolfhound or Borzoi

Russian Wolfhound or BorzoiThose who proclaim the Russian wolfhound, or borzoi, the most wonderful dog in the world have strong grounds for their opinion.
Of great size, a marvelous silky coat not long enough to hide his graceful lines, speed almost equal to a greyhound's, strength almost equal to that of an Irish wolf dog, and with long, muscular jaws, like a grizzly-bear trap, it is no wonder that he is such a favorite, and that beautiful women are so proud of his company.

But the gods always withhold something even from those whom they favor most, and
the borzois we have seen appeared to lack both the keen intelligence and the frank expression characteristic of their British cousins.

We know that the champions of the breed will differ from us in this, but the fact remains that the form of the Russian dog's head leaves little room for brains.

In Russia these hounds are used in wolf-hunting. The wolves are first driven out of
the woods by smaller dogs or by beaters, and when a wolf comes into the open two or three borzois, well matched as to speed and courage, are unleashed and sent after him. They are trained to seize the wolf, one on each side, just behind the ears, and they should do this both at the same moment, so that their antagonist cannot use his formidable teeth on either of them.

They hold their quarry until the huntsman arrives, leaps from his horse, and either dispatches the wolf with a knife or muzzles him and carries him off to be used in training young dogs in a large, railed inclosure made on purpose.

This handsome animal should be of extreme slenderness of head, leg, and waist; narrow
through the shoulders, but very deep in the chest. Pasterns and hocks well let down, and, like the greyhound and whippet, the borzoi should have the back strongly arched or reached to give play to the enormous unbending spring.

The legs are straighter than in the greyhound, especially at the stifle. Color is not a cardinal feature, as in Russia at least the borzoi is really used for wolf-
hunting and the color is unimportant. Here and in England, however, where they are kept solely for their graceful beauty, those in which white predominates, with head and flank markings of lemon, bay, brown, or black, are favorites.

The head should be extremely slender and narrow, the coat deep, silky, and nearly straight, the eyes full and round. Indeed, the eyes of the best dogs look rather flat and scared to one who sees them for the first time. In spite of his slender, rather obsequious, appearance, the borzoi is a serious opponent when in trouble. Woolly hair, bent pasterns, straight back, "cow hocks,'' and a gaily carried tail are all defects to be avoided.

The legs should be strong and straight, of good bone, for speed and endurance. . The feet should not be large, but compact, and with toes well arched and pads deep and elastic. The coach dog should be from 19 to 23 inches high and weigh from 35 to 50 pounds.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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Wednesday, July 30, 2008

The Dalmatian

The DalmatianThe Dalmatian - The Dalmatian was originally a "pointer" and in his native country was used for sporting purposes. But in England he was found to be very inferior to the native pointer,
and, as he showed a marked fondness for horses and stables, he was specially trained as a "coach" or "carriage" dog.

For more than a hundred years before the day of the automobile, it was a common thing
on English roads to see one of these muscular, deep-lunged, spotted dogs trotting easily between the hind wheels of a fashionable "turnout"' — so close, in fact, that it had the appearance of "weaving" in and out as the horses' heels flew back.

The automobile has virtually done away with it as a vehicle guardian and companion ; still its unusual appearance has been sufficient to maintain it among the fancy and a goodly number find their way to the big shows.

The coach dog strongly resembles a small, straight-legged pointer in general conformation, and differs chiefly in the shorter ear, straight front, and less arched stifle.

In color it must be white, evenly spangled all over with round, clearly defined spots of black or dark brown. Black is preferable and more usual. These spots must be sharp, and the more even and uniformly distributed the better. They may be confluent on the ears — it is a virtue to have dark ears — but elsewhere on the body it is a fault. In size they should be from half an inch to an inch in diameter, roughly.

The legs should be strong and straight, of good bone, for speed and endurance. . The feet should not be large, but compact, and with toes well arched and pads deep and elastic. The coach dog should be from 19 to 23 inches high and weigh from 35 to 50 pounds.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Helium Balloon Ride Central Park New York City

Helium Balloon Ride Central Park New York City

Helium Balloon Ride Central Park New York City

Helium Balloon Ride Central Park New York City

Helium Balloon Ride Central Park New York City
New York City Balloon Ride in Central Park. the balloons are tethered to the ground just west of Bethesda Fountain,next to the 72d street park traverse and are raised and lowered by an electrical winch.

The helium balloon ride carries the operator and four passengers in the wicker basket 300 feet up. The 10-minute ride commerates the 150th anniversary of the park's original design.

AeroBalloon, the company offering the rides, says that the 45 foot-wide balloons are filled with 47,500 cubic feet of helium.

The $25.00 ride is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Aug. 22, children 12 and under ride for $17.50. The company accepts reservations for rides between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.

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Monday, July 28, 2008

The Pointer

The PointerSo far we have spoken of dogs which when used for hunting purposes are usually supposed to catch and kill the game which they follow.
We now come to a class of hunting dogs which are not expected to kill the game, but to help their masters to kill it, or to retrieve it after it has been killed.

In the very front ranks stand the pointer and the setters — English, Irish, and Gordon — and which is the best is largely a matter of individual taste. The chief duty of each is to scent out the game (usually such birds as partridge, grouse, and quail), and, when near enough, point out to the gunner the spot where it lies concealed. As the hunter approaches, the birds rise and are shot on the wing.

Very often the dogs are trained to pick up and bring in the game after it is shot. The pointer, as the illustration shows, is smooth coated, and his name suggests his business. This most popular of upland hunting-dogs has undergone many changes in standard as to size, conformation, and color. But certainly no "strain" has been more successful, nor stamped its virtues more generally upon following generations of pointers, than the famous "graphic" pointers of 20 years ago, and it is one of the best of these 'that was used as a model.

The working pointer should be a lean, hard limbed, and well-muscled dog of about 60 pounds weight, though 10 pounds either way would meet the preferences of different fanciers. He must be keen of eye and nose, obedient, teachable, and staunch. Many otherwise fine pointers lack the courage of their convictions, and it is easy to spoil a good dog either by too gentle or too rough handling with liver, lemon, or black distributed in almost any fashion, Colors are legion ; white should predominate.

No finer upland bird-dog exists, and his endurance 'and energy are things to marvel at. As in all working dogs, the "tools of his trade" must be right. Soft, spready feet, weak legs or back, small or "snipy" nose are all vital defects.

The head is shaped very like that of a setter, but should be wider across the ears. A good, square profile is essential, with a well-defined stop. The tail, strong and full at the base, should taper rapidly and be as straight as possible. The breed is so popular and so widely used that there is little difficulty in getting well balanced pointers.

The continental "pointing griffon" is a type of growing popularity, with little to commend it above the better-known field-dogs except its novelty. It may be described as a wire-haired pointer, whose coat is rough and quite long, particularly over the eyes and on the muzzle.

It has a terrier-like expression that is rather prejudicial to the impression it makes upon one familiar with the frank, loyal look of a setter or pointer.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Sunday, July 27, 2008

Scottish Deerhound

Scottish DeerhoundThere is something about the shaggy hunting dogs of Britain that makes a particular appeal to those who are attracted to dogs. It may be the touching contrast of their harsh coat and rugged body with the soft, affectionate look in the almost hidden eye.
It may be the knowledge of the indomitable courage and immunity from fear that is latent in the friendly creature that noses our palm and meets our advances with such amiable readiness.

Whatever its causes, these brave and friendly dogs, such favorites with Landseer and Burns, have surely maintained their enviable position in our regard. In the United States they are seldom seen, as only a few have been introduced and little done to establish the breed here. This is unfortunate, though easy to understand, as our
laws do not permit the hunting of antlered game with dogs, and our carnivorous big game demands dogs of a heavier and more aggressive nature than these fleet chasers of the Highland stag.

In appearance the deerhound is much like a harsh-coated, grizzled greyhound, and is an undersized counterpart of the great Irish wolfhound, standing from 26 to 29 or 30 inches. They are self-colored, the dark blue grays being perhaps the favorites. Cream, fawn, sandy brown, and both light and dark brindlcs are perhaps more frequently seen. Any large amount of white is a fault, as it indicates a foreign strain, even though the dog be fine in other respects.

The Scottish deerhound might well be described as a powerfully built, rough-coated
greyhound. While not as swift as his English cousin, he has speed enough for most purposes and strength and stamina, which made him a valued partner in the chase before the days of the modern rifle.

In olden times the possession of a fine deerhound was a matter of sufficient consequence for tribes to go to war about. In a battle between the Picts and Scots over one of these dogs more than 160 men were killed.

The deerhound makes a wonderful companion. His honest, dark hazel eyes, looking straight out from under their shaggy brows, quiet but fearless, bespeak the rugged beauty of his soul and gain at once our admiration and our confidence.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Saturday, July 26, 2008

The Otterhound

The OtterhoundIt is said that every sizable stream in Great Britain has its otter. To hunt this elusive and wily animal, a very distinct type of dog has been evolved.
The requirements of the hunt demand the keenest of noses, the staunchest of "wills to hunt," the utmost courage, and the ability to stand the roughest of wet and dry coursing. These qualities have been assembled in the otterhound, which may be described as a bloodhound clad in the roughest of deerhound coats.

In general he is all hound, with long, sweeping ears, deep jaw, and deep-set eye snowing the haw. He is broader in the brow than the bloodhound and not quite so large, but he has the same fine carriage, on straight, strong, and heavily boned legs; large, sound, and partly webbed feet.

The hair over the eyes is long and ragged, and there is a strong tendency toward beard and moustache. He is a great favorite in Great Britain, but is rarely seen in America. In color he may be "hound colors," or "self-colored," fawn, brown, tawny, or black. The working dogs are so hardened by rough work that they are not particularly suitable as house dogs ; when reared to it, however, their fine qualities render them exceptional companions even for children.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Friday, July 25, 2008

Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian ElkhoundThe Norwegian elkhound is one of the wolfy looking dogs from which the shepherd dogs of middle Europe have been evolved, and is probably a more dependable dog than any of them, having been bred for the specific uses of hunting big game,
and left free of the refinements and stultifications demanded by the more effete market, which is largely dependent on the whims of wealth and caprice.

The elkhound, in short, looks like a small, stocky, wide-faced German shepherd dog,
standing about 22 inches instead of 26 or 27, but wearing the same strong, rough working coat of grizzled buff and brown, or wolf colors.

He is a rare dog in the United States, but in northern Europe plays an important part in the life of the people of the mountainous and wooded country. He is used to some extent as a carrying and draft animal, but is unsurpassed in the rough and tumble of the hunt for such big game as bear, wolves, and elk (the "moose" of northern Europe), and is so keen of nose and so tractable that he can easily be trained to the more subtle arts of hunting the capercailzie and black grouse.

The only one the artist ever saw was the single specimen shown in the Westminster
show of 1918, and no dog in the whole show made him more envious of his owner. For
what Mark Twain characterized as "the purposes of a dog" this strong, friendly, and primitive looking animal seemed a most perfect creature. He was alert, bright, and self-reliant, but willing to extend a reserved welcome to a new acquaintance.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Thursday, July 24, 2008

The Dingo

Several fine dingos have been kept in various zoological gardens in this country, those in Washington being especially typical and well conditioned.
The dingo is the most doglike of any of the wild members of the canine group, and the fact that they interbreed freely and produce regularly fertile progeny is further evidence of its proximity to the dogs of mankind.

He is a medium-sized animal, weighing 60 to 80 pounds, possessing all the dog's traits of character and of physique. He has a broad head, moderate-pointed ears, strong, well- boned legs, and a deep chest, which fit him for the long chase. His one wolfy characteristic is the quite bushy tail, which is about half-way between what a dog of similar coat would carry and the brush of a wolf.

Dingos untinctured by dog blood are self- colored red or tawny and are very fine-looking animals. They are said to be readily tamable, and those the artist has known were as tame and companionable as any dog. They would come to the bars of their inclosure, ears back and tails wagging, and lick the hand of their keeper, and did the same for the artist if the keeper was present. Never having tried to force friendship nor made advances when alone, it is impossible for the writer to say how catholic their tolerance was.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Wednesday, July 23, 2008

The Timber Wolf and Coyote

The timber, or gray, wolf, which undoubtedly has an influence in the formation of the native Indian and Eskimo dogs of this country, formerly occupied practically all of the northern continent of America.
He is a large, strong animal, attaining a weight of probably well over 100 pounds.

His main points of difference from "true" dogs are the woolly brush and the small, obliquely set eyes. In form he is close counterpart of such dogs as the German shepherd (see page 48). His coat is harsh and quite long, especially on the neck, throat, shoulders, and hind quarters.

In color he ranges from nearly pure white in the Arctic to black in Florida and the more humid regions. The average color1 is grizzled gray and buff. The coyote is extremely similar in color, following the changes, geographically, which characterize his big and burly cousin.

In weight the coyote seldom goes over 60 pounds, and an average would probably be under 40. He is much more fox-like in general appearance, having relatively as well as actually a more slender muzzle and even bushier tail. His gait is an easy, shadow-like trot until scared or in hot pursuit, when he flattens out and simply flies over the ground.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Scottish, West Highland and Skye Terriers

Scottish, West Highland and Skye Terriersthe Scottish terrier, or "Scottie," as he is familiarly called — a short- legged, stocky-bodied, wire-coated "tyke," who looks like nothing else in the world. Of course, he hails from the Highlands of Scotland, where he is used to unearth foxes and other "varmints." His pluck has earned for him the soubriquet "die-hard," and usually he "lives" right up to it.
The "Scotty" is a "one-man dog." There is probably no dog more indifferent to the advances of any one but his own master or mistress. Mrs. Baynes has a Scottish terrier named Heatherbloom. The little tyke cares nothing for the other side of the Baynes household, and only in the absence of her mistress will she condescend to follow him. For her, other people do not exist, except as things to bark at sometimes. But to the one and only mistress she is loyalty itself. bloom will lie on the bed hour after hour, her head between her paws, and her bright eyes, half screened by her long lashes, steadily shining on the face she loves.

His trustful eye. homely comeliness, and whimsical playfulness combine to endear the Scottish terrier strongly, and no dog is more companionable or unobtrusively affectionate. In these traits he is much like his rough little cousin, the West Highland white, from which, in fact, he differs in nothing so much as in the color of his coat.

The Scotty is usually black or very dark grizzled with yellowish tips, although steel or iron gray, brindle, sandy and wheaten specimens are occasionally seen. The dark dogs are much more popular here, however. A good dog should stand 10 to 12 inches and weigh 16 to 20 pounds. The long-whiskered face; low, strong body; short, heavy legs, and rather heavy though gaily carried tail are all "earmarks" of the well-bred Scotty. He is all terrier, and with all his busy, active ways he combines a dignity and solemnity of manner that is very amusing.

THE WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER The West Highland white is almost the counterpart of the Scottish terrier except in color, which must be pure white, with black- nose. The forehead is higher, and a distinct stop is evident in the profile. The coat is double, the long outer hair being very harsh and wiry, the under coat much shorter and softer. The Cairn and Sealyham terriers are rapidly coming into popularity, and belong in this group.

The Cairn terrier has less pronounced whiskers than the Scotty, and his coat is somewhat shorter and reveals his form rather more, while the Sealyham is quite different in that the ears, instead of being short and pointed, are quite long and lop forward like an Airedale's.

In color they are like the wire-haired fox terrier — white, with or without patches of black for sandy red) on the face. The Sealyham is supposed to have Dandie Dinmont in his make-up, which gives him substance and rather a more bandy-legged appearance than Scotty or his white cousin should have. The head, with its lopping ears and more pronounced stop, has a less piquant expression. The tail is docked and carried high.

THE SKYE TERRIER No doubt in his earlier days the Skye terrier was a good sport, but of late years he has given so much consideration to "dress" that he has degenerated into a lap-dog. His coat, which is his chief title to distinction, is so long that it is not easy to see whether he is going or coming. And he can't tell you; for there is so much hair over his eyes that he can't see for himself.

The long hair covers this dog so completely as totally to conceal the physical characteristics it is supposed to possess. There are two types : those with pendent ears and those with upright "pricked" ears. The dog himself is long and low, like the other Scotch terriers, and the hair, which parts from his nose to his tail, comes nearly or quite to the ground. This outer coat is quite hard and nearly straight, curls being a grave fault, though a moderate wave is generally present ; it should be at least 5 1/2 inches long on the body, thougli shorter on the head. It falls forward and nearly conceals the eyes.

The only visible feature of a good Skye is his black hutton of a nose. The undercoat is much softer and more sympathetic to the touch. In color the Skye may be dark or light " blue" or gray, or fawn with black points. The height is about 9 inches and the weight 16 to 20 pounds.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Monday, July 21, 2008

English, Irish and Gordon Setters

English, Irish and Gordon SettersSetters have long but "flat" silky coats and plumed tails, and as a rule very gentle faces, full of expression. In olden times, when it was customary to "net" game, these dogs were taught to point the birds and then to crouch or "set,"
that the net might be thrown over and beyond them ; hence the name.

The English, Irish, and Gordon setters are almost too well known to need any physical description. Fashions have changed somewhat, and will probably continue to do so, in these as in other popular breeds. Still, the needs are so definite, and performance is such a necessary foundation for appearance, that the setters will probably never deviate very widely from the present standard, except in minor points attained by crossing the known types.

It is doubtful if any serious breeder would trust other than setter blood in these already very beautiful and useful dogs. In this country no dog is so well fitted for hunting grouse, pheasants, quail, and feathered upland and woodland game in general. In comparing the three principal types, the English is the largest and strongest, and is largely white, with liver, tan, orange, or black blotches and "ticking." The Irish is the lightest and most finely drawn, and is all rich mahogany tan ; he has a more high-strung disposition than either of the others, and is rather more nervous and subject to temperamental weaknesses, though when well trained and intelligently handled is unsurpassed as a field and hunting dog.

The Gordon is a north British development, to be used chiefly on the red grouse of the heathery uplands, and is black, with deep tan chops, ear-linings, chest, belly, feet, and feather, and the characteristic tan spots over the eyes and on the cheeks. For several years he was bred to a very delicate, slender-headed type : he was then a very affectionate and beautiful creature, but lacked the staunchness such a hunting dog must have.

The present standard dictates a dog of almost exactly the conformation of the English setter : wide across the forehead, strong, fairly broad, and very deep in the chest, with plentiful bone in legs and good, hard, compact feet. In this country, where the autumn woods abound in russet browns and deep shadows, the solid red and the black and tan dogs arc harder to follow with the eye than those with a fair amount of white ; hence the English setter and the mainly white pointer are favorites among the hunters, though the Irish has many adherents among those desiring a beautiful and companionable dog. The Gordon is nearly obsolete in this country.

known by the kennel names of their breeders, such as Belton and Llewellyn setters. These are excellent quality dogs, being somewhat more of the build of the Irish setter and considerably lighter and more delicately put together than the staunch old English setter. Both are white, with much tine ticking of black which in the long white coat has a bluish appearance.

All setters should show quite a marked stop, have full, sympathetic, and intelligent eyes, soft, fine, nearly straight hair, a full feather along the back of all four legs, as well as from the lower side of the tail. They should be built much like a pointer, except that they lack the springy arched quality of legs and back, being rather more careful, but much less rapid, workers than these rangers of the open fields.

The stifle should be straight from front or back instead of free and outturned.
Under his soft and rather silky coat, the setter should be hard, finely muscled, and compact, and none of these dogs should be allowed to get fat and lazy, as they so often become in the hands of affectionate owners. No dog has a more wheedling way with him, and it takes a rather firm nature to withstand his wiles. '

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Sunday, July 20, 2008

The Greyhound

The GreyhoundDeveloped originally for great speed in the pursuit of antelope, gazelles, and desert hares, the greyhound, though one of the most ancient, is also one of the most extreme types of dog known to man.
Very slender and fine of line, he still maintains great strength, and his lovely "compensating" curves and streamlines of form present a wonderful example of the beauty that inevitably accompanies a perfectly adapted mechanism

His motion is supremely graceful and easy, and in repose his elegance does not diminish. This is a tall dog, measuring from 28 to 31 inches at shoulder and weighing from 60 to 70 pounds. The hair is short and close, revealing intimately the wonderful surface muscles. The slender legs have sufficient bone for strength, and the arched back is well muscled, though slender.

The sloping shoulders allow for a long forward reach in the spring, and the chest,
while rather narrow, is immensely deep, with ribs fairly sprung, giving sufficient capacity. The head, while slender, has considerable strength of jaw, and the eye is bright and responsive.

While not as intelligent as some dogs, the greyhound is by no means stupid. His finely chiseled head, delicate ears, and arched neck give him a distinctive and wellborn appearance equaled by few dogs.

The Italian greyhound is simply a diminutive greyhound. In both any color is permissible. As we look to the ancient Greeks for the highest development of the human body, so we look to the great hunting dogs of ancient lineage for the highest development of canine grace.

These tall, powerful hounds, trained for ages to match their speed and strength
against fleet and often savage wild creatures, have attained that beauty found only in those things which are perfectly adapted to the purposes for which they are used.
Swiftest and most graceful of all, perhaps, is the English greyhound. Built, it would seem, of spring steel and whipcord, and with a short satin coat which offers no resistance to the wind, this swallow among dogs cleaves the air and barely touches the ground he flies over.

Even the fleet English hare is no match for him in speed, and were it not that the hare has a clever knack of dodging at the moment the dog is about to overtake her, she would be quickly caught.

General Roger D. Williams, of Lexington, Kentucky, who has done a great deal of wolf-
hunting in the West, states that greyhounds can not only overtake a timber wolf, but will close with him instantly, regardless of consequences, which is more than some wolfhounds will do.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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Saturday, July 19, 2008

The Dachshund, or badger dog

The Dachshund, or badger dogThe dachshund, or badger dog, combines to a high degree the qualities of the hound and the terrier, and probably both of these were used in his development, but where he got his crumpled legs is less apparent.


He is the favorite dog of Germany, where his special work is to enter a badger hole and hold the attention of the animal until it can be dug out. Badgers often work serious havoc in the cultivated fields, and they can dig their way through the ground so rapidly that it is very difficult for diggers to overtake one without the
use of a dog.

To follow this tierce, belligerent, and really dangerous animal into his burrow and drag him out requires a dog of great courage and tenacity, not to mention peculiar design. His long body, short legs, and large, out turned fore feet subject him to much ridicule, and it is often said that in Germany be is sold by the yard.

The dachshund usually seen in this country has a short and very silky coat, but there are also a long-haired and a rough-coated variety. The well-formed dachshund should be three times as long, from nose to base of tail, as he is high at the shoulder. The head should be long and slender, but far from snipy, the nose running smoothly into the line of the forehead, with little depression at the top, and the occiput should be evident.

The hound-like ears, combined with this mart; terrier-like head, give him an expression all his own. The body and neck are Iong, but muscular and compact, entirely free from sagginess or weakness, and the tail is the true, tapering, terrier
style, as nearly straight as may be. The legs and feet are very important. While
extremely short, they must be very strong and well boned. The fore legs, while bowed and twisted somewhat, must be strong, elbows out, wrists in, and feet turned out.

The hind legs are to be strong and capable, and viewed from behind must go down straight and by no means show the turning in at the heel, known as cow hocks. This is very common and very bad. The thigh, when standing, goes down nearly straight : the shank (between stifle and hock) goes straight back horizontally, and the last joint, or rear pastern, is about vertical, parallel to the (high.

The feet are large, deep, and well padded. They are generally black and tan, revealing the terrier strain here in the persistency of this dominant color-pattern. There are strains, however, of a whole-colored dark red tan, or "cherry," or even solid brown. .The last named are not considered as good, and must be excellent in other respects to be given a favorable rating with the better-known colors.

In disposition they combine to an unusual degree the virtues of their respective ancestors, having the affectionate, companionable qualities of the hound and the tenacity, courage, and self-reliance of the terrier.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

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Friday, July 18, 2008

Boston terrier and French Bulldog

Boston terrier and French BulldogThe Boston terrier, is an American made animal, whose bull and terrier ancestors came from England between 40 and 50 years ago. Many of them settled in Boston,
where they became so refined that in a few generations much of the bulldog was bred out of them.

When, about 1801, their owners formed the American Bull Terrier Club of Boston and applied to the American Kennel Club for the registration of the breed, the application was refused on the ground that the dogs were no longer "bull" terriers.
It was suggested that the breed be named simply "Boston terrier." This suggestion was
accepted, the club changed its name to the Boston Terrier Club, and the breed received full recognition in 1893.

It is said to be the most scrupulously courteous dog having any bulldog blood in his veins, and is generally recognized as the most conservative terrier in the world. The Boston terrier is not as large as the bull terrier, weighing from 15 to 27 pounds, and being judged in three classes, according to weight. The most popular "middleweight" class is from 17 to 22 pounds.

The ideal markings are brindle (dark preferred, some are almost black), with white muzzle, blaze, neck all round, chest and all or part of fore legs and hind legs below hocks. The coat is short, smooth, and bright. The ears are commonly trimmed. The deformities of the bulldog are here happily lacking, and we have a bright, playful, courageous little dog that stands well over (not hangs between) his legs, which, while well apart, are not bowed nor bandied, but strong, fairly heavy in bone, and straight. The stifle, however, is well bent.

He is all in all a very compact little dog. The tail, "screw" or straight, must be carried low. The face is intelligent, rather square, the nose, while short, is not pushed in, and the jaws are even, broad, and fairly deep. He is in every sense a good practical dog.

THE FRENCH BULLDOG - formerly used in Spain for baiting bulls. But dogs of the original type found their way to France, where they were eventually reduced in size and "beautified," until today a normal specimen of this breed is not unlike a miniature bulldog, except that his teeth do not show when his mouth is closed, and that he has well rounded "bat" ears, which form perhaps his most noticeable characteristic.

This bat-eared, flat-faced little gnome among dogs has a wide and enthusiastic following. The reason for this is doubtless that he is such a nice little dog in spite of all man can do to make him unfit for life, by condensing the nasal region and developing an oversize jaw. The bulldog tendencies arc exaggerated. The head is similar, but the face is flatter and more vertical in profile, with the jaw somewhat less turned up.

They are perky, inquisitive little things, but much given to asthma and the sniffles, which is not their fault but ours. The proper color is dark brindle, though light brindle is not frowned upon. More than a trace of white on toes and chest is discountenanced. The tail, carried low, should be either screwed or straight. In form he is all bulldog, the only radical differences being the flat face and the large upstanding ears, graphically called "bat-ears" by the fancy.

These are important, and should be wide at the base, tapering up to a rounded point, carried high but not too close together, and with the orifice directed forward. The light weight should weigh under 22 pounds, the heavy weights from 22 to 28 pounds. Next to toy dogs, the French bulldog and the "miniature" bulldog are among those best suited to city life. Neither of them requires a great deal of exercise, and with intelligent, thoughtful owners may be kept successfully, even in a flat. Rut life in a flat, even for dogs of this kind, is a hard one unless they are in the care of some conscientious person who will give them daily exercise.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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Thursday, July 17, 2008

German shepherd dog and Belgian shepherd dog

German shepherd dog and Belgian shepherd dog - On the continent of Europe there are many kinds of dogs used for guarding sheep, but those best known in this country are the German and Belgian sheep-dogs.

They have come into unusual prominence within the last five years because of the notable part they have played with the Red Cross units and in other activities on the battlefields of France and Belgium.

This is one of the handsomest and most attractive of dogs, and approximates more closely than any other the really wolf type. Strong and clean of limb, bright of eye, and alert in every sense, gifted with a very high intelligence and a wonderful memory for what he has been taught, he is a most excellent and useful working dog. The German shepherd dog should stand 22 to 26 inches at the shoulder and show in every line the qualities which he is supposed to possess : "intelligence, alertness, loyalty, gentleness, courage, obedience, willingness, and devotion." He is a graceful, powerful dog, with beautiful lines and curves denoting both strength and speed.

German shepherd dog and Belgian shepherd dog

It is not necessary to mention the many uses he has been put to in the present war, as Red Cross, No Man's Land patrol, messenger, and ration-carrier. It is perhaps as well to say here that any such active, restless, vigorous, and intelligent animal as this becomes a grave responsibility to its owner and should be sedulously cared for and kept in control every minute.

They become very dangerous when neglected or turned adrift or thrown on their own resources by being lost, and once they form a habit of chicken or sheep killing they become inveterate and persistent in their maraudings and ordinarily must be shot.

One very beautiful dog of this kind was recently shot in the Catskills after repeated ravages which started a rumor of wolves in the region. This impression was very natural, and when the photographs sent to the Conservation Commission were identified as a dog the rustic sufferers were still only partly convinced. Dog it was, however, and apparently a very fine example of this new and interesting type.

While the standard allows great range of color, those most often seen in this country are of the so-called "wolf" colors — dark tipping of hair over a tawny or buff ground.

The muzzle (unlike that of a wolf) is usually blackish. Both the German and the Belgian dogs may be divided into three general types, namely, rough-haired, wire-haired, and smooth-haired. By their erect ears and general expression they betray their near relationship to the wolf.

Some of the varieties are becoming popular in this country as companions, and while they do not seem demonstratively affectionate they are staunch and loyal and conduct themselves with quiet dignity which is equaled by few other breeds.

THE BELGIAN SHEPHERD DOG: Many types of shepherd dogs have been developed in Europe, and doubtless a good many have just "growed," like Topsy. But it is not likely that the Belgian dog is of the latter class, for in common with several other Belgian varieties he has arrived at a very concise standard, and has proved in the present war one of the most dependable and valuable of dogs for the purposes of finding and bringing aid to the wounded in No Man's Land, as well as carrying messages where a man could not go and live.

He is a trifle smaller than the better known and more extensively advertised German shepherd, or "police," dog, and is usually solid black in color. He is also a bit stockier and less rangy in build and has a little more width of brow. While not so strong as his big, light- colored German congener, nor so formidable as an antagonist, he is equally intelligent and capable, equally keen of scent and sight, and probably less of a responsibility for his owner.

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Wednesday, July 16, 2008

The Bloodhound



The bloodhound is a dog of only medium size and, in spite of his name and reputation, is gentle and affectionate. According to some authorities, these dogs were brought to England by William the Conqueror; according to others, they were brought by pilgrims from the Holy Land.

They are often spoken of as "black St. Huberts," but there were white ones and red ones also, and it is quite possible that our modern bloodhounds are a blend of the three. They probably derive their name from the fact that originally they were used to track animals which were wounded and bleeding, though they have long been associated chiefly with the tracking of men, and for the last hundred years or more, particularly with the trailing of criminals.

The English bloodhound is simply the extreme development of those characteristics which typify the hound : long, low-hung ears, loose skin, long muzzle, and somber expression find in him their greatest degree of perfection. In fact, the skin of the head and face is so loose and ample that it falls into deep folds and wrinkles; the weight of the ears pulls it into furrows, and the lower eyelid falls away from the eye, disclosing a deep haw. The ears, of thin, fine leather, are so long as to trail when the nose is down.

The Bloodhound

The head is well domed, the occipital point is very prominent, the flews and dewlap reach excessive development, only equaled in the St. Bernard.

The bloodhound should stand 23 to 27 inches and weigh from 80 to 95 or 100 pounds. He should be black and tan, in strict conformity with the standard as shown in the picture, or all deep tan. The more primitive coloring, the black and tan, is generally preferred. The tail is not carried quite so gaily as in the case of foxhounds and beagles. Any appreciable amount of white betrays impurity of strain. In disposition he is the gentlest of gentle hounds, though his rather fearsome name has earned him an unjust notoriety with those who do not know much about dogs.

Only a few kennels breed bloodhounds now. They are used by police departments, both in this country and in Europe, and if brought to the scene of a crime within a few hours after it has been committed, and if the criminal fled across ground not too much trampled over by other people, they can render valuable assistance by leading the police directly to the man they are seeking. There have been bloodhounds credited with following a trail thirty hours after it was made, but such performances must be made under ideal conditions and are very rare, to say the least.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This image is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

The Bloodhound

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1902, are now in the public domain In the United States,

Title: The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 64. Publisher: Century Company, 1902. Original from: Indiana University. Digitized: Jan 21, 2009

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Tuesday, July 15, 2008

The Beagle and Basset Hound

The Beagle and Basset HoundThe Beagle and Basset Hound - The beagle is not over 15 inches high. He must not be bandy-legged like the dachshund, nor long and low in the body, these qualities being reserved for the basset.
He should be an active, intelligent, well proportioned, and capable little dog, with plenty of tenacity of purpose, though great speed is not to be expected. The ears, while long, do not in any way equal those of the bloodhound or basset, reaching just to the tip of the nose.

He must have no terrier traits, either physical or temperamental, nor any throaty tendency. The expression is just like that of a very alert foxhound. The legs must be strong and straight and the hock fairly well bent, and the feet strong and close, with full, hard pads. Any hound colors are correct — that is, black saddle and neck, with tan legs, hips, shoulders, and head, interrupted anywhere by white.

They carry a gay stern, and are in every way very engaging, safe, companionable little dogs. Like all hounds, they make friends easily, and are therefore more easily led astray than some dogs, particularly when young. Harriers resemble foxhounds, but are somewhat smaller, and, as the name implies, are kept for bunting hares. They arc not used in this country, but in England they are hunted in packs as in fox-hunting, the hunters following on horseback. The beagle and basset are smaller hounds,
used chiefly for hunting hares and rabbits, and are usually followed on foot. There are smooth-coated and rough-coated varieties of both breeds.

The basset, which is little known in this country, was imported into England from
France between fifty and sixty years ago. It was a popular sporting dog in Germany and Russia also at that time. With its keen scent, extremely short legs, and very slow movements, it was well equipped for finding game in dense cover. The face of the rough basset is often very wistful; it is one of the most beautiful canine faces I know.

The basset is doubtless a compound of the old long-eared hound and the dachshund. Indeed, the type is exactly described if we picture a small bloodhound set on a dachshund's legs, and further words become unnecessary, except to say that the breed "comes" in two forms — smooth or hound-coated and rough or terrier- coated. The latter has never, I think, and the former but seldom, been introduced into this country, where the more active (though possibly more erratic) beagle has so firm a hold.

In Europe it is used as a rabbit dog, being low enough to enter the warren. Here, where the rabbits do not dig, but live on the surface, the lively beagle is more useful than his slow, sedate, and steady congener. Any "hound color" is correct.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Monday, July 14, 2008

Belgian Schipperke

Belgian SchipperkeTHE SCHIPPERKE The schipperke got his name from being so frequently seen on the canal barges of Belgium, where he makes a good "watch" and keeps down the rats. The word is pronounced "skip-perkee" and is the Flemish for "little skipper."
Doubtless an offshoot of the "wolfspitz," of Central Europe, this Belgian pet dog has attained a marked individuality, and really resembles no other dog at all closely.

He is a glossy, shining black all over, has a fox-like head, with rather small but very bright and, intelligent eyes, a small, sharp nose, and prick ears. The whole neck and breast are covered with an erect frill of longer hair, as arc the back margins of the thighs. The shoulders and chest are deep nnd strong, and the well-tuckcd-up little body is firm and springy. The legs are light, but strong, and the feet small and dainty.

The tail is a mere stump, or button, more than an inch being a disqualification. They are said to be born tailless, and probably some are. But it is easy to meet this requirement, and. it is certain that not any grow up with a tail, however they started in.

The "little skipper" finds his congenial home on the canal-boats of Belgium and Holland, but has discovered a satisfactory substitute in the pampered homes of the rich in other countries. Like all spitz offshoots, he is bright, active, and affectionate, but just a little snobbish, and apt to be very: .jealous of any other pets in his household. He is a small dog, weighing about 12 pounds.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

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See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Sunday, July 13, 2008

Dogs Great Danes

Dogs Great DanesGreat Danes from The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University
This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

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Saturday, July 12, 2008

Solar Eclipse Corona

Solar Eclipse CoronaThe solar corona, which produces solar wind, is evident in this eclipse.

Like other stars its size, the Sun has an outer atmosphere that is slowly but steadily flowing off into space.
This material, consisting mostly of electrically charged atoms called ions, flows outward past the planets in a constant stream called the "solar wind." This wind is a snapshot of the materials in the surface layers of the Sun, which in turn reflects the makeup of the original solar nebula.

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To use a credit line in connection with images. Unless otherwise noted in the caption information for an image, the credit line should be "Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech." The endorsement of any product or service by Caltech, JPL or NASA must not be claimed or implied.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Friday, July 11, 2008

Nikola Tesla

The Inventions, Researches and Writings of Nikola Tesla. By Thomas Commerford Martin, Nikola Tesla. Published 1894 The Electrical Engineer Original from Harvard University. Press of Mcnroy & Emmet, 36 CortUndt St., N. Y
Includes three lectures by Tesla: I. Experiments with alternate currents of very high frequency, and their application to methods of artificial illumination, delivered before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers at Columbia College, N.Y., May 20, 1891.--II. Experiments with alternate currents of high potential and high frequency, delivered before the Institution of Electrical Engineers, London, Feb. 3, 1892.--III. On light and other high frequency phenomena, delivered before the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Feb., 1893, and before the National Electric Light Association, St. Louis, March, 1893.

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This inage however may not be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Wednesday, July 09, 2008

New York City Firetruck

New York City FiretruckNew York City Firetruck in Central Park at 72d street and 5th avenue.
Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Tuesday, July 08, 2008

Eastern Purple Coneflower or Purple Coneflower Echinacea purpurea

Eastern Purple Coneflower or Purple Coneflower Pink Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) at The Central Park Conservatory Garden. Located between 103d and 105th streets just west of 5th avenue.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Eastern Purple Coneflower or Purple Coneflower Echinacea purpurea

Eastern Purple Coneflower or Purple Coneflower Echinacea purpurea

Echinacea purpurea From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Recognizable by its purple cone-shaped flowers, it is native to eastern North America and present to some extent in the wild in much of the eastern, southeastern and midwest United States and often known as the purple coneflower.

Echinacea purpurea is also grown as an ornamental plant, and numerous cultivars have been developed for flower quality and plant form.

This perennial flowering plant is 1.2 m tall and 0.5 m wide at maturity. Depending on the climate, it begins to bloom in late May or early July, before losing its flowers in August.[citation needed] Its flowers are hermaphroditic, having both male and female organs on each flower. It is pollinated by butterflies. Its habitats include dry open woods, prairies and barrens, as well as cultivated beds. Although the plant prefers loamy or sandy, well-drained soils, it is little affected by the soil's ph. Unable to grow in the shade, Echinacea purpurea thrives in either dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought, once established.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Echinacea purpurea SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

Monday, July 07, 2008

Felix the Cat in Hollywood

Felix the Cat in Hollywood. Felix the Cat. A scene of Felix "laffing" from "Felix in Hollywood" (1923).

This work is in the public domain because it was published in the United States between 1923 and 1963 with a copyright notice, and its copyright was not renewed.

This image may however not be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term to US works, If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Image Text: is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, are now in the public domain. 

This image text is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year. +sookie tex

Felix the Cat in Hollywood

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Felix the Cat From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Felix the Cat is a cartoon character created in the silent-film era. His black body, white eyes, and giant grin, coupled with the surrealism of the situations in which his cartoons place him, combined to make Felix one of the most recognizable cartoon characters in the world. Felix was the first character from animation to attain a level of popularity sufficient to draw movie audiences based solely on his star power.

Felix's origins remain disputed. Australian cartoonist/film entrepreneur Pat Sullivan, owner of the Felix character, claimed during his lifetime to be its creator as well. American animator Otto Messmer, Sullivan's lead animator, has more commonly been assigned credit in recent decades. Some historians argue that Messmer ghosted for Sullivan. What is certain is that Felix emerged from Sullivan's studio, and cartoons featuring the character enjoyed unprecedented success and popularity in the 1920s.

From 1922, Felix enjoyed sudden, enormous popularity in international popular culture. He got his own comic strip (drawn by Messmer) and his image soon adorned all sorts of merchandise from ceramics to toys to postcards. There were several manufacturers who made stuffed Felix toys. Jazz bands such as Paul Whiteman's played songs about him. The most popular song of 1923 was "Felix Kept On Walking", and further songs followed.

Nevertheless, Felix's success was fading by the late 1920s with the arrival of sound cartoons. These new shorts, particularly those of Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse, had made the silent offerings of Sullivan and Messmer, who were then unwilling to move to sound production, seem outdated. In 1929, Sullivan decided to finally make the transition and began distributing Felix sound cartoons through Copley Pictures. The sound Felix shorts proved to be a failure and the operation ended in 1930 with Sullivan himself passing away in 1933. Felix saw a brief three cartoon resurrection in 1936 by the Van Beuren Studios, but the glory of the old days had disappeared during the cat's short-lived stint in color and sound.

Television would prove the cat's savior. Felix cartoons began airing on American TV in 1953. Meanwhile, Joe Oriolo, who was now directing the Felix comic strips, introduced a redesigned, "long-legged" Felix in a new animated series for TV. Oriolo also added new characters, and gave Felix a "Magic Bag of Tricks", which could assume an infinite variety of shapes at Felix's behest. The cat has since starred in other television programs and in a feature film. Felix is still featured on a wide variety of merchandise from clothing to toys. Oriolo's son, Don Oriolo, now controls creative work on Felix movies.

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