Saturday, August 30, 2008

Louis Armstrong Stadium National Tennis Center

Louis Armstrong Stadium

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Description 2006 U.S. Open. Louis Armstrong Stadium a tennis stadium of the US Open, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, Date August 31 2006. Author: Alexisrael
Licensing: Public domain I Alexisrael, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I Alexisrael grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

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This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details may not fully reflect the modified file.
Camera manufacturer - EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
Camera model - KODAK CX6330 ZOOM DIGITAL CAMERA
Exposure time - 1/350 sec (0.00285714285714)
F Number - f/5.6
Date and time of data generation - 17:34, 31 August 2006
Lens focal length - 5.6 mm
Orientation - Normal
Horizontal resolution - 230 dpi
Vertical resolution - 230 dpi
Software used - Adobe Photoshop CS2 Windows

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Friday, August 29, 2008

Governor Sarah Heath Palin

Governor Sarah Heath Palin

Governor Sarah Heath Palin (Official Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mac Metcalfe, Alaska Army National Guard)
Gov. Sarah Palin Visits Kuwait While visiting with Alaska Army National Guard Soldiers at a dining facility in Kuwait , Gov. Palin was asked to address a group of Soldiers who were not from Alaska.
She took questions and shared information about our great state. Standing next to Palin is Maj. Simon Brown, executive officer for the 3rd Battalion, 297th Infantry, Alaska Army National Guard. Brown is from Wasilla, Alaska.

Alaska Department of Military & Veterans Affairs PO Box 5800 Fort Richardson, AK 99505-5800

This image is a work of a U.S. Army soldier or employee, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

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Stephanie Tubbs Jones

Stephanie Tubbs Jones

Image, Congressional Pictorial Directory, 109th.
Stephanie Tubbs Jones a Representative from Ohio; born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, September 10, 1949; graduated from Collinwood High School, Cleveland, Ohio; B.A., Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1971; J.D., Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, Ohio, 1974; elected to Cleveland, Ohio, municipal court, 1981; judge, Court of Common Pleas of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 1983-1991; prosecutor, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 1991-1998; elected as a Democrat to the One Hundred Sixth and to the four succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1999-present); chair, Committee on Standards of Official Conduct (One Hundred Tenth Congress); died on August 20, 2008, in Cleveland, Ohio. bioguide.congress.gov

This United States Congress image is in the public domain. This may be because it is an official Congressional portrait, because it was taken by an official employee of the Congress, or because it has been released into the public domain and posted on the official websites of a member of Congress. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

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Thursday, August 28, 2008

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C

Access Restriction(s): Unrestricted. Use Restriction(s): Unrestricted Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [A wide-angle view of marchers along the mall, showing the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument.], 08/28/1963. ARC Identifier 542045 / Local Identifier 306-SSM-4D(80)10. Item from Record Group 306: Records of the U.S. Information Agency, 1900 - 1992.

Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. PHONE: 301-837-3530; FAX: 301-837-3621; EMAIL: stillpixorder@nara.gov. Creator(s): U.S. Information Agency. Press and Publications Service. (ca. 1953 - ca. 1978) Type(s) of Archival Materials: Photographs and other Graphic Materials

Contact(s): Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. PHONE: 301-837-3530; FAX: 301-837-3621; EMAIL: stillpixorder@nara.gov. Production Date(s): 08/28/1963. Part Of: Series: Miscellaneous Subjects, Staff and Stringer Photographs, compiled 1961 - 1974 Access Restriction(s):

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.

Unrestricted. Use Restriction(s): Unrestricted

Variant Control Number(s): NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-306-SSM-4D(80)10

RELATED: Tags: Public Domain Clip Art and clip art or public domain and I Have a Dream.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Roger Federer

Roger FedererDescription Roger Federer At The 2002 U.S. Open. Author Original: Alexisrael / Modified version: Bella B.

Licensing Public domain, I, Alexisrael the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I Alexisrael grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.



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Orientation - Normal
Horizontal resolution - 200 dpi
Vertical resolution- 200 dpi
Software used - Adobe Photoshop CS2 Windows
File change date and time - 10:21, 27 May 2007
Color space - sRGB

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Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Serena Williams



Serena Jameka Williams (born September 26, 1981) is an American former World No. 1 ranked female tennis player who has won eight Grand Slam singles titles and two Olympic gold medals in women's doubles. She is currently the top ranked American female player. She is the most recent player, male or female, to have held all four Grand Slam singles titles simultaneously. Serena Williams From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Description Serena Williams serves at Wimbledon, on Centre Court, against Justine Henin. Date 2007-07-04. Author: Clavecin

Licensing: I, Clavecin, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I Clavecin grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Serena Williams

Metadata: This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details may not fully reflect the modified file.

Camera manufacturer - FUJIFILM. Camera model - FinePix F650. Exposure time - 1/80 sec (0.0125) F Number - f/4.7. Date and time of data generation - 18:20, 4 July 2007. Lens focal length - 29 mm.

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Monday, August 25, 2008

Ana Ivanović

Ana IvanovićDescription Ana Ivanović at the 2008 Australian Open Source. English Wikipedia Date 22 January 2008 Author: Eklektekuria
This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its author, Eklektekuria at the English Wikipedia project. This applies worldwide.

In case this is not legally possible: Eklektekuria grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Metadata

This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details may not fully reflect the modified file.
Camera manufacturer - Panasonic
Camera model - DMC-FZ30
Exposure time - 1/1000 sec (0.001)
F Number - f/4
Date and time of data generation - 19:45, 22 January 2008
Lens focal length - 88.8 mm

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Sunday, August 24, 2008

American Olympic team with Jim Thorpe

American Olympic team with Jim ThorpeDigital ID: ggbain 11987 Source: digital file from original neg. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ggbain-11987 (digital file from original negative) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.
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TITLE: 1912 American Olympic team (with Jim Thorpe, 4th from right) CALL NUMBER: LC-B2- 2569-13[P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-ggbain-11987 (digital file from original negative) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication.

SUMMARY: Photo related to the 5th Olympic Games, held in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1912. (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2008)

MEDIUM: 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. CREATED, PUBLISHED: [1912] CREATOR: Bain News Service, publisher.

NOTES: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Temp. note: Batch three loaded.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from original neg.) ggbain 11987 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.11987 CONTROL #: ggb2005012214

MARC Record Line: 540 No known restrictions on publication.

Jacobus Franciscus "Jim" Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk) from Oklahoma: Wa-Tho-Huk) (May 28, 1888 – March 28, 1953) was an American athlete. Considered one of the most versatile athletes in modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals in the pentathlon and decathlon, played American football collegiately and professionally, and also played professional baseball and basketball. Jim Thorpe From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Saturday, August 23, 2008

Joe Biden

Joe BidenThis United States Congress image is in the public domain. This may be because it is an official Congressional portrait, because it was taken by an official employee of the Congress, or because it has been released into the public domain and posted on the official websites of a member of Congress.
Senator Biden grew up in New Castle County, Delaware. He graduated from the University of Delaware in 1965, and from the Syracuse University College of Law in 1968. Prior to his election to the Senate, Biden practiced law in Wilmington, Delaware and served on the New Castle County Council from 1970 to 1972. Since 1991, Biden has been an adjunct professor at the Widener University School of Law, where he teaches a seminar on constitutional law. He is a proud graduate of Archmere Academy, class of 1961.

Senator Biden lives in Wilmington, Delaware and commutes to Washington, DC when the Senate is in session. He is married to Dr. Jill Biden, the former Jill Jacobs, an educator in Delaware's schools for over twenty years. She currently is a professor teaching at Delaware Technical Community College. Senator Biden is the father of three children: Beau, Hunter and Ashley. Beau serves as Delaware's Attorney General, Ashley is a social worker and Hunter is a lawyer. The Bidens also have five grandchildren: Naomi, Finnegan, Roberta Mabel, Natalie, and Robert Hunter.

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Friday, August 22, 2008

Olympic Basketball LeBron James

Olympic Basketball LeBron JamesU.S. Olympic Men's Basketball team member LeBron James goes up for a shot against China's Yao Ming, Sunday August 10th 2008., during action in the group B men's Olympic Basketball game between the U.S. and China,
at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. White House photo by Eric Draper.

This image is the work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As work of the U.S. federal government, this image is in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

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Thursday, August 21, 2008

Olympic Basketball Lisa Leslie

Olympic Basketball Lisa LeslieLisa Leslie and the U.S. women's Olympic Basketball team as seen in action in a preliminary round match Saturday August 9th 2008.
against the Czech Republic team at the Beijing, China Summer Olympic Games. White House Photo by Eric Draper.

This image is the work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As work of the U.S. federal government, this image is in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

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Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Olympics Opening Ceremonies National Stadium the Bird's Nest


Fireworks explode over China's National Stadium in Beijing, (the Bird's Hest) Friday night August 8, 2008 during the finale of the Opening Ceremonies for the 2008 Summer Olympics. White House Photo by Chris.

These images are works of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As works of the U.S. federal government, these images are in the public domain.
Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

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Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Olympics Opening Ceremonies Young Girl Flying

Olympics Opening Ceremonies Young Girl FlyingA young performer is suspended through the air during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games. Friday August the 8th, at the National Stadium in Beijing, China. White House photo by Eric Draper.
This image is the work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As work of the U.S. federal government, this image is in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

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Monday, August 18, 2008

Olympics Opening Ceremony Illuminated Sphere

Olympics Opening Ceremony Illuminated SpherePerformers dance on the surface of an Illuminated Sphere in the middle of National Stadium Friday August 8, 2008 during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2008 summer Olympic Games in Beijing, China. White House photo by Eric Draper.
This image is the work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As work of the U.S. federal government, this image is in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

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Sunday, August 17, 2008

Marcus Garvey

Marcus GarveyDigital ID: cph 3a03567 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ61-1854 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

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TITLE: Marcus Garvey, 1887-1940, CALL NUMBER: BIOG FILE - Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 [item] [P&P]. REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ61-1854 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication.

SUMMARY: Full lgth., seated at desk, facing right. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1924 Aug. 5. NOTES: Title and other information transcribed from unverified, old caption card data and item. George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Caption card tracings: BI; Shelf.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a03567 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a03567 CONTROL #: 2003653533

MARC Record Line: 540 No known restrictions on publication.

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Saturday, August 16, 2008

Michael Phelps

Michael Phelps U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps shows off his Olympic gold medal as he stands on the victory podium with teammate Ryan Lochte, bronze medalist,
and HungaryÕs Laszlo Cseh, silver medalist, at the National Aquatics Center in Beijing. White House photo by Eric Draper.
These images are works of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As works of the U.S. federal government, these images are in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.
Michael Phelps

Michael Phelps Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008, at the National Aquatics Center in Beijing. White House photo by Shealah Craighead
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Friday, August 15, 2008

Tiananmen Square (Gate of Heavenly Peace) Beijing, China

Tiananmen Square (Gate of Heavenly Peace) Beijing, ChinaPortrait of Chairman Mao Zedong at the Tiananmen Gate (Tiananmen literally, Gate of Heavenly Peace), Forbidden City, Beijing, China.

DF-21 IRBM TEL's at National Day Parade in Beijing. 1 October 1999. Image Credit: The Office of the Director of National Intelligence
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Copyright.

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The Tiananmen Gate was first built in the 1420s in the Ming Dynasty. During the demise of the Ming Dynasty, heavy fighting between Li Zicheng and the early Qing emperors damaged (or perhaps destroyed) the gate. The Tiananmen square was originally designed and built in Beijing in 1651. It was enlarged to its present size (four times its original size) and cemented over in 1958.

British and French troops who invaded Beijing in 1860 pitched camp near the gate and briefly considered burning the gate and the entire Forbidden City down. They decided ultimately to preserve the palace and to burn instead the emperor's Summer Palace. The Qing emperor eventually agreed to let the foreign powers establish headquarters in the area. During the Boxer Rebellion of 1900 the siege badly damaged the office complexes and several ministries were burnt down. In the conflict's denouement, the area became a space for foreign troops to assemble their armies and horses. It was cleared in due course to produce the beginning of what is now known as the Tiananmen Square. The Square, however, was not officially made until the PRC took power in 1949.

Near the centre of today's square, close to the site of the Mao Zedong Mausoleum, once stood one of the most important gates of Beijing. This gate was known as the "Great Ming Gate" during the Ming Dynasty, "Great Qing Gate" during the Qing Dynasty, and "Gate of China" during the Republic of China era. Unlike the other gates in Beijing, such as the Tiananmen and the Qianmen, this was a purely ceremonial gateway, with three arches but no ramparts, similar in style to the ceremonial gateways found in the Ming Dynasty Tombs.

This gate had a special status as the "Gate of the Nation", as can be seen from its successive names. It normally remained closed, except when the Emperor passed through. Commoner traffic was diverted to two side gates at the northern and eastern ends of today's square, respectively. Because of this diversion in traffic, a busy marketplace, called Chessgrid Streets developed in the big, fenced square to the south of this gate. In the early 1950s, the Gate of China (as it was then known) was demolished along with the Chessgrid Streets to the south, completing the expansion of Tiananmen Square to (approximately) its current size.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Tiananmen Square SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

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Thursday, August 14, 2008

Forbidden City Imperial Guardian Lion Beijing, China



Forbidden City Imperial Guardian Lion Beijing, China, clipart stock photo - Restrictions for Using NOAA Images, Most NOAA photos and slides are in the public domain (THIS IMAGE) and CANNOT be copyrighted.

Summer Palace at Beijing. Image ID: mvey0551, NOAA's Small World Collection. Location: People's Republic of China. Photo Date: 1979 Fall, Photographer: George Saxton, NESDIS, NOAA.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce unless otherwise instructed to give credit to the photographer or other source. NOAA Photo Library.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Forbidden City Imperial Guardian Lion Beijing, China

Chinese guardian lions, also called a Fu Lions, lions of Buddha, or sometimes stone lions in Chinese art, is a common representation of the lion in pre-modern China, which is believed to have powerful mythic protective powers that has traditionally stood in front of Chinese Imperial palaces, temples, emperors' tombs, government offices, and the homes of government officials and the wealthy from the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD), until the end of the empire in 1911.

Lions of Fo are often created in pairs, with the male playing with a ball and the female with a cub. They occur in many types of Chinese pottery and in Western imitations.

Pairs of Chinese guardian lions, also called Chinese stone lions are still common decorative and symbolic elements at the entrances to restaurants, hotels, supermarkets and other structures, with one sitting on each side of the entrance, in China and in other places around the world where the Chinese people have immigrated and settled specially in local Chinatowns.

In Tibet, the guardian lion is known as a Snow Lion and similar to Japanese shishi. In Myanmar they are called Chinthe and gave their name to the World War II Chindit soldiers.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Chinese guardian lions SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

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Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Gilded bronze guard lion Forbidden City, Beijing.China

Gilded bronze guard lion Forbidden City, Beijing.ChinaThe Forbidden City at Beijing. Image ID: mvey0529, NOAA's Small World Collection. Location: People's Republic of China. Photo Date: 1979 Fall. Photographer: George Saxton, NESDIS, NOAA.

Gilded bronze guard lion outside of the Gate of Celestial Purity (Qianqingmen), entrance to the Inner Court, Forbidden City, Beijing.China.
The imperial palace complex Beijing, China. Was commissioned in 1406 by the Yongle emperor of the Ming dynasty, it was first occupied in 1420. It is known as "The Forbidden City" because access was denied to most subjects.

Lions in the Forbidden City occur in pairs, the female with cub symbolizing fertility of the royal family. The male with orb, representing the imperial power.

Bronze lions in front of a residence identify the occupant as an official. First rank officials have lions with 13 bumps on their heads. These decrease with the official's rank, eight being the least number of bumps on the head. Officials of rank seven and below were not allowed lions at their gates.

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Tuesday, August 12, 2008

The Summer Palace Beijing, China

The Summer Palace Beijing, ChinaThe Summer Palace at Beijing, China. Image ID: mvey0520, NOAA's Small World Collection. Location: People's Republic of China. Photo Date: 1979 Fall. Photographer: George Saxton, NESDIS, NOAA
Restrictions for Using NOAA Images, Most NOAA photos and slides are in the public domain (THIS IMAGE) and CANNOT be copyrighted.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce unless otherwise instructed to give credit to the photographer or other source. NOAA Photo Library

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

The Summer Palace or Yi he yuan is a palace in Beijing, China. The Summer Palace is mainly dominated by Longevity Hill (60 meters high) and the Kunming Lake. It covers an expanse of 2.9 square kilometers, three quarters of which is water. The central Kunming Lake covering 2.2 square kilometers was entirely man made and the excavated soil was used to build Longevity Hill. In its compact 70,000 square meters of building space, one finds a variety of palaces, gardens, and other classical-style architectural structures.

The Summer Palace started out life as the Garden of Clear Ripples (traditional Chinese: 清漪園; simplified Chinese: 清漪园; pinyin: Qīngyī Yuán) in 1750 (Reign Year 15 of Emperor Qianlong). Artisans reproduced the garden architecture styles of various palaces in China. Kunming Lake was created by extending an existing body of water to imitate the West Lake in Hangzhou. The palace complex suffered two major attacks--during the Anglo-French allied invasion of 1860 (with the Old Summer Palace also ransacked at the same time), and during the Boxer Rebellion, in an attack by the eight allied powers in 1900. The garden survived and was rebuilt in 1886 and 1902. In 1888, it was given the current name, Yihe Yuan. It served as a summer resort for Empress Dowager Cixi, who diverted 30 million taels of silver, said to be originally designated for the Chinese navy (Beiyang Fleet), into the reconstruction and enlargement of the Summer Palace.

In December 1998, UNESCO included the Summer Palace on its World Heritage List. It declared the Summer Palace "a masterpiece of Chinese landscape garden design. The natural landscape of hills and open water is combined with artificial features such as pavilions, halls, palaces, temples and bridges to form a harmonious ensemble of outstanding aesthetic value." It is a popular tourist destination but also serves as a recreational park.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Summer Palace SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

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Monday, August 11, 2008

The Forbidden City Beijing, China


I, Simm the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I Simm grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Forbidden City The Forbidden City was the Chinese imperial palace from the mid-Ming Dynasty to the end of the Qing Dynasty. It is located in the middle of Beijing, China, and now houses the Palace Museum. For almost five centuries, it served as the home of the Emperor and his household, as well as the ceremonial and political centre of Chinese government.

Built from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 surviving buildings with 8,707 bays of rooms and covers 720,000 square metres. The palace complex exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture, and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia and elsewhere. The Forbidden City was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987, and is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Since 1924, the Forbidden City has been under the charge of the Palace Museum, whose extensive collection of artwork and artifacts were built upon the imperial collections of the Ming and Qing dynasties. Part of the museum's former collection is now located in the National Palace Museum in Taipei. Both museums descend from the same institution, but were split after the Chinese Civil War.From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Sunday, August 10, 2008

The Samoyed

The SamoyedIn appearance lie is between a white spitz dog and a white Eskimo; in character he is one of the very nicest of dogs. He is of medium size, weighing about 40 pounds. He has a little of the width of jaw that characterizes the Chow and other Asiatic types,
and has the characteristic of all Arctic dogs of carrying his tail in a chrysanthemum like pompom on his back.

The fine dark eye, alertly pricked car, and deep, soft, white coat make him everywhere a conspicuous favorite. The feet are well protected from the cold by thick fur between the toes, almost covering the black pads.

While the dogs bred in England and America are all of the pure white or pale creamy type, black, black and white, and brown and white dogs are found among the wandering Samoyed people of Siberia and the Arctic shores of Russia and Nova Zembla.

The Samoyed is a compact, staunch little sledge dog, used by the Samoyed, a semi-nomadic race living in northeastern Russia and Siberia. These people keep herds of reindeer, and some of the dogs are used in rounding up and driving these animals, much as collies are used in caring for sheep and cattle.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Saturday, August 09, 2008

North Greenland Eskimo Dog

North Greenland Eskimo DogPolaris was chosen as our model of this type because he has been considered the most perfect North Greenland Eskimo dog known. He shows the light color so prevalent among the dogs of the extreme north on both continents, and the marked depth and breadth of muzzle. This seems to be a characteristic of many Asiatic dogs, the Chow and Tibetan mastiff notably, and may point to an Asiatic connection with Greenland via the Polar ice or across Arctic America.
There is a heavy, pale buff, deep-jawed dog found along the Arctic coast of America from the eastern to the western extent of land.

No white man living has had more experience with this breed than Admiral Robert E.
Peary, who frankly admits that if it had not been for the sledge dogs he never would have discovered the North Pole. lie is a firm believer in the pure-bred North Greenland Eskimo, which is practically a domesticated wolf, and most of the dogs which went to the Pole were of this type.

A puppy from these famous animals, secured by one of the coauthors of this article from Admiral Peary, was named "Polaris," and he developed into what Captain "Bob" Bartlett declared to be the finest living specimen of the breed.

Polaris weighed about 1OO pounds, but looked much larger, owing to his wonderful coat, which at its best measured nine inches long on the shoulder. The hair of the tail was 12 1/2 inches long. He took to the sledge and to the pack-saddle without any training whatever, and pulled a sledge three miles through deep snow the first time he was put in harness.

He was extremely gentle and affectionate with people and with a little Scotch terrier of ours, but a devil incarnate toward everything else that walked, flew, or swam. From grasshoppers and wild mice, through cats and pigs to sheep and cattle, there was nothing he could not or did not kill. Yet such was the magic of his smile, the twinkle of his eye, and the wheedling wave of his tail, that no one would believe anything against him unless he was caught in the act, which he usually wasn't.

He was finally presented to Dr. Wilfred Grenfell, and celebrated his arrival in Labrador by whipping every other dog in sight.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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Friday, August 08, 2008

Alaskan Eskimo Dogs

Alaskan Eskimo DogsThere is no set standard for Eskimo dogs, and nowadays one must go very far into the Arctic to find the packs pure and uncontaminated with the blood of the white man's dogs;
for the best huskie is the strongest, most willing, and obedient dog. whatever his lineage, and these qualities have undoubtedly been increased through the introduction of such strains as the Newfoundland, Dane, shepherd dog, and others of less pure but equally civilized blood.

There are a good many names for the Eskimo dogs and a good many types, as their range covers a stretch of country some 4,000 miles long and 1,500 miles wide. It is therefore easily understandable that the dog of the Aleutians and Alaska should present quite a different appearance from that of Hudson Bay or Greenland.

The typical Alaskan "huskie" is generally black or dark, with white and buff markings, distributed as shown in the plate. The brown leader is the famous dog Napoleon, from Nome, who went as leader to France in 1915. The white-faced dogs are "huskies"; the "masked" dog in the middle is a "malannite," and the pale dogs are of the North Greenland type.

All Eskimos are strong, wolfy, self-reliant dogs, with straight, strong legs, solid body, and massive head; even of jaw, keen of eye and ear, and well equipped by nature for the semi-feral life they lead among their nomadic masters. They have the pricked ears, deep furred neck, dense waterproof coat, well-furred feet, and gaily carried tail of all the Arctic and northern Asiatic dogs, and are represented by similar dogs across northern Lapland, Russia, and Siberia.

A good average weight for these dogs is about 70 pounds, though they often scale much more. They share with the Asiatic dogs the peculiar horizontal width of jaw so marked in the Chow. They are used by the Eskimos for pulling sledges and for hunting musk-ox and Polar bear which are overtaken and held at bay until the hunters arrive.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

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See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Thursday, August 07, 2008

The Spitz

The SpitzThe "wolf spitz" of the mid-Victorian fancier is now seldom seen in this country ; yet he is a very interesting dog, having much to do in the gradual evolution of many types popular today.
Almost unaltered except in size, we see him now as the popular toy Pomeranian his influence is easily seen in the saucy black schipperke there is little doubt that he has a share in the various shepherd dogs of central Europe, and one can see strong probability that this strain reappears in the fine dogs of the North, represented by the Samoyed and sled dogs of the Eastern and the Eskimos of the Western hemispheres, though it is not clear how it got there.

The true spitz is a dog weighing about 25 to 30 pounds, and the best dogs are white or cream-color, though fawn, brown, and even black dogs are found. The mixture of white in patches with any of these "self" colors is an unpardonable defect with the fancy.

They are bright, fascinating, pretty dogs ; but it must in candor be said they are very "choicy" in making friends and very ready to repel with sharp teeth any unwelcome advances by dogs or humans they don't know. They are apt to be a real responsibility to the owner on this account.

The Eskimo dog, Samoyed, spitz, and Chow-Chow, although differing in size and sometimes in color, probably had a common origin. Their dense coats show that they all properly belong in the North, and their straight, upright ears and general appearance betray their blood relationship to the wolf.

The spitz, usually solid white or solid black, has long been a favorite in Germany. Thirty or forty years ago it was popular in this country, but it is a dog of uncertain temper, and that may be one reason why it is no longer in favor, except in a reduced form as a toy dog.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Wednesday, August 06, 2008

Central High School Little Rock, Arkansas

Central High School Little Rock, ArkansasLittle Rock Central High School Photographer: NPS photo. Description: Front facade of Central High School. Properties: Size 1200 x 792 | FileSize 148. KB Download: 20060713180653.jpg
Image Ownership National Park Service: Information presented on this website, unless otherwise indicated , is considered in the public domain. It may may be distributed or copied as is permitted by the law.

Disclaimer U.S. Department of the Interior: Information presented on this website is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credit is requested.

The Crisis at Central High - On the morning of September 23, 1957 nine African-American teenagers stood up to an angry crowd protesting integration in front of Little Rock's Central High as they entered the school for the first time. This event, broadcast around the world, made Little Rock the site of the first important test of the U.S. Supreme Court’s historic Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision.

In the fall of 1957 Little Rock became the symbol of state resistance to school desegregation. Arkansas Governor Orval E. Faubus directly questioned the sanctity of the federal court system and the authority of the United States Supreme Court's desegregation ruling while nine African-American high school students sought an education at the all-white Little Rock Central High School.

The controversy in Little Rock was the first fundamental test of the United States resolve to enforce African-American civil rights in the face of massive southern defiance during the period following the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decisions. When President Dwight D. Eisenhower was compelled by white mob violence to use federal troops to ensure the rights of African-American children to attend the previously all-white school, he became the first president since the post-Civil War Reconstruction period to use federal troops in support of African-American civil rights. Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site

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Tuesday, August 05, 2008

Clumber Field and Cocker Spaniels

Clumber Field and Cocker SpanielsThese rather closely related dogs may, like the setters, be considered each in relation to the others. The clumber is the largest, weighing up to 65 pounds, though the average is probably about 50.
He is perhaps best described as a very low. heavily built English setter, all white
except for lemon or orange ears and eye patches, with ticking of the same on forelegs
and as little as possible elsewhere. He is a benign, affectionate creature and very sedate in manners.

As a gun-dog, he is used in England on woodcock, snipe, and other lowland birds, but
he has never been much used or bred in this country. The soft, deep eye shows considerable haw in mature dogs. The coat should be almost perfectly straight, and the tail, belly, and legs, down to the hocks, should be full feathered.

The cocker is the smallest of the three and is an active, playful, intelligent little dog, which takes on the spaniel dignity rather later in life than the clumber and the business like field spaniel. He gets his name, "cocker," from the use to which he was bred in hunting woodcock. They are easily trained to fowling, being already predisposed in scenting out and flushing grouse like birds (including the domestic hen). This tendency is taken advantage of and developed, to force grouse up into the trees, where they are easily shot.

The cocker rushes his bird and then barks and keeps it busy and preoccupied. If the hunter himself flushed the game, it would go far and probably not again be seen. The cocker should weigh from 18 to 24 pounds. In color he may be black, red, liver, or lemon, with or without white. These colors should be clear and pronounced, not pale or washed out, and if predominant over white should be virtually solid, the white being restricted to a mere dash on the chest.

If white predominates, the color should be solid on ears and face, except for the fore face and a blaze up the nose. In this case, color should be distributed about as in the English setter. The ears, while long, silky, and set low, should not reach beyond the nose when drawn forward. The legs must be strong, straight, and of good bone and not too short, and the squarely built body hard and muscular. They are admirable house-dogs, but when kept as such should be rather sparingly fed and kept in good trim. A fat spaniel is not an attractive object.

The field spaniel is much larger and stronger than the cocker, but not so restless. He is, however, more active and lively than the clumber. While not so thoughtful looking and sedate as the latter, he is highly intelligent, good natured, and obedient. His body is long and low, but he carries his head with an air of courage and determination. His coat is straight and silky, and his color may be solid black, solid liver, liver and white, black and white, black and tan, orange, or orange and white. The black and the liver are the colors preferred. The proper weight is from 30 to 45 pounds.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Monday, August 04, 2008

Louis Armstrong playing trumpet

Louis Armstrong playing trumpetTITLE: [Louis Armstrong, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left, playing trumpet]

Digital ID: cph 3c27236 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-127236 (b&w film copy neg.)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve unedited JPEG version (94 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (13 megabytes)

CALL NUMBER: NYWTS - BIOG--Armstrong, Louis "Satchmo"--Orchestra Leader [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-127236 (b&w film copy neg.)

RIGHTS INFORMATION: No copyright restriction known. Staff photographer reproduction rights transferred to Library of Congress through Instrument of Gift.

MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1953. NOTES: Forms part of: New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).

PART OF: New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c27236 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c27236 CONTROL #: 00652636

MARC Record Line: 540 a No copyright restriction known. Staff photographer reproduction rights transferred to Library of Congress through Instrument of Gift.

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Sunday, August 03, 2008

The Newfoundland and St. Bernard

The Newfoundland and St. BernardTwo dogs which rival the Eskimo in their ability to endure deep snow and extreme cold are the St. Bernard and the Newfoundland, both of which have become famous as savers of life.
Both are well-known subjects of the poet and the painter, who delight to record their heroic deeds or their simple fidelity. The Newfoundland has the further unique distinction among dogs of being figured on a postage stamp of his native land. He is a wonderful swimmer and is credited with saving many people from drowning.

It is a real pity that this noble, useful and typically american dog should have lost popularity to such an extent that now he is almost never seen

Only two strains arc preserved, so far as can be learned one in England and one
in New Jersey. Therefore it was a great pleasure as well as a great assistance in the making of the plate to meet face to face at the Westminster show of 1918 the straight descendant of the very dog whose photograph had been the artist's model.

The magnificent St. Bernard carries on better than any other breed the qualities that characterize the Newfoundland. For many years the breed, which had been perfected and stabilised in England, was used as a farmer's helper, having the intelligence needed for a herding dog and the weight and willingness to churn and do other real work.

His benignity and unquestioned gentleness made him a very desirable guard and companion for children, and his deep voice rather than his actual attack was usually a sufficient alarm against unwonted intrusions.

Aside from these tine qualities, however, his mere beauty and staunch dependability should have been sufficient to preserve him from the fate that seems to be almost accomplished.

Weighing from 120 to 150 pounds and standing 25 to 27 inches at the shoulder, the deep furred, massive headed, and kind-eyed Newfoundland was one of the most impressive of dogs.

He was strong, active, and leonine both in looks and in action, having a rolling, loosely knit gait. There were two recognized colors all black (white toes and breast spot were not defects, however) and white, with large black patches over the ears and eyes and on the body, the latter being known as Landseer Newfoundlands, because a dog of this type is the subject of Sir Edwin Landseer's well-known painting, "A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society."

The forehead was domed almost to the point of looking unnatural; the broad forehead,
deep jaw, flews, and dewlaps betokened a kind and gentle nature.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Saturday, August 02, 2008

Labrador and Chesapeake Retrievers Irish water spaniel

Labrador and Chesapeake Retrievers Irish water spanielMany breeds of dogs have been trained to find and bring in game which has been shot, but retrievers, as their name implies, are bred specially for that purpose.
English sportsmen had for some time been experimenting with different breeds in an effort to find a dog exactly suited for retrieving game, when, about the middle of the last century, there was introduced from Labrador a hardy, black-coated, small-eared, medium-sized dog, which seemed to answer the purpose. He was a typical water dog and not subject to ear canker, which so often develops in spaniels used to retrieve waterfowl.

This Labrador dog, crossed probably with the English setter, and perhaps with other
breeds, produced the retriever, which may be either black or liver brown. In size about like a pointer, covered all over with a coat of tight, curly hair, Astrakhan-like, except for his smooth head and face, he is a curious-looking dog.

He is a capable and teachable creature, however, and makes a capital assistant in the duck-blind or as a gun-dog, where birds are the quarry. The curly retriever may be either coal black or dark liver brown. He should weigh about 65 to 80 pounds. There is also a smooth retriever, which is much like the curly in form and size, but has straight hair.

The Labrador retriever is shorter of leg than the other types and generally more solidly built. It is generally some shade of brown, and none of the retrievers should show more than a trace of white on the chest. All have smaller ears than the pointer or setter, and the curly type carries his close to the head. The original "Labrador,"' or something very like, still exists under the same name, as a distinct and recognized breed. He has all the good qualities of both of these highly intelligent parents.

CHESAPEAKE RETRIEVER - This is an essentially American dog and has come to a high state of perfection along the eastern seaboard, and, as an introduced type, is much esteemed in the ducking marshes of the Northwest. His parentage is supposed to be chiefly otterhound and Labrador, but it is altogether probable that other blood runs in his veins, as he is one of the dogs that has been developed for a particular use through particular qualities his ancestors were found in actual practice to possess.

The result is a very curious, very excellent, but not very stable nor beautiful dog. But no known dog is such an unswervable retriever or can stand a fraction of the exposure to icy wind and icy water which this hardy fowling dog seems to revel in. To meet this rigorous demand, he has a curious, deep woolly undercoat that seems never to wet through, such as we find on water-dwelling mammals like the otter; this is protected and covered by a harsh, strong coat of regular hair, straight or slightly curly, from which one good shake drives practically all the water.

They will chase a wounded duck over or under the ice and will follow the liveliest "cripple" till it wearies. In open deep-water duck hunting such a dog is invaluable. They vary from 60 to So pounds in weight and from 22 to 25 inches in height. The ear is quite short and set rather high, giving a squarer look to the head than in the setter, which it remotely resembles. They are tawny brown or "sedge color" generally, though other less desirable colors are met with occasionally.

THE IRISH WATER SPANIEL - Identified more or less with the retrievers, because they perform similar duties, are the sporting spaniels, which, because they arc divided into so many branches, constitute perhaps the largest dog family in the world.

The English "Kennel Club" recognizes Irish water spaniels, water spaniels other than Irish, Clumber spaniels, Sussex spaniels, field spaniels. English springers, Welsh springers, and cocker spaniels. They are all used to assist the gunner to find his game and to retrieve it after it is shot.

The Irish water spaniel is in a class by himself. You need to see him but once to remember him forever. It is said that he was the very last dog to be made and that it was only by using the remnants of half a dozen other breeds that enough material was found of which to make him.

When he comes up to you for the first time, you'll probably laugh at him ; but don't laugh too long ; there'll be tears in your eyes if you do. For this quaint creature who looks as if he had borrowed from friends everything he has on, including his tail, has such an honest face, such a charming expression, and such a dignity of manner that he'll win your sympathy and your respect before the first smile of
amusement has left your face.

As a water dog, he is generally regarded as superior to any other member of his family, though most spaniels take kindly to the water. Formerly quite a popularly known dog for sniping and ducking, the old Irish water spaniel seems to have been almost entirely abandoned, and few are now seen in this country. Perhaps the uses to which he was put are more satisfactorily met by the setters and retrievers, both of which are stronger and heavier and can equal him in work in the water.

The type of this breed should weigh about 50 pounds and be of a uniform liver-color.
The coat is quite long and tightly curled, but by no means woolly. It is long on the crown, but the face, front of hind legs, and most of the tail should be clothed in short, soft, rather dull hair, giving the appearance of having been clipped.

It is very different in appearance from the land spaniel of the cocker type, being in shape and size not greatly unlike the poodle, but differing much from this breed in texture of coat and in the perfectly smooth face. In disposition it is like both the poodle and the spaniels generally — kind, affectionate, playful, and bright, but showing a strong tendency to be a little aloof with strangers.

They have also a strong trend toward obesity in age, when they become heavy, untidy, and decrepit.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Friday, August 01, 2008

The English and American Foxhound

The English and American FoxhoundThe English foxhound for more than 300 years has been one of the principal factors in the great English sport of fox-hunting. Perhaps no other single sport has done so much to mold the national character.
The dogs in packs follow the fox across country, and the fox- hunters, under the direction of a "master of foxhounds," ride after them. The fine qualities developed by hard riding, by facing all kinds of weather, and by the dangers incident to jumping high fences and wide ditches, coupled with the sportsmanly behavior which constitutes the etiquette of the hunting field, were just the traits required to make gallant soldiers and successful colonists.

The English foxhound, while of ancient lineage and highly standardized in England, has not been found to meet exactly the requirements of the rougher sport in this country. Thus, through the efforts of a few assiduous fox-hunters, there has been produced a somewhat rangier, lighter, and more courageous dog, known as the American foxhound. The lighter built and more speedy American foxhound is used either in packs, followed by mounted hunters, as in England, or singly, or in couples, to drive the fox within range of a gun.

The development of this breed has been largely due to the initiative and energy of a few men, notably Mr. Harry W. Smith, of Worcester. Massachusetts, in the North, and Brigadier General Roger D. Williams, of Lexington, Kentucky, in the South.

In essentials the American and English breeds are, of course, very similar. The English dog is a little squarer and more pointer-like in the head, with shorter ears and straighter, longer legs. Our dog seems more like a hound to us, with its fuller leather and more elastic pastern and hock and stifle. The English dog looks rather stiff and stilty in comparison, though undoubtedly just what the Englishman wants. And surely the English huntsman knows just exactly what he wants.

The hound is a very primative type od dog and one of the proofs of this is his unvarying and rigid adherence to his pattern of color. White of course is not natural but the result of ages of domestication, and may occur anywhere on a dog, as partial albinism, without regard to symmetry or rule.

It will be found, however, that through all the ages nothing has been able to upset the fundamental pattern on all the hound like dogs, which we see preserved in its purity in the black and tan bloodhound. White may supplant it anywhere, but if there is color it will invariably fall according to this design.

Thus beagles, foxhounds, and many other dogs with hound blood in them will without exception have their black marks in the proper area for black to come, and their tan marks likewise, whether they come in large patches or as ticks or flecks of color in a white ground. The drawings show the main characteristics of the two types, as well as their markings.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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