Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Wall Of Pumpkins Halloween

Wall Of Pumpkins Halloween

Wall Of Pumpkins Halloween
Wall Of Pumpkins. Fall brings harvest and Halloween to the green grocers in New York City, like this one on the northeast corner of 57th street and 9th avenue.

Taken looking east from 9th avenue on September 25, 2008.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Monday, September 29, 2008

Rosh Hashanah, Man wearing tallit with boy in New York City



Rosh Hashanah, Man wearing tallit with boy in New York City. TITLE: Jewish life and customs (Rosh Hashanah), New York City, ca. CALL NUMBER: LOT 10892 (F) [P&P] RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication. SUMMARY: Man, wearing tallit, looking at the TANAKH with boy in New York City.

SUMMARY: Photographs show Jewish life and customs, New York City, ca. 1905-15. Celebrating Jewish New Year; peddlers; character portraits; receiving free matzohs; exhibition of Jewish Farmers of America, 1909.

Digital ID: cph 3b41830 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-95685 (b&w film copy neg.) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (1,492 kilobytes). MEDIUM: ca. 38 photographic prints. CREATED/PUBLISHED: ca, 1905-1915.

Rosh Hashanah, Man wearing tallit

NOTES: This record contains unverified, old data from shelflist card. Forms part of the George Grantham Bain Collection. Photos mounted and captioned. Purchase; D.J. Culver; 1948.

DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b41830 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b41830. VIDEO FRAME ID: LCPP003B-41830. CONTROL #: 91790585. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. CONTROL #: 2005675256.

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication. Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-95685]

Tags: Public Domain Clip Art clip art public domain Rosh Hashanah

Sunday, September 28, 2008

Temple of Heaven Beijing China

Temple of Heaven Beijing ChinaDigital ID: cph 3c17303 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-117303 (b&w film copy neg.)

Retrieve Unedited JPEG version (117 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (12 megabytes)
TITLE: [Temple of Heaven, Peking(sic), China] CALL NUMBER: LOT 11356-1 [P&P] Check for an online group record (may link to related items)

The Temple of Heaven, literally the Altar of Heaven, a complex of Taoist buildings situated in southeastern urban Beijing, in Xuanwu District. The temple complex was constructed from 1406 to 1420 during the reign of the Yongle Emperor, who was also responsible for the construction of the Forbidden City in Beijing. The complex was extended and renamed Temple of Heaven during the reign of the Jiajing Emperor in the 16th century.

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-117303 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print.

CREATED/PUBLISHED: [between ca. 1880 and 1923] NOTES: Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection (Library of Congress). DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c17303 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c17303. CONTROL #: 96521623

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-33530]

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Saturday, September 27, 2008

The Empire State Building Near and Far

The Empire State Building Near and Far

The Empire State Building Near and Far
The Empire State Building Near and Far - 350 5th avenue, looking west snd up from across the avenue.


Looking north from 21st street and Broadway toward the 102-story Art Deco skyscraper at 33d street, which was completed in 1931.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Friday, September 26, 2008

University of Mississippi, Geology and Lyceum Buildings

University of Mississippi, Geology and Lyceum Buildings

University of Mississippi, Geology and Lyceum Buildings
Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record. The records in HABS/HAER were created for the U.S. Government and are considered to be in the public domain. The Library of Congress is not aware of any U.S. copyright protection (see Title 17 U.S.C.) or any other restrictions in the HABS/HAER materials.

University of Mississippi, Geology Building, University Circle, Oxford, Lafayette County, MS.

University of Mississippi, Lyceum Building, University Circle, Oxford, Lafayette County, MS.

COLLECTION: Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress). REPOSITORY:
Library of Congress, Prints and Photograph Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DATE: Documentation compiled after 1933.

RELATED: James Meredith at the University of Mississippi

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Thursday, September 25, 2008

Black Spotted Butterfly Close-up

Black Spotted Butterfly

Black Spotted Butterfly
Black Spotted Butterfly Close-up on red flowers in Central Park New York City, July 29, 2008

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Wednesday, September 24, 2008

the Third Cemetery of The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Shearith Israel

the Third Cemetery of The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Shearith Israel

the Third Cemetery of The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Shearith Israel

the Third Cemetery of The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Shearith Israel
the Third Cemetery of The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Shearith Israel in the City of New York 1829 - 1851.

Shearith Israel was the only Jewish congregation in New York City from 1654 until 1825. Shearith Israel was founded by 23 Jews, mostly of Spanish and Portuguese origin.

This is looking south at 98-110 West 21st Street just west of 6th avenue. The cemetery is between loft buildings and across the street from the School Of Visual Arts. It was built adjacent to the congregation's synagogue on 19th Street--built in 1860 and now long gone. Today their synagogue is at 99 Central Park West and Cemetery in Glendale, Queens, New York

The plot contains an estimated one hundred and fifty graves.
Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Horse Mounted Police New York City

Horse Mounted Police in New York City. Looking north up Madison Ave. mounted police cross the avenue at 51st street from east to west, September 23, 2008 during the annual meeting of the United Nations General Assembly

Mounted police Near the Waldorf Astoria Hotel on the east side of Park Avenue stand watch on the west side of the avenue as Tibetan supporters protest the arrival of Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao for the United Nations General Assembly session.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Horse Mounted Police New York City

Horse Mounted Police New York City

Monday, September 22, 2008

Nathan Hale

Nathan Hale

Nathan Hale
“I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.”

Nathan Hale, 1776: Biography and Memorials, By Henry Phelps Johnston, Published by The De Vinne Press, 1901, Original from Harvard University, Digitized Jul 27, 2006, 208 pages.

This 13-foot standing bronze figure, sculpted by Frederick MacMonnies (1863-1937), faces New York's City Hall in City Hall Park and honors the last moments of the 21-year-old American Revolution era spy, Nathan Hale (1755-1776).

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

The original work shown in this image is also free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris, in this case 1937) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.
RELATED: Tags: and or and

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Hurricane Ike

Hurricane IkeHurricane Ike covered more than half of Cuba in this image, taken by the Expedition 17 crew aboard the International Space Station from a vantage point of 220 statute miles above Earth.
The center of Ike was near 22.4 degrees north latitude and 82.4 degrees west longitude and moving 290 degrees at 11.7 miles per hour. High Resolution Image

Ike came ashore in Texas at 2:10 a.m. CDT, Sept. 13 and brought a wall of water over 20 feet high, sweeping through Galveston Island, and on the mainland. The storm made landfall with sustained winds near 110 mph, just 1 mph short of a Category 3 hurricane.

One of the station's solar arrays is partially visible in the upper right corner.

Image Credit: NASA, As work of the U.S. federal government, this image is in the public domain.

Note: This only applies to works of the Federal Government and not to the work of any individual U.S. state, territory, commonwealth, county, municipality, or any other subdivision.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

NASA still images; audio files; video; and computer files used in the rendition of 3-dimensional models, such as texture maps and polygon data in any format, generally are not copyrighted (THIS IMAGE).

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services.

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Saturday, September 20, 2008

B-17 Flying Fortress



Boeing B-17E. (U.S. Air Force photo). Information presented on www.nationalmuseum.af.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

Boeing B-17G-40-VE (S/N 42-97991) in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo).

The B-17G was the result of an almost continuous improvement program of earlier B-17 models. The G model was basically the production version of the B-17F after the modifications and improvements were incorporated into the design.

Although the Bendix chin turret is the most obvious improvement incorporated into the B-17G, it was actually first used on late model B-17Fs. More than 8,500 Gs were built by three different manufacturers: Boeing, Douglas and Lockheed-Vega. More than 12,500 B-17s of all types were built before production ended.

B-17 Flying Fortress

B-17 Flying Fortress

The Flying Fortress is one of the most famous airplanes ever built. The B-17 prototype first flew on July 28, 1935. Although few B-17s were in service on Dec. 7, 1941, production quickly accelerated after the U.S. entry into World War II. The aircraft served in every combat zone, but it is best known for the daylight strategic bombing of German industrial targets. Production ended in May 1945 and totaled 12,726.

SPECIFICATIONS: Span: 103 ft. 9 in. Length: 74 ft. 9 in. Height: 19 ft. 1 in. Weight: 65,500 lbs. gross weight (actual - normal load) Armament: 12 .50-cal. machine guns and 8,000 lbs. of bombs. Engines: Four Wright R-1820-97 turbo-supercharged radials of 1200 hp each

PERFORMANCE: Maximum speed: 302 mph at 25,000 ft. Cruising speed: 160 mph. Service ceiling: 35,600 ft. Range: 3,400 miles (maximum ferry range)

Tags: Public Domain Clip Art and clip art or public domain and B-17 Flying Fortress or BOEING.

Friday, September 19, 2008

Flatiron Building New York City

Flatiron Building The building, at 175 Fifth Avenue New York City, looking south from 24th street and Broadway near Madison Square Park, late summer 2008.

Designed by Chicago's Daniel Burnham in the Beaux-Arts style. Like a classical Greek column, with limestone and glazed terra-cotta fa├žade
It was one of the first buildings to use a steel skeleton, At the rounded tip, the triangular tower is only 6.5 feet wide. The 22-story building is 285 ft tall.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

RELATED: Flatiron Building

Thursday, September 18, 2008

New York Public Library Lions Patience and Fortitude

New York Public Library Lions Patience

Patience

New York Public Library Lions Fortitude

Fortitude
New York Public Library Lions Patience and Fortitude. The marble lions were designed by sculptor Edward Clark Potter and carved from Tennessee Pink marble by the Piccirilli Brothers in 1911.

Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia named the Library mascots Patience and Fortitude for the attributes he thought every New Yorker should possess.
Sculptor Edward Clark Potter obtained the commission for the lions on the recommendation of August Saint-Gaudens, one of America's foremost sculptors. Potter was paid $8,000 for the modelling, and Piccirilli Brothers executed the carving for $5,000, using pink Tennessee marble.

Patience guards the south side of the Library's steps and Fortitude sits to the north before the Beaux-Arts building of The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street in Manhattan.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States

September 17, 1787 – The United States Constitution is signed in Philadelphia.Delegates at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 prepare to sign the U.S. Constitution at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2008/09/scene-at-signing-of-constitution-of.html

Credit: "Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States" by artist Howard Chandler Christy

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF.

This image is however not in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Howard Chandler Christy (January 10, 1873 – March 3, 1952), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day, (december 31st) of that year.. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution

Tags: Public Domain Clip Art and clip art or public domain and Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Federal Reserve Building, Washington, D.C.

Federal Reserve Building, Washington, D.C.TITLE: Federal Reserve Building, Washington, D.C.

Digital ID: cph 3a12043 Source: digital file from b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-9583 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve unedited JPEG version (154 kilobytes)
TITLE: Federal Reserve Building, Washington, D.C. CALL NUMBER: FSA/OWI COLL - D 2138 [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-9583 (b&w film copy neg.)

RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication. SUMMARY: Photograph shows a fountain and entrance to the building. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED, PUBLISHED: 1941.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (digital file from b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a12043 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a12043. CONTROL #: 2007675690.

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-9583]

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Monday, September 15, 2008

New York Stock Exchange

New York Stock ExchangeTITLE: New York Stock Exchange, Broad Street

Digital ID: cph 3c24933 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-124933 (b&w film copy neg.). Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve unedited JPEG version (144 kilobytes)
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (12 megabytes)
CALL NUMBER: LOT 3788, box 6 [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-124933 (b&w film copy neg.) MEDIUM: 1 photographic print.

CREATED/PUBLISHED: c1908. CREATOR: Underhill, Irving, d. 1960, photographer. NOTES: H111802 U.S. Copyright Office. No. C 6612. Copyright by Irving Underhill, N.Y. (EXPIRED) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No copyright renewal.

Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c24933 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c24933. CONTROL #: 00650325

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Sunday, September 14, 2008

Francis Scott Key The Star Spangled Banner



Francis Scott Key The Star Spangled Banner Clip Art: Francis Scott Key standing on boat, with right arm stretched out toward the United States flag flying over Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland.

Digital ID: cph 3g06200 Source: color film copy transparency. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-6200 (color film copy transparency) , LC-USZ62-1764 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve unedited JPEG version (174 kilobytes)

Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) lawyer, author, poet, from Georgetown, wrote the words to the national anthem of the United States' "The Star-Spangled Banner". September 14, 1814.

TITLE: The Star Spangled Banner, CALL NUMBER: BIOG FILE - Key, Francis Scott [P&P], REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZC4-6200 (color film copy transparency)
LC-USZ62-1764 (b&w film copy neg.).

Francis Scott Key The Star Spangled Banner clipart

MEDIUM: 1 photomechanical print : halftone, color. CREATED/PUBLISHED: c1913. NOTES: K62984 U.S. Copyright Office. Copyright by Percy E. Moran. (EXPIRED)

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (color film copy transparency) cph 3g06200 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g06200 (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a05514 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a05514. VIDEO FRAME ID: LCPP003A-05514 (from b&w film copy neg.) CONTROL #: 98513933

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp. the same is also true in many other countries. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case the artist died in 1935 , and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day, december 31st of that year.

Tags: Public Domain Clip Ar and clip art or public domain and Francis Scott Key or The Star-Spangled Banner

Saturday, September 13, 2008

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus)

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus)

Image Number K5751-1, Sunflowers in Fargo North Dakota. Photo by Bruce Fritz.

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus)

Image Number K5752-2, Sunflowers. Photo by Bruce Fritz. U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Digital Rights and Copyright: Most information presented on the USDA Web site (THESE IMAGES) is considered public domain information.

Public domain information may be freely distributed or copied, but use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. Attribution may be cited as follows: "U. S. Department of Agriculture."
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant in the family Asteraceae and native to the Americas, with a large flowering head (inflorescence). The stem can grow as high as 3 metres, and the flower head can reach 30 cm in diameter with the "large" seeds. The term "sunflower" is also used to refer to all plants of the genus Helianthus, many of which are perennial plants. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Sunflower SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

Friday, September 12, 2008

Tug Boat Jennifer Turecamo

Tug Boat Jennifer Turecamo

Tug Boat Jennifer Turecamo
The Moran owned Twin Screw 4300 hp Tug Boat Jennifer Turecamo, Tug 44 moving up the Hudson River. the New Jersey Palisades in th background.

2006 Crew: Nemodeer Carolina Salguero, Elves: Gary Baum, Amy Sisti, Patti Kelly, Jamie Keenan, Erica Reynolds, Captain John Barret, Mate George Uihlein
Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Thursday, September 11, 2008

World Trade Center 911 Tribute in Light

World Trade Center 911 Tribute in LightThe "Tribute in Light" memorial is in remembrance of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, in honor of the citizens who lost their lives in the World Trade Center attacks. The two towers of light are composed of two banks of high wattage spotlights that point straight up from a lot next to Ground Zero. This photo was taken from Liberty State Park, N.J., Sept. 11, the five-year anniversary of 9/11. (U.S. Air Force photo/Denise Gould)
Image Licence: Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

RELATED IMAGES: 9/11 A Navy Photographer's View of a Tragedy

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Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Tupolev Tu 160 Blackjack Bomber

Tupolev Tu 160 Blackjack BomberThe Russian Tupolev Tu-160 NATO name Blackjack is a long range strategic bomber that became operational in the late 1980s. It is capable of carrying cruise missiles, short range missiles, bombs or a combination of each.
The Blackjack has variable geometry wings and a maximum level speed of Mach 2.05. It remains in service with the Russian Air Force. by Richard J. Terry, undated.

Image License: DIA artists completed this series of paintings during the Cold War when the Soviet Union posed the major threat to the security of the United States. The artists worked as visual information specialists in the Illustrations Department of DIA, located in the "B" Building of Arlington Hall Station, Virginia. Defense Intelligence Agency

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government produced by an employee of the United States government in the performance of his or her duties. under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

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Tuesday, September 09, 2008

Ford Fiesta, 65 mpg Ford, Fiesta Econetic

Ford Fiesta, 65 mpg Ford, Fiesta EconeticFord's Fiesta ECOnetic gets 65 mpg, 51 mpg city 74 mpg freeway. The subcompact seats five and come with navigation system.
Full resolution‎ (2,217 × 1,354 pixels, file size: 771 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg). Ford's 2009 Fiesta ECOnetic goes on sale in November 2008 only in Europe. The Fiesta ECOonetic runs on a 1.6 liter, four cylinder, 89 hp, turbo diesel engine.

At present currency rates, the Fiesta ECOnetic might sell for $25,700 in the U.S. A $1,300 tax deduction for consumers buying diesel cars would bring the price down to around $24,400.

Ford America President Mark Fields says "But there are business reasons why we can't sell it in the U.S."

Image: Description: Ford Fiesta mk7 at Moscow International Autoshow, 26 august 2008. Date: 26 august 2008. Author: Basilex

Image Licensing: Public domain I (Basilex), the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I (Basilex) grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

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Monday, September 08, 2008

Asian Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix

Asian Silver CarpAsian Silver Carp - An Arkansas fish farmer brought silver carp, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix,
to the U.S. from Asia in 1973 to control phytoplankton and apparently as a food fish.

Silver carp have also been used in sewage lagoons. The silver carp escaped in the early 1980's into the Mississippi River Basin. This fish is a very proficient feeder that uses gill rakers that are fused into sponge-like porous plates. Silver carp can consume two or three times their weight in plankton each day. Because of its preferred food items, the silver carp is in direct competition with all native fish larvae and juveniles, adult paddlefish, bigmouth buffalo, gizzard shad, and native mussels.

These fish can grow to be over three feet long and about 60 lbs. Boaters, jet skiers and fishery biologists have all been hit by silver carp in the lower Upper Mississippi River. There's documentation of people sustaining concussions, broken vertebrae, legs and arms from these "flying" fish. The true reason why silver carp jump has not been proven yet, but it is believed that when boat motors are above a certain RPM, the noise, vibration and bubbles cause the silver carp to jump out of the water to escape. LaCrosse Fisheries U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

U.S. Department of the Interior Image and Text Disclaimer: Information presented on this website is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credit is requested. In this case, Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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Sunday, September 07, 2008

Dobermann Pinscher and Manchester Terrier

Dobermann Pinscher and Manchester TerrierThis active, speedy little dog has had much influence in the formation of many of the present-day breeds.
A generation ago the "rat terrier," as he was commonly and very appropriately called, was a well-known and popular dog, though now he is rarely seen. He is a product of the mining region of Manchester. England, and was quite a prominent figure in the holiday sports of that district.

His "long, flat, narrow, level, and wedge- shaped" head had little room left in it for good nature, after the native keenness and self-interest had been accommodated, and this breed has never been as popular with the outside world as with its owners on this account. Although they are very spirited and courageous, they are apt to be very short-tempered and snappy.

He is a beautifully set up little dog, clean of line as a greyhound, and only a degree or two less slender. He is entirely black, except for the deep mahogany tan that covers the chops and throat, chest, inner sides of legs, feet (except black toe-tops), ear linings, spots on eyebrows and the papilla on the cheek, and the under side of the tail at the root. His coat is close, hard, and very glossy, revealing his beautifully muscled, yet delicate frame. About 18 inches high, he should weigh 16 to 20 pounds, though a diminutive toy type exists, which is the tiniest of all dogs.

The Dobermann Pinscher

Perhaps the finest terrier with black-and-tan coloring is the Dobermann Pinscher, a sort of glorified Manchester terrier, which has been developed in Germany within the last 60 years.

He is about the height and weight of an Airedale, but perhaps by reason of his smooth coat and the fact that his tail is docked very short, he appears taller and slimmer than the British dog. He has a splendid carriage and an air of dignity and distinction. He is unusually intelligent, and to this fact may be attributed his
phenomenal success as a police dog. His delightful personality is rapidly bringing him into favor with Americans looking for a dog of good size that doesn't get in one's way.

This big German derivative of the black and tan, or Manchester terrier, might best be described as a large, strong bull terrier, with the strict black-and-tan coat, although one sometimes sees him in solid black, brown, or mole color "blue." White should never be present in a good Dobermann, nor other particolor than black or tan.

Like most of the dogs popular with the Germans, this is best handled with a firm and uncompromising domination. He is a willing and effective fighter, and, true to his terrier blood, is a relentless enemy to all ground vermin, such as marmots, hares, and badgers.

Decidedly a "one-man" dog, he does not readily make friends nor welcome advances of
a friendly nature. He is faithful and loyal to "the hand that feeds him," however, and is justly popular with those who own him. He is certainly one of the handsomest of the smooth dogs, being glossy of coat, trim, and straight, and strong of leg and body, and bright and keen of eye, lacking entirely the rather piggy look of the bull terrier with which he has been compared. He is rather larger than the bull terrier, however. He has never been extensively bred in this country.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

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Saturday, September 06, 2008

The Mastiff

MastiffIf the Pyrencan dog is one of the most beautiful dogs in the world, surely the English mastiff is one of the most famous. It is regarded as probably the oldest of all British dogs, and, as we have seen,
its ancestors were used by the Assyrians for hunting big game.

It is believed that this large, powerful dog was introduced into Britain in the sixth century B. C. by the adventurous Phoenician traders, and was used by the Britons in hunting and in warfare. The Romans found him well established when they invaded the island in 55 B. C., and thereafter mastiffs, because of their great size, strength, and courage, were used to fight in the Roman amphitheaters.

In more recent times the breed has become heavier and less active and has been used chiefly as a companion and a guardian of property.

Perhaps the most famous strain of mastiffs in England is at Lyme Hall, in Cheshire ; it is said to have come down in unbroken descent from the fifteenth century. When I [Mr. Baynes] was a small child my father's place, "Harcwood." was close to Lyme Park, and one of my earliest recollections is of going with my parents to an entertainment at Lyme Hall. Coming away we descended into a flagged court-yard, and I remember that we were at once surrounded by a number of huge, tawny dogs which I was told were the Lyme mastiffs.

Many stories are told of the services rendered by these splendid dogs to their masters, the Lees of Lyme. It is said that when Sir Peers Lee lay wounded on the battlefield of Agincourt, he was guarded by a mastiff which had followed him to the war and which lay beside him through the night. Sir Henry Lee, of the same family, was saved from death by one of the dogs, which pinned to the floor a valet who had come to his master's bedroom to murder him.

The perfect mastiff may be cither fawn with a dark face, ears and muzzle, or brindle. He stands about 28 inches, and should weigh about 170 pounds. There should he no dew-claw, and the small, dark eye should show no haw. Strong, straight and heavy, both of body and limb, with a deep chest and massive square head, the perfect mastiff is an exceedingly splendid-looking animal.

He is now bred mostly as a companion, and never sees service in his old romantic calling. He is probably part ancestor of the great Dane, whose principal other component is greyhound. One of the noblest of dogs, it is to be regretted that his unwieldiness and expensive keep have rendered him rather unpopular, so that now he is indeed rarely seen.

Points to avoid are a light, narrow, or undershot head, cow-hocks, sagging back and rolling gait, weak legs and bent pasterns, curly tail and pale face.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Friday, September 05, 2008

Pyrenean Sheep Dog (Pyrenean Mountain Dog)

Pyrenean Sheep Dog (Pyrenean Mountain Dog) One of the most beautiful dogs in the world is the Pyrenean sheep-dog, but, alas! the breed is almost extinct. Technically speaking, this animated snowdrift is not a sheep-dog at all, but closely related to the mastiffs.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

In form of body and texture of coat he greatly resembles the Tibet mastiff, though the latter is not so tall on the legs and is quite different in color, being velvety black, with rich tan markings.

Had the Pyrenean dog been a herder of sheep like the collie, no doubt his tribe would have been as numerous as ever; but the Spanish, and later the French, shepherds used him chiefly to guard their flocks against the ravages of the wolves and bears.

When wolves and bears became scarce in the Pyrenean Mountains, the need of this valiant defender grew less and the breed was neglected, until now but a few specimens remain.

Pyrenean Sheep Dog

The Pyrenean sheep-dog is one of the finest dogs that has been used in the manufacture of the present-day St. Bernard. It is quite possible that the old hospice-dog (which died out when roads and railways cut hither and thither through the Alps) was more of this type than is generally supposed.

The Pyrenean dog is one of the large dogs, but by no means so immense as the St. Bernard. A good male dog would probably weigh about loo to 1 10 pounds, as against 250 pounds for the St. Bernard.

He is usually pure white or cream-colored and bears a coat much like that of a Newfoundland, only with more underfur and of a more woolly texture.

He has seldom been brought to this country or even to England. He is preeminently a guardian dog, used to insure safety to the flock from the attack of wolves, smaller and nimbler dogs being used for the purpose of driving and herding.

The type is easier to conceive from the picture than by a written description. Like all dogs bred for utility, and not yet taken up by "the fancy," he is bound by no standard of perfection and is subject to considerable variation. The best dog is the one that does his work best, which is as it should be.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This image is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Pyrenean Sheep Dog (Pyrenean Mountain Dog)

This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Cerie at the Finnish Wikipedia project. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: Cerie grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

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Thursday, September 04, 2008

Collie, Smooth Collie, English Sheep Dog

Collie, Smooth Collie, English Sheep DogThere is little resemblance between the working "collie" of the Scottish sheep-herder and the elaborately furred, slender faced, bench- dog now so popular. The broad-skulled, rather neglected looking "shepherd dog'' of our boyhood, with his friendly, democratic manners (or lack of them)
would get short shrift now at any show or gathering of the elite, while of all dogs his handsome, richly frilled descendant, with all the car-marks of aristocracy, is the cause of more "Ohs" and "Ahs" than any other dog in the show.

Nevertheless, one might see an "ornery-looking," half-moulted type of the countryside handle a drove of 3,000 or more sheep in Saskatchewan in a manner to bring one up standing. And when, on returning at nightfall, he puts every ewe and lamb in one corral and every ram in another, without error or violence, one feels like asking him if he would shake hands with a mere spectator! It is doubtful if any borzoi-headed champion could do that with a lifetime of training.

Still, the collie is a most intelligent and handsome dog, and the present tendency is toward a greatly elongated and consequently narrowed head, forming almost a straight or even slightly deflected line from nose to occiput. The neck, throat, and chest bear a great frill of long hair, and the back of the thighs also is very deeply and richly furred. The hair of the body is long and straight, rather harsh, but with a deep and woolly undercoat. The feet, from hock and wrist down, should be smooth.

In color, the collie may be black and tan, "sable," or rich orange brown, with white frill, collar, and face "harlequin" ; or white, with black spotting and freckling at random ; "blue," or mouse color, and white, or even pure white everywhere. Some few kennels specialize in white collies and advertise extensively; they are very beautiful dogs, though probably requiring more care to keep presentable than the more "practical" colors, as our mothers would call them.

The collie should stand 20 to 24 inches and weigh from 40 to 60 pounds. He requires considerable exercise, and while growing up needs watching to prevent his acquiring a taste for chickens and even lamb. Once this predilection gets established, it is hard if not impossible to eradicate.

In this country we know the collie chiefly as a beautiful, vivacious, and alert companion, but in the great sheep-raising districts of Scotland, northern England, and Wales, he is an absolutely indispensable assistant of the shepherd.

Not that the working collie looks very much like the long-muzzled, much-beruffled, and well-groomed specimens which grace the benches at our dog shows. He would never be allowed inside the ring at Madison Square Garden, and if he were he would stand about as much chance of taking a prize as a blue-ribbon winner would have of defeating him in one of the great annual sheep-dog trials of his native land. He lacks the superficial beauty necessary to win in the show-ring but he has the brains, the courage, and the stamina without which the sheep industry of Great Britain would quickly come to a standstill.

In the land of misty mountains one good dog can do the work of a dozen men, and
there is no other animal which could possibly replace him.

Obeying the voice, or, better still, the whistle, of his master, a good working collie will "run out" to a distant pasture, round up his flock, separating them if necessary from other sheep, and bring them along at just the right speed; head off any which may try to take a wrong direction ; go back and hurry those which lag
behind ; fight off strange dogs if necessary, and finally bring them into the fold without losing
one.

Next morning he will take them away to the pasture and guard them all day, if asked to do so, or help his master to drive them to the market, along the quiet country lanes and the crowded city streets alike, preventing every attempt of his charges to wander or stampede.

The Shetland collie, a tiny sheep - herder weighing between six and ten pounds and imported from the Shetland Islands, is becoming known in the country as an attractive pet.


SMOOTH COLLIE - The smooth collie is to be judged by exactly the same standards in everything, except coat, as the rough, or common, collie.

The artist had never seen one and was somewhat desperate for a model, when to his surprise he found that the Belgian farmer who comes for the neighborhood garbage was accompanied by a fine specimen, brought with him in 1914 from home, whence he fled at the instance of the Hun!

It is somewhat of a surprise to see what a collie looks like in short hair, but it rather increases our regard for him than otherwise. For he is a fine, strong, "doggy" animal, and in this example, at least, the "refinement" which so often results in extremely nervous and high-strung dogs has not been sought.

The present fad for long, slender, roman- nosed and narrow-faced collies seems to introduce an entirely undesirable slenderness of temper as well, quite different from the genial, easy-going dependability of the "old-fashioned" collie, wide between the eyes and ears. It is a distinct loss to the breed.

ENGLISH SHEEP-DOG - Rapidly gaining in popularity, the curious woolly sheep-dog has become thoroughly established in the United States; he has long been used as a practical helper in the great sheep ranges of western Canada. He bears no resemblance whatever to the familiar collie type of sheep-dog, but looks rather like a great long-legged, round-headed, bounding terrier.

He has a formidable voice, very different indeed from the rather fox-like yap of the collie, and while he is some 24 to 27 inches at the shoulder and weighs 60 to 80 pounds one cannot quite get away from the impression that he is, in fact, a huge terrier of some kind. The effect is heightened greatly by the long woolly hair on his head and face, which virtually hides the clever eyes, and makes a study of his actual head-form very difficult. The hair on back and hips is very long; when combed out they look very curious indeed.

In color they are usually blue gray and white; any strong tendency toward brown is not good. The white usually occupies most of the head and fore-quarters.

He is a dog of very striking appearance — one might almost say of un-dog-like appearance. He is large, rather tall on the legs, tailless, and covered from head to foot with a long, loose hair, which tosses about freely when he runs or jumps, giving him the appearance of a huge animated floor-mop. But if you part the hair on his face you will find a pair of beautiful, intelligent, friendly eyes. He is active, good- natured, and makes a fine companion.

Dogs of this breed were not always bob- tailed ; originally they were probably as well provided with tails as other dogs. Many of them were used for herding, and consequently exempt from taxation. It is said that the drovers amputated the tails of their working sheep-dogs to distinguish them from those which were not exempted.

It is believed by some authorities that this mutilation, continued through many generations, created in the breed a tendency to produce tailless and short-tailed offspring. Whatever the cause, it is certain that today many Old English sheep-dog puppies are born bob- tailed. When they are born with tails it is customary to dock them to within an inch or two of the root, and the operation is performed not more than four days after birth.

The docking accentuates the characteristic rounded quarters and increases the somewhat bearlike appearance of the animal.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Wednesday, September 03, 2008

St. Bernard

St. BernardThe St. Bernard won both his name and his fame in the Swiss Alps, where for many years the monks of the Hospice St. Bernard have used dogs to assist them in saving the lives of travelers lost in the snow. One of these dogs, Barry, saved 40 people and was killed by the 41st, who mistook him for a wolf.
But the dogs used by the monks have changed greatly in appearance from time to time. Occasionaly an avalanche will destroy a large number, and those remaining will be bred to Newfoundlands, Pyrenean sheep dogs, and others having similar characteristics.

Some of the dogs kept at the hospice now resemble powerful foxhounds and would never
be admitted to an American bench show in competition with modern St. Bernards, either
smooth or rough coated.

The old-time working hospice dog had none of the grandeur of this more modern successor to his name, which has been compounded rather recently of several other dogs. Still he is about the most distinct of any of the large dogs, the Newfoundland being the only dog even remotely resembling him.

Like all very large heavy dogs, this breed is greatly given to weakness in the legs, cowhocks and weak hips being rather the rule than the exception. The "dewclaw," or extra hind toe, is also generally present (and was formerly considered desirable).

The perfect St. Bernard is a very large, very strong, straight-backed, strong-legged, and heavily organized dog, the colors, as shown, being those most eagerly sought. They may be either rough or smooth in coat. The best American dogs are those of Mr. Jacob Rupert, of Newark, N. J., and Miss C. B. Trask, of California. Indeed, it is doubtful if their dogs are to be surpassed anywhere.

The benign St. Bernard should show, in both types, broad, domed, massive head, loose skin, deep-set, rather mournful, eye, haw quite pronounced, and deep-folded flews and dewlap, though he should not be too "throaty." What is not mentioned in most brief accounts of this dog is the tremendously impressive voice in which he speaks. Probably no other dog has such a deep bass voice, nor such a volume of it. Yet it is as benign and kindly as his expression of countenance, and would tend rather to inspire hope and confidence than fear, even with the timid.

The deep personal affection with which St. Bernard owners invariably invest their companions is the best expression of the character of these great, dignified and rather somber dogs, which inspire no fear, even in little children, and which return the stranger's gaze with a look of calm, steady, and indulgent tolerance, and endure the advances of the unacquainted with a patience and dignity that speak worlds for their gracious and enduring disposition.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Tuesday, September 02, 2008

Chow or Chow Chow

Chow or Chow ChowThough there are two types of Chow in China, whence we got it, the smooth type has never been popular here nor in England, and may be ignored in this connection.
The rough or common Chow is a most attractive and distinctive dog of medium size, always "whole" colored red, black, brown, blue, or "smoke," cream or white. The red and "smoke" are the favorites among breeders and owners ; the darker and purer the color the better.

Perhaps no dog has more individuality, nor knows his own mind better than the Chow. He is frisky, playful, intelligent, and willing to obey his master implicitly; the rest of earth's population has no interest for him whatever. Those the artist has known were entirely tolerant of his presence, and even his caresses, in their own home or when their master was with them elsewhere. Off the porch or on the street they will not so much as notice a stranger, except that it is impossible to put a hand on them or elicit a glimmer of recognition. Of all dogs they are the most consistently a "one-man" type.

The Chow has several real peculiarities, among which the most pronounced is the purplish black interior of the mouth, including the tongue. He is a very cobby dog, standing on four exceedingly straight legs. He is straightcr in the stifle than any other dog. The muzzle should be short, the head square and massive, with a sort of scowl or frown that is helped by the widely set eyes.

The fur is very dense and deep, with a separate underfur like that of the Eskimo or other Arctic dogs, from which the Chow is supposedly derived. It also has the wide chops, small eye, and curly tail of his congeners.

The feet are small and catlike and the pointed ears are held upright. The neck all round has very deep fur, forming a sort of mane or ruff. All in all, he is about the most distinct type of dog to be seen. He has plenty of courage, though he is generally prudent and keeps out of trouble. With those he knows he is extremely
patient, being in this respect a fine dog to be among children.

The Chow is a common dog in China, but in this country he is regarded as an aristocrat, which is not unreasonable considering his proud bearing and ancient lineage.

Whether black, red, yellow, blue, or white, he is a dog of striking appearance and reminds one of an animated Chinese carving.

From The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind's Best Friend By National Geographic Society (U.S.), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Ernest Harold Baynes Published 1919. 109 pages Original from Harvard University.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in thi case Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874 – 1927) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

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Monday, September 01, 2008

Labor Day parade, New York, City

Labor Day parade, New York, New YorkLabor Day parade, New York, City. Digital ID: ppmsc 00154 Source: digital file from original. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-33530 (b&w film copy neg.)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (13 megabytes)

TITLE: [Labor Day parade, New York, New York] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-33530 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication.

SUMMARY: Woman on float of the Women's Auxilliary Typographical Union. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: [1909 September 6]

NOTES: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). digital file from Original negative may be available: LC-B2-874-13. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from original) ppmsc 00154 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.00154 (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a34038 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a34038 VIDEO FRAME ID: LCPP003A-34038 (from b&w film copy neg.) CONTROL #: 97519074

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-33530]

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