Showing posts with label Martin Luther King Jr.. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Martin Luther King Jr.. Show all posts

Monday, December 23, 2013

Dr. Martin Luther King and Edward B Footmon.Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.

Dr. Martin Luther King and Edward B Footmon Civil Rights March on Washington. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking, as Edward B Footmon looks on 08/28/1963.

National Archives Identifier: 542069 Local Identifier: 306-SSM-4D-107-16 Creator(s): U.S. Information Agency. Press and Publications Service. (ca. 1953 - ca. 1978) (Most Recent)

From: Series : Miscellaneous Subjects, Staff and Stringer Photographs, compiled 1961 - 1974. Record Group 306: Records of the U.S. Information Agency, 1900 - 2003.

Level of Description: Item. Type(s) of Archival Materials: Photographs and other Graphic Materials. This item was produced or created: 08/28/1963. The creator compiled or maintained the series between: 1961 - 1974,

Access Restriction(s): Unrestricted. Use Restriction(s): Unrestricted

Contributors to Authorship and/or Production of the Archival Material(s): Scherman, Rowland, Photographer

Variant Control Numbers ARC Identifier: 542069 NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-306-SSM-4D(107)16

Archived Copies Copy 1: Preservation Contact(s): National Archives at College Park - Still Pictures (RD-DC-S), National Archives at College Park. 8601 Adelphi Road. College Park, MD 20740-6001. Phone: 301-837-0561. Fax: 301-837-3621. Email: stillpix@nara.gov Copy 1 Media Information: Specific Media Type: Negative

Martin Luther King and Edward B Footmon.Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.

Edward B Footmon and Dr. Martin Luther King Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. National Archives Identifier: 542068. Local Identifier: 306-SSM-4D-107-8. ARC Identifier: 542068. NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-306-SSM-4D(107)8

Edward B Footmon and Dr. Martin Luther King Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Lorraine Motel, Memphis, Tennessee

Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King was assissinated during the Civil Rights Movement on April 4, 1968 Memphis, Tennessee

Title: Lorraine Motel, Memphis, Tennessee. Creator(s): Highsmith, Carol M., 1946-, photographer. Date Created / Published: 2006 April 17. Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-04695 (original digital file)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 04695 (ONLINE) [P and P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes: Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King was assissinated during the Civil Rights Movement on April 4, 1968. Title, date, and subjects provided by the photographer. Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith's America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Gift and purchase; Carol M. Highsmith; 2009; (DLC/PP-2010:031). Forms part of: Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.

Balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee


Lorraine Motel, Memphis, Tennessee

Subjects: United States--Tennessee--Memphis. Lorraine. Motels. Martin Luther King, Jr. Assassination. America.

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Riot damage in Washington D.C. following assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images.  Photograph shows the ruins of a store in Washington, D.C., that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Title: Riot damage in D.C. / [WKL]. Creator(s): Leffler, Warren K., photographer. Date Created / Published: 1968 Apr. 16. Medium: 1 negative : film.

Summary: Photograph shows the ruins of a store in Washington, D.C., that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ds-00840 (digital file from original) LC-DIG-ppmsca-03132 (digital file from original)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LC-U9- 18989-7A [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Notes: Title from contact sheet folder caption. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection. Contact sheet available for reference purposes: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 18989, frame 7A.

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Race riots--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Ruins--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Debris--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970.

Format: Film negatives--1960-1970. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.


Friday, January 13, 2012

'Don't work' sign promoting a holiday to honor the anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King

Title: ["Don't work" sign promoting a holiday to honor the anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.]

Creator(s): Trikosko, Marion S., photographer. Date Created / Published: 1969 Apr. 3. Medium: 1 negative : film. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-03197 (digital file from original)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LC-U9- 20851-6A c-P&P. Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Notes: Title devised by Library staff. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection. Contact sheet available for reference purposes: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 20851, frame 6A.

Subjects: King, Martin Luther,--Jr.,--1929-1968--Commemoration. African Americans--Civil rights--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Signs (Notices)--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Format: Film negatives--1960-1970.

Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, at the age of 39. On June 10, 1968, James Earl Ray, a fugitive from the Missouri State Penitentiary, was arrested in London at Heathrow Airport, extradited to the United States, and charged with the crime. On March 10, 1969, Ray entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to 99 years in the Tennessee state penitentiary. He died in prison on April 23, 1998, at the age of 70.

sign promoting a holiday to honor the anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Un-edited Image JPEG (50kb) || JPEG (132kb) || TIFF (13.0mb)

TEXT RESOURCE: Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. From Wikipedia,

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home

NORTH FRONT, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM THE NORTHEAST - Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home, 501 Auburn Avenue, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA. Title: NORTH FRONT, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM THE NORTHEAST - Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home, 501 Auburn Avenue, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA. Medium: 4 x 5 in. Reproduction Number: HABS GA,61-ATLA,48--12 (CT)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html)

This file is a work of a Department of the Interior employee, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Call Number: HABS GA,61-ATLA,48--12 (CT) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Collections: Historic American Buildings Survey / Historic American Engineering Record / Historic American Landscapes Survey.

Historic American Buildings Survey, National Park Service. Department of the Interior. Washington, D.C. 20240. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home

Un-edited Image JPEG (99kb) || JPEG (263kb) || TIFF (51.7mb)

STYLE (IF APPROPRIATE) Queen Anne, MATERIAL OF CONSTRUCTION (INCLUDESTRUCTURAL SYSTEMS) ijrame with clapboarding; shingles in gables

SHAPE AND DIMENSIONS OF STRUCTURE (SKETCHED FLOOR PLANS ON SEPARATE PAGES ARE ACCEPTABLE) Irregular shape, 4-bay front first story, 3-bay front second story; hipped roof with secon/dary gables; porch with shed roof on front and one side.

EXTERIOR FEATURES OF NOTE, Porch has turned posts and scroll-saw brackets. INTERIOR FEATURES OF NOTE (DESCRIBE FLOOR PLANS, IF NOT SKETCHED) Irregular plan. MAJOR ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS WITH DATES Restoration begun 1974. PRESENT CONDITION AND USE Condition in 1980 was good. Open to public as a historic house museum.

OTHER INFORMATION AS APPROPRIATE SOURCES OF INFORMATION (INCLUDING LISTING ON NATIONAL REGISTER, STATE REGISTERS, ETC.)
Linley, John. The Georgia Catalog, Historic American Buildings Survey. 1982. Listed on National Register of Historic Places. COMPILER, AFFILIATION Druscilla J. Null, HABS.

ADDENDUM TO HABS No. GA-1171 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BIRTH HOME Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site 501 Auburn Avenue 6n(Atlanta &l-ATI A Fulton County . ""^ Georgia.

This report in PDF FORMAT Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home

Monday, January 17, 2011

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking as Edward B. Footmon of the National Park Service looks on Civil Rights March on Washington

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking as Edward B. Footmon of the National Park Service looks on.], 08/28/1963 ARC Identifier 542068 / Local Identifier 306-SSM-4D(107)8 Item from Record Group 306: Records of the U.S. Information Agency, 1900 - 2003

Creator(s): U.S. Information Agency. Press and Publications Service. (ca. 1953 - ca. 1978). Type(s) of Archival Materials: Photographs and other Graphic Materials
Contact(s):

Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. PHONE: 301-837-0561; FAX: 301-837-3621; EMAIL: stillpixorder@nara.gov.

Production Date(s): 08/28/1963. Part Of: Series: Miscellaneous Subjects, Staff and Stringer Photographs, compiled 1961 - 1974.

Access Restriction(s): Unrestricted
Use Restriction(s): Unrestricted

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking as Edward B. Footmon of the National Park Service looks on Civil Rights March on WashingtonVariant Control Number(s): NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-306-SSM-4D(107)8

Copy Status: Preservation. Contact(s): Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. PHONE: 301-837-0561; FAX: 301-837-3621; EMAIL: stillpixorder@nara.gov.

Sunday, January 18, 2009

Dr. Martin Luther King jr.

Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. TITLE: [Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., half-length portrait, facing front] / World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico. CALL NUMBER: NYWTS - BIOG--King, Martin L.--Religion [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-126559 (b&w film copy neg.)

RIGHTS INFORMATION: No copyright restriction known. Staff photographer reproduction rights transferred to Library of Congress through Instrument of Gift.

MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1964. CREATOR: DeMarsico, Dick, photographer. NOTES: NYWT&S staff photograph. Forms part of: New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).

Dr. Martin Luther King jr.

SUBJECTS: King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968. FORMAT: Portrait photographs 1960-1970. Photographic prints 1960-1970. PART OF: New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c26559.hdl.loc.gov/cph.3c26559. CONTROL #: 00651714

Friday, April 04, 2008

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. This website and the information it contains are provided as a public service by the National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Department of the Interior.

Image Ownership - Information presented on this website, unless otherwise indicated , is considered in the public domain. It may may be distributed or copied as is permitted by the law.

This image or file is a work of a U.S. National Park Service employee, taken or made as part of that person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb

Martin Luther King Jr. TombDescription: Martin Luther King, Jr. & Coretta Scott King. Source: own-work (Simon J. Kurtz) Date: 08/11/2007. Author: Simon J. Kurtz. Permission: (Reusing this image) Granted to the public domain.

Licensing: I, the copyright holder (Simon J. Kurtz) of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I (Simon J. Kurtz) grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

In early 1968, King was devoting much of his time to recruiting for the Poor People's Campaign, when the Reverend James Lawson of Memphis, Tennessee, asked him to support a strike of black sanitation workers in that city. The sanitation workers had walked out in February 1968, because city officials refused to recognize their nearly all-black local of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The Community on the Move for Equality (COME) organization was formed to support the strikers. King was largely unaware of divisions within the Memphis black community between established clergy and NAACP officials and young Black Power adherents.

On March 18, King addressed a rally of fifteen thousand strikers and supporters in Memphis. Ten days later, King led a march that turned violent. A small minority of demonstrators began looting, and police attacked both looters and peaceful demonstrators. Deeply alarmed by the eruption of violence, King vowed to return to Memphis and conduct a wholly peaceful march to vindicate his nonviolent beliefs.

King arrived in Memphis on Wednesday, April 3, 1968, for talks with participants in a new march scheduled for Monday, April 8. Aides described King as depressed as a result of the violence that marked the previous march and the difficulties the SCLC was experiencing recruiting for the Poor People's Campaign. On Wednesday evening King addressed a small rally at the Memphis Mason Temple. The next evening, April 4, 1968, King was assassinated while standing on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Motel. Blacks and whites alike reacted with sorrow and anger to King's murder. Rioting in 110 American cities left thirty-nine dead in the days following King's death. Escaped convict James Earl Ray was tried and convicted of murdering King, although the question of whether Ray acted alone is still debated. The Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy succeeded King as president of the SCLC. Abernathy went ahead with the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, but failed to accomplish the campaign's goals.

King's body was flown to Atlanta, where it lay in state at Sisters Chapel of Spelman College. On April 9, 1968, Ralph Abernathy, who had been with King since the Montgomery bus boycott days, conducted his funeral service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Prominent civil rights leaders, black entertainers and professional athletes, and the four leading presidential contenders—Senator Eugene McCarthy, Senator Robert Kennedy, Vice President Hubert Humphrey, and Richard Nixon—attended the service. A crowd exceeding sixty thousand listened to the service over loudspeakers outside, and as many as fifty thousand joined in the funeral cortege from Ebenezer to the campus of Morehouse College. King's casket was borne on a farm cart drawn by two mules, symbolic of the Poor People's Campaign. At Morehouse, college president emeritus Benjamin Mays gave a brief eulogy before King was buried next to his grandparents at South View Cemetery.

King's widow, Coretta Scott King, founded the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change in order to carry on her husband's work and honor his memory. She purchased property on Auburn Avenue east of Ebenezer Baptist Church for this purpose. King's remains were moved to a commemorative site at the Center in 1971. The King Center complex was completed in 1981 and includes King's marble tomb and surrounding plaza, a library and archive, conference center, and exhibit areas. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

125th St. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

125th St..Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images.

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

125th Street is a two-way street that runs east-west in the New York City borough of Manhattan, considered the "Main Street" of Harlem; It is also called Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard.

125th St..Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

125th St..Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

The western part of the street runs diagonally through the neighborhood of Manhattanville from the north-west from an interchange with the Henry Hudson Parkway at 130th Street. East of Morningside Avenue it runs east-west through central Harlem to an interchange with F.D.R. Drive by the East River, where it becomes the Manhattan leg of the Triborough Bridge. Many sections of the street have been gentrified and developed with such stores as Old Navy, H&M, CVS/pharmacy, and Magic Johnson Theaters. The historical Apollo Theater is here.

West of Convent Avenue, 125th Street was re-routed on to the old Manhattan Avenue. The original 125th Street west of Convent Avenue was swallowed up to make the super-blocks where the low income housing projects now exist. What remains of the original alignment of 125th Street is called La Salle Street, which runs between Amsterdam Avenue and Claremont Avenue.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, 125th Street (Manhattan)

President Visits Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Library VIDEO PODCAST and Ebenezer Baptist Church and Nanotechnology innovation may revolutionize gene detection in a single cell

Monday, January 21, 2008

Ebenezer Baptist Church,

Ebenezer Baptist Church,. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. Ownership: Information presented on this website Martin Luther King, Jr. NHS: Historic Resource Study, unless otherwise indicated, is considered in the public domain.

Disclaimer: Information presented on this website U.S. Department of the Interior is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credit is requested.

Ebenezer Baptist Church, located at 407-413 Auburn Avenue, is part of a tradition of church building that existed in the Sweet Auburn community in the first decades of the twentieth century. Big Bethel A.M.E. Church of 1904 and 1924, located at 220 Auburn Avenue,

Wheat Street Baptist Church of 1920-1923, located at 365 Auburn Avenue, and Ebenezer of 1914-1922, are substantial buildings erected by a prosperous black community and built in the popular styles of their day. That these buildings soar above Auburn Avenue suggests both their spiritual importance and their place in the early twentieth century Sweet Auburn skyline.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

Ebenezer Baptist Church, Interior, view from behind pulpitMartin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site, Ebenezer Baptist Church, 407 Auburn Avenue Northeast, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA. Interior, view from behind pulpit, looking toward balcony.

Historic American Buildings Survey< #HABS GA-2169-F. Library of Congress call #HABS GA,61-ATLA,54-2. The records in HABS/HAER were created for the U.S. Government and are considered to be in the public domain.

Creator: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Historic American Buildings Survey. Source: U.S. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division "Built in America" Collection, reproduction number HABS GA-2169-F. Copyright: "The records in HABS/HAER were created for the U.S. Government and are considered to be in the public domain.

Ebenezer was designed in the Gothic Revival style of architecture. Popular in the United States as a residential style from 1840-1880, Gothic Revival remained a common choice for ecclesiastical buildings well into the twentieth century. Although Gothic forms never completely disappeared in English church architecture, Gothic reemerged as a style of architecture during the middle of the eighteenth century with the work of William Kent and Horace Walpole.

Nearly a century later, it was promoted in the United States by Alexander Jackson Davis. Its popularity increased, however, through the work of Andrew Jackson Downing, whose pattern books, Cottage Residences, Rural Architecture and Landscape Gardening of 1842 and The Architecture of Country Houses of 1850, circulated widely.

Lyndhurst, the Tarrytown, New York residence designed by Davis in 1838 and 1865, and Richard Upjohn's Trinity Church in New York City of 1839-1846 are among the most influential buildings of the period and include such elements as pointed-arched window openings, wall buttresses, towers, castellated parapets, and steeply pitched roofs. Toward the end of the nineteenth century, Upjohn's archeological approach to church design gave way to more eclectic church buildings. Later Gothic Revival churches include both traditional Gothic design elements, elements borrowed from other styles, and original motifs.

Ebenezer is a two-story, rectangular brick church with two large towers at each end of the Auburn Avenue facade (photograph 24). These towers flank a steeply pitched gable roof that contains two pairs of cross gables. The southernmost pair corresponds to a transept and contains a large, three-part Gothic window in each gable end. The brickwork at the lower level is covered with gray stucco and scored to resemble stone.

The main facade is essentially divided into three bays. The towers, which comprise the two outer bays, are buttressed at the first and second levels and contain stained glass and louvered lancet windows. Merlons are located in the corners of the tower parapets. The center bay contains the main entrance at ground level, three narrow, stained-glass windows at the second level, and a three-part Gothic window in the gable end.

Two-story buttresses divide the side elevations into nine bays, with the tower comprising the northernmost bay and the chancel expressed in the southernmost bay. These bays are punctuated at the lower level by segmental-arched windows with the second-floor bays marked by tall, stained-glass windows. Brick panels mark the division between the first and second floors.

The rear elevation has been largely obscured by a one-story, hip-roofed addition built in 1971. An oculus, located high in the gable end, remains visible. The two-story Education Building, constructed in 1956 and rehabilitated in 1971, similarly obscures the east elevation. Brick beltcourses, panels, corbels, and window hoods ornament the front and side elevations of Ebenezer and to a lesser extent the Education Building. Brick ornamentation of this type is common in public and commercial buildings throughout the Sweet Auburn community from the early part of the twentieth century through the 1930s.

The church auditorium is located at the second level, above the below-grade meeting hall. It is an open, rectangular space, with the pulpit and choir elevated on a platform and a balcony across the rear of the sanctuary. The walls are white plaster, and the pitched ceiling is pressed metal, also painted white. The gently sloped floor is oak and contains a central and two narrower side ranks of pews. Transepts feature stained glass portraits of Rev. A. D. Williams and Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr. Martin Luther King, Jr. NHS: Historic Resource Study.

Monday, February 12, 2007

Black History Month, Martin Luther King, LBJ

Martin Luther King and LBJ. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. Description: Martin Luther King, Jr. at the White House with Lyndon Johnson, March 18, 1966. By Yoichi Okamoto. Keywords: civil rights, Credit: Lyndon Baines Johnson Library. High Resolution Image

White House Photo by Yoichi Okamoto is Public Domain. Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. from the U.S. Copyright Office.

About the photographer: Yoichi Okamoto (1915–1985) Born in Yonkers, New York, Yoichi Okamoto was educated at Colgate University. After serving as a still-and motion-picture photographer in the U.S. Army in World War II, he headed the Army's Signal Corps's photo office in occupied Austria and then worked briefly as a photographer for a newspaper in Syracuse, New York. Mr. Okamoto then joined the United States Information Agency (USIA) serving as staff photographer in USIA posts in Germany and Austria, and eventually as chief of the Visual Materials Branch in Washington, DC.

Martin Luther King, Jr. at the White House with Lyndon Johnson

Two of his photographs were chosen for the landmark 1955 Museum of Modern Art's photography exhibition "The Family of Man." In 1961, Mr. Okamoto accompanied Vice President Lyndon Johnson on an official visit to West Berlin. Mr. Johnson was so impressed with Mr. Okamoto's work that he was asked to join the Vice President on several other trips. When Mr. Johnson became President, he appointed Mr. Okamoto White House photographer. After President Johnson left office in 1969, Mr. Okamoto founded a custom photo studio in Washington, DC.

Yoichi Okamoto's photography reveals a gift for capturing his subject's personality. This is especially true of his work as White House photographer, where he gained unprecedented access to Lyndon Johnson. Mr. Okamoto was able to anticipate the President's changeable moods, and his candid images tell us much about LBJ's personal political style. His goal, he told President Johnson, was not just to take portraits, but "to hang around and try to document history in the making." In his other government work, Mr. Okamoto demonstrated a strong appreciation for setting and context. His images of Washington, DC, and Munich, Germany, for example, show us the joys and irritations of urban life.

Yoichi Okamoto's photography is well represented in the holdings of the National Archives. In addition to his White House photographs that are preserved at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library in Austin, Texas, his work as a USIA staff member, as well as some of his later freelance photographs, are among USIA photographic files at the National Archives at College Park. In 1973, Mr. Okamoto completed several assignments for the Environmental Protection Agency's DOCUMERICA project. These photographs and some of his letters are also found in THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES.

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Monday, December 25, 2006

Martin Luther King's Birthday 2

Martin Luther King Jr. January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968, I Have a Dream Address at March on Washington, FULL STREAMING VIDEO. August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C

Martin Luther King's Birthday 2. American Forces Information Service.Privacy & Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service.
Martin Luther King's Birthday 3. American Forces Information Service.The Defense Visual Information Directorate. Information presented on DoD Imagery Server is considered public information.
Martin Luther King's Birthday 4. American Forces Information Service.except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.
About Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. from the U.S. Copyright Office.

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Saturday, December 23, 2006

Martin Luther King's Birthday

Martin Luther King Jr. January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. I Have a Dream Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C.

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About Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

Martin Luther King's Birthday

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Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity.

But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

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Monday, February 20, 2006

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X Black History Month

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X Black History Month. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images.

Creator(s): Trikosko, Marion S., photographer. Date Created/Published: [1964 March 26] Medium: 1 photographic print.

Digital ID: cph 3d01847 Source: b and w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ6-1847 (b and w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve higher resolution TIFF (12.5mb) (68 kilobytes)

MEDIUM: 1 photographic print., CREATED, PUBLISHED: (1964 March 26), NOTES: U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection.


TITLE: [Martin Luther King and Malcolm X waiting for press conference], CALL NUMBER: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 11695, frame 27 item [P amd P], REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ6-1847 (b and w film copy neg.), No known retrictions on publication.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (b and w film copy neg.) cph 3d01847, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/, CARD #: 92522562 Subjects: King, Martin Luther,--Jr.,--1929-1968--Public appearances. X, Malcolm, -- 1925 - 1965 -- Public appearances.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ6-1847]

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

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