Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Friendship love and truth

Friendship love and truthTitle: Friendship love and truth Creator: Currier & Ives. Date Created/Published: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1874. Medium: 1 print : lithograph, hand-colored. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2373 (color film copy slide) Call Number: PGA - Currier & Ives--Friendship love and truth (A size) [P&P]
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (4 mb) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

In 1857, Nathaniel Currier and James Ives became publishing partners in what was to become one of America's most historically significant chroniclers of American history from the 1850's to the 1880's. Currier & Ives recorded a wide range of subjects, events, and common happenings of American life. The firm employed many well known artists, but only a few of them are credited as the creator of their own images. The hand colored prints have become highly collectible and are found in many museums. The business closed in 1907 as new printing technologies and changing tastes emerged.

Medium : 1 print : lithograph, hand-colored. Created/Published : New York : Currier & Ives, 1874. Creator : Currier & Ives

Part of the Currier & Ives collection housed in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case c1874) are now in the public domain..

When Friendship, Love and Truth abound Among a band of Brothers,

the cup of joy goes gaily round, each shares the bliss of others.

TEXT CREDIT: James Montgomery (1771-1854)

This text (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1813) are now in the public domain.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Faith Hope Charity Currier & Ives

Faith Hope Charity Currier & IvesTitle: Faith Hope Charity. Creator: Currier & Ives. Date Created/Published: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1874. Medium: 1 print : lithograph. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2296 (color film copy slide) Call Number: PGA - Currier & Ives--Faith Hope Charity (A size) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (4 mb) Digital ID: (color film copy slide) cph 3b50170, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2296 (color film copy slide) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case c1874) are now in the public domain..

Monday, March 29, 2010

Queen Victoria of England

Queen Victoria of EnglandQueen Victoria of England, by Alexander Melville, 1845, Friedenstein Castle Museum. Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha (Thüringen).

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death. Her reign lasted 63 years and 7 months, longer than any other British monarch, and her reign is the longest of any female monarch in history.
This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1845) are now in the public domain.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

The Descent from the Cross Peter Paul Rubens

The Descent from the Cross Peter Paul RubensThe Descent from the Cross Peter Paul Rubens, Antwerp Cathedral; wood, H. 13 ft x 9 ft. 6 in. Nine figures.

The body of the Saviour is being lowered from the cross on a sheet by two men mounted on ladders; they are aided by Nicodemus on one side, and Joseph of Arimatheea on the other, also on the ladders; below, St John receiving the body in his arms; beside him are Mary Magdalen and Salome, kneeling, and extending their hands to assist him ; beyond, the Virgin, standing. It is evening, and the multitude has departed
The Jews therefore, because it was the Preparation, that the bodies should not remain on the cross upon the sabbath (for the day of that sabbath was a high day) asked of Pilate that their legs might be broken; and that they might be taken away. The soldiers therefore came, and brake the legs of the first, and of the other which was crucified with him: but when they came to Jesus, and saw that he was dead already, they brake not his legs: howbeit one of the soldiers with a spear pierced his side, and straightway there came out blood and water.

And he that hath seen hath borne witness, and his witness is true: and he knoweth that he saith true, that ye also may believe. For these things came to pass, that the scripture might be fulfilled, A bone of him shall not be broken. And again another scripture saith, They shall look on him whom they pierced.

And after these things Joseph of Arimatha:a being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, asked of Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus: and Pilate gave him leave. He came therefore, and took away his body. And there came also Nicodemus, he who at the first came to him by night, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pound weight. So they took the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury. Now in the place.

where he was crucified, there was a garden; and in the garden a new tomb wherein was never man yet laid. There then because of the Jews' Preparation (for the tomb was nigh at hand) they laid Jesus.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1610-1611) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT CREDIT: Cyclopedia of painters and paintings, Volume 1 and The book of Easter

Saturday, March 27, 2010

The Elevation of the Cross Peter Paul Rubens

The Elevation of the Cross Peter Paul RubensIn 1610 when, according to tradition, Rubens had completed the St. Ildefonso altar-piece, he executed another work for the Walpurgis-church at Antwerp. This is the celebrated Elevation of the Cross, now in the transept of the cathedral at Antwerp. There is in the Louvre a drawing for this picture, giving an idea of the whole composition which, when finally executed, was divided into three parts. The Elevation of the Cross in the centre: on the right the Weeping Women: on the left the Roman Centurion. The central-subject has been reproduced in numberless ancient and modern prints).

A thick darkness covers the sky whilst the Saviour, extended upon the Cross, turns his suffering face towards the last rays of the setting sun.
The whole attention of the spectator is attracted by this figure alone for all the other figures are unimportant. Their whole attention appears to be directed to raising the heavy cross, and preventing it from slipping from its intended position. On one of the wings may be seen the Centurion, surrounded by other men on horseback, giving his orders with all the pride of a Roman official behind him are the two malefactors.

On the other wing is a striking group of the Mourning Women, amid whom St. John supports the Holy Mother overwhelmed with grief. Originally there was a lunette above the central-portion of this Ancona, representing God the Father, toward whom the Crucified One was directing his gaze: and also a predella consisting of three small pictures. These pieces were sold separately in the l8'h century by order of the church-authorities.

TEXT CREDIT: Title: Rubens Translated by: Luise Marie Schwaab Richter. Publisher: Velhagen & Klasing, 1904. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Mar 3, 2009 Length: 168 page

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1610-1611) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Friday, March 26, 2010

The Last Supper Leonardo da Vinci

The Last Supper Leonardo da VinciThe Last Supper (1495-1498) Convent of Sta. Maria delle Grazie, Milan, Italy (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). The Synoptic Gospels state that Christ's Last Supper was a Passover seder.
Passover begins on the 15th day of the month of Nisan (equivalent to March and April in Gregorian calendar), the first month of the Hebrew calendar's festival year according to the Hebrew Bible.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1495-1498) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

The Three Bears and Golden Hair

The Three Bears and Golden HairTitle: The oak-tree fairy book: favorite fairy tales. Editor: Clifton Johnson. Publisher: Little, Brown, and Company, 1905. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Oct 16, 2007. Length: 365 pages. Illustrated by George Willard Bonte Birth Date: 1873-05-16 Death Date: 1946-03-13.

Now the house that Golden Hair was in belonged to three bears — a big bear, a middle-sized bear, and a little bear. Shortly before Golden Hair rapped at their door they had cooked their porridge for dinner and set it on the table.
Then they had gone out for a little walk to give the porridge time to cool. While Golden Hair was asleep the bears came home. As soon as they entered the kitchen and looked at the table they saw that things were not as they had left them.

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TASTING MY PORRIDGE!" growled the big bear in his great, gruff voice.

"and Somebody Has Been Tasting My Porridge!" said the middle-sized bear.

" And somebody has been tasting my porridge and eaten it all up!" piped the little bear.

"We will look around," said they, "and see if there has been any more meddling."

Then they went into the parlor.

"Somebody has been sitting in my chair!" growled the big bear in his great, gtuff voice.

"And somebody has been sitting in my chair!" said the middle sized bear.

"and somebody has been sitting in my chair and broken it all to pieces," piped the little bear.

Then they went upstairs to the chamber.

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TUMBLING MY BED!" growled the big bear in his great, gruff voice.

"and Somebody Has Been Tumbling My Bed!" said the middle-sized bear.

"And somebody has been tumbling my bed, and here she is!" piped the little bear.

Golden Hair waked up just then, and before the three bears could catch her she slipped from the bed and scrambled down the stairs and out at the door. Then she ran home as fast as her legs could carry her, and she never went near the three bears' house again.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1905) are now in the public domain.

This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States, this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law..

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Randy's Donut Shop



The (1954) sign, as much as the baked goods, is the lure at Randy's Donuts, in Inglewood, California. One roadside-attractions website notes that because of its proximity to an L.A. freeway, the sign gets frequent "smog and soot scrubs."|04/07/05|01409 (digital file from LC-HS503-532)

Randy's Donuts, colloquially known as "The Big O", is a donut shop in Los Angeles, California, United States, made famous by the 32.5-foot donut on its roof. The building opened in 1954. It is recognizable due to its many appearances in movies, music videos, and television.

Carol M. Highsmith's photographs are in the public domain. Publication and other forms of distribution: Permitted. Ms. Highsmith has stipulated that her photographs are in the public domain.

Randy's Donut Shop

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, photograph by Carol M. Highsmith [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USZ62-123456] Creator: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Historic American Buildings Survey. Survey number HABS LC-HS503-532. Source: U.S. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, "Built in America" Collection.

Copyright: "The records in HABS/HAER were created for the U.S. Government and are considered to be in the public domain."

National Doughnut Day is on the first Friday of June each year, succeeding the Doughnut Day event created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor the women who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon

The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moonHi, diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed To see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon.

A collection of classics in children's literature, prose and verse, selected to stimulate children's interest and reading ability.

Title: Everyday classics first reader, Authors: Fannie Wyche Dunn, Franklin Thomas Baker, Ashley Horace Thorndike. ILLUSTRATED BY: MAUD AND MISKA PETEESHAM. Publisher: Macmillan, 1922. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Oct 12, 2007. Length: 144 pages.

Maud (1890–1971) and Miska (1888–1960) Petersham were an illustrating husband-and-wife team.
This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1911) are now in the public domain.

This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States, this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law..

Monday, March 22, 2010

The Three Bears

The Three BearsThree Bears, of mild and mannerly appearance, Meandering toward them Tim and Tilly saw, "I beg you will pardon seeming interference," The biggest Bear said, offering his paw.

"Oh, that's all right," said Tim, " we 're glad you met us, You see, we're idly wandering round the Zoo."

"Yes," said the Bear, "and, fearing you 'd forget us, We purposely sought out this interview. For I 'm sure you are aware That a self-respecting bear
Desires good conversation when it may be, I'm not unknown to fame, Big Bruin is my name, Allow me to present my wife and baby."
His wife was middle-sized and grizzled slightly, Her woolly hair was sort of yellow-buff, She bowed respectfully and most politely, And murmured softly, "I am Mammy Muff."

The little bear was very fat and cunning. "Here," said his father, "make your manners, Bub!"

The baby bear with grinning face came running, Bowed awkwardly, and said, "I'm Tiny Cub."

"You're a darling," Tilly said, Patting Tiny's woolly head, "And I 'm very glad with bears to get acquainted, For I've always thought them bold, Fierce and dreadful to behold,— But you're really not as black as you've been painted."


A smile crept o'er Big Bruin's woolly features. "Have ypu had that impression, Tim?" he said, "Though I can't answer for my fellow creatures, My family's exceedingly well-bred; And we have come to hear your conversation.

In order that we may improve our mind. We'll gladly listen now to your oration, If it is in your hearts to be so kind."

But Tilly then cried out, "'Tis the other way about! And what we want is just to hear your story, And if you 're willing now, We beg you 'll tell us how You reached your present state of fame and glory."

Title: Mother Goose's menagerie, Authors: Carolyn Wells, Peter Newell. Illustrated by: Peter Newell. Publisher: Noyes, Platt, 1901. Original from: Harvard University
Digitized: Dec 18, 2008. Length: 111 pages.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1901 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Three Goats Billy, Billy Goats Gruff

The Three Goats Billy, Billy Goats GruffA collection of classics in children's literature, prose and verse, selected to stimulate children's interest and reading ability.

Title: Everyday classics first reader, Authors: Fannie Wyche Dunn, Franklin Thomas Baker, Ashley Horace Thorndike. ILLUSTRATED BY: MAUD AND MISKA PETEESHAM. Publisher: Macmillan, 1922. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Oct 12, 2007. Length: 144 pages.

Maud (1890–1971) and Miska (1888–1960) Petersham were an illustrating husband-and-wife team.
There were three goats. There was Little Billy. There was Big Billy. And there was Biggest Billy. They were going across the river. They were going to eat grass and grow fat. Little Billy went first. "Trip-trip, trip-trip," said the bridge. A giant under the bridge said, "WHO IS TRIPPING ON MY BRIDGE?"

"I am," said Little Billy.

"where Are You Going?"

"I am going to eat grass and grow fat," said Little Billy.

"I Will Eat You," said the Giant.

"0h no," said Little Billy. "Eat Big Billy. He will come soon." "then Be Off," said the Giant.

Big Billy came next. "Trip-trap, trip-trap," said the bridge.

"WHO IS TRIP-TRAPPING ON MY BRIDGE?" said the Giant.

"I am," said Big Billy.

"WlIERE AEE YOU GOING?"

"I am going to eat grass and grow fat."

"I WILL EAT YOU."

"0h no, eat Biggest Billy," said Big Billy. "He is coming next."

"Then Be Off," said the Giant.

Then Biggest Billy came." Trap-trap, trap-trap," said the bridge.

"WHO IS TRAP-TRAPPING ON MY BRIDGE?"

"I am!" said Biggest Billy.

"Where Are You Going ?"

"I am going to eat grass and grow fat! "

"I WILL EAT YOU."

"Come and eat me, then"

So the Giant ran out. Biggest Billy pushed him into the river. The three goats Billy went across the river. They ate grass and grew fat.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1911) are now in the public domain.

This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States, this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law..

Friday, March 19, 2010

Alice in Wonderland Mad Tea Party Clip Art

. Alice in Wonderland Mad Tea Party Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

Title: Alice in Wonderland, Author: Lewis Carroll, Illustrator: Gordon Robinson, Release Date: August 12, 2006 [EBook #19033] Language: English. Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

SAM'L GABRIEL SONS & COMPANY NEW YORK Copyright, 1916, by SAM'L GABRIEL SONS & COMPANY NEW YORK.

There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it; a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep.

The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it. "No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming.

Alice in Wonderland Mad Tea Party Clip Art

"There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this, but all he said was "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"

"I'm glad they've begun asking riddles—I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.

"Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.

"Exactly so," said Alice.

"Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

"I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least—at least I mean what I say—that's the same thing, you know."

"You might just as well say," added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in its sleep, "that 'I breathe when I sleep' is the same thing as 'I sleep when I breathe!'"

"It is the same thing with you," said the Hatter, and he poured a little hot tea upon its nose. The Dormouse shook its head impatiently and said, without opening its eyes, "Of course, of course; just what I was going to remark myself."

"Have you guessed the riddle yet?" the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.

"No, I give it up," Alice replied. "What's the answer?"

"I haven't the slightest idea," said the Hatter.

"Nor I," said the March Hare.

Alice gave a weary sigh. "I think you might do something better with the time," she said, "than wasting it in asking riddles that have no answers."

"Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.

"I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone, "so I can't take more."

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1911) are now in the public domain.

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Little Red Ridinghood's Wolf

Little Red Ridinghood's WolfTim and Tilly trotted, Blithe and gay, O'er the fields with daisies dotted,

But when they Spied a wolf, of strength undoubted, He and she Simultaneously shouted,

"Goodness me!" Then the Wolf, with a suspicion, Of a frown, Said, " I hold a high position Of renown.

But I have a sort of notion, That your evident emotion, Is a proof of your devotion, Pray, sit down."

Tim and Tilly, shaking slightly, Shivering some, To the Wolf replied, politely,

" We have come Your acquaintance to be making, If you please." (Still the children both were shaking, at their knees.)
Then the Wolf said, very gently, "Why, my dears, I 'm surprised that evidently, You have fears Of my amiable intention, Can it be you've apprehension ? Gracious ! At the very mention, I shed tears ! "

Sure enough the Wolf was weeping, Though one eye At the children slyly peeping

They could spy. Tilly, finding self-possession, • Said, « Dear Sir," — And the Wolf, with kind expression, Looked at her,—

" We were scared to see you stalking 'Neath these trees; But you have put us, by your talking, Quite at ease.

Now, Sir, won't you tell the story, Of your rise to fame and glory ? But don't make it very gory,

If you please."

Title: Mother Goose's menagerie, Authors: Carolyn Wells, Peter Newell. Illustrated by: Peter Newell. Publisher: Noyes, Platt, 1901. Original from: Harvard University
Digitized: Dec 18, 2008. Length: 111 pages.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1901 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Three Blind Mice



Three Blind Mice: SAID Tilly to Tim, as they sauntered on, "This Zoo is very nice."

"It is," said Tim, in his hearty way, "I'm glad we came. Oh, Tilly, I say ! Just look at those dear little mice ! "
"
Oh, oh ! " Tilly cried, And her eyes opened wide, As three meek-looking, sleek-looking mice

she espied, Who contentedly sat on a bench side by side. "Why, they are the Three Blind Mice!"

Then the Mice began to flutter and fuss. "Who is it," cried one, "who is talking to us ? "

Said Tim, " Have no fear, We 're just stopping here, To talk a few minutes with you and your brothers

Before we go on to visit the others. We 're Tilly and Tim, and we 're going the rounds

Three Blind Mice

Of Old Mother Goose's Menagerie grounds, And now, if we may, With you we will stay Until we have heard all you may have to say."

"We like you," the Mice said," your

voices are kind, But alas ! we can't see you because we are blind.

But if you care to hear About our career,

We 'll tell you. It's quite interesting, you 'll find."

Three Blind Mice

Image edited by sookietex

Title: Mother Goose's menagerie, Authors: Carolyn Wells, Peter Newell. Illustrated by: Peter Newell. Publisher: Noyes, Platt, 1901. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Dec 18, 2008. Length: 111 pages.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1901 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Alice in Wonderland Cheshire Cat's Floating Head Clip Art

. Alice in Wonderland Cheshire Cat's Floating Head Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

Alice began to feel very uneasy : to be sure, she had not as yet had any dispute with the Queen, but she knew that it might happen any minute," and then," thought she, "what would become of me ? They're dreadfully fond of beheading people here; the great wonder is, that there's any one left alive!"

She was looking about for some way of escape, and wondering whether she could get away without being seen, when she noticed a curious appearance in the air it puzzled her very much at first, but after watching it a minute or two she made it out to be a grin, and she said to herself" It's the Cheshire Cat now I shall have somebody to talk to."

"How are you getting on ?" said the Cat, as soon as there was mouth enough for it to speak with.

Alice waited till the eyes appeared, and then nodded. "It's no use speaking to it," she thought, "till its ears have come, or at least one of them." In another minute the whole head appeared, and then Alice put down her flamingo, and began an account of the game, feeling very glad she had some one to listen to her. The Cat seemed to think that there was enough of it now in sight, and no more of it appeared.

Alice in Wonderland Cheshire Cat's Floating Head Clip Art

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Cheshire Cat's Floating Head Clip Art

"I don't think they play at all fairly," Alice began, in rather a complaining tone, "and they all quarrel so dreadfully one can't hear oneself speak—and they don't seem to have any rules in particular; at least, if there are, nobody attends to them—and you've no idea how confusing it is all the things being alive for instance, there's the arch I've got to go through next walking about at the other end of the ground — and I should have croqueted the Queen's hedgehog just now, only it ran away when it saw mine coming!"

"How do you like the Queen ?" said the Cat in a low voice.

"Not at all," said Alice "she's so extremely—" Just then she noticed that the Queen was close behind her, listening: so she went on, "—likely to win, that it's hardly worth while finishing the game."

The Queen smiled and passed on.

"Who are you talking to ?" said the King, coming up to Alice, and looking at the Cat's head with great curiosity.

"It's a friend of mine—a Cheshire Cat," said Alice "allow me to introduce it."

"I don't like the look of it at all," said the King "however, it may kiss my hand if it likes."

"I'd rather not," the Cat remarked.

" Don't be impertinent," said the King," and don't look at me like that!" He got behind Alice as he spoke.

"A cat may look at a king," said Alice." I've read that in some book, but I don't remember where."

"Well, it must be removed," said the King very decidedly, and he called to the Queen, who was passing at the moment," My dear! I wish you would have this cat removed!"

The Queen had only one way of settling all difficulties, great or small. " Off with his head! " she said, without even looking round,

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Monday, March 15, 2010

Alice in Wonderland Cheshire Cat and Queen of Hearts Clip Art

. Alice in Wonderland Cheshire Cat and Queen of Hearts Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

When she got back to the Cheshire Cat, she was surprised to find quite a large crowd collected round it : there was a dispute going on between the executioner, the King, and the Queen, who were all talking at once, while all the rest were quite silent, and looked very uncomfortable.

The moment Alice appeared, she was appealed to by all three to settle the question, and they repeated their arguments to her, though, as they all spoke at once, she found it very hard to make out exactly what they said.

The executioner's argument was, that you couldn't cut off a head unless there was a body to cut it off from: that he had never had to do such a thing before, and ho wasn't going to begin at his time of life.

The King's argument was, that anything that had a head could be beheaded, and that you weren't to talk nonsense.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Cheshire Cat and Queen of Hearts Clip Art

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Cheshire Cat and Queen of Hearts Clip Art

The Queen's argument was, that if something wasn't done about it in less than no time she'd hive everybody executed, all round. (It was this last remark that had made the whole party look so grave and anxious.)

Alice could think of nothing else to say but "It belongs to the Duchess you'd better ask her about it."

"She's in prison." the Queen said to the executioner: "fetch her here." And the executioner went off like an arrow.

The Cat's head began fading away the moment he was gone, and, by the time he had come back with the Duchess, it had entirely disappeared; so the King and the executioner ran wildly up and dowm looking for it, while the rest of the party went back to the game.

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Alice's adventures in wonderland The Caterpillar Clip Art

. Alice's adventures in wonderland The Caterpillar Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

Alice's adventures in wonderland The Caterpillar

The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.

"Who are you?" said the Caterpillar.

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, " I—I hardly know, sir, just at present—at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then."

"What do you mean by that?" said the Caterpillar sternly. "Explain yourself!"

"I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir," said Alice, "because I'm not myself, you see."

"I don't see," said the Caterpillar.

Alice's adventures in wonderland The Caterpillar Clip Art

"I'm afraid I can't put it more clearly," Alice replied very politely, "for I can't understand it myself to begin with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very confusing."

" It isn't," said the Caterpillar.
" Well, perhaps you haven't found it so yet," said Alice; " but when you have to turn into a chrysalis—you will some day, you know—and then after that into a butterfly, I should think you'll feel it a little queer, won't you V

" Not a bit," said the Caterpillar.

" Well, perhaps your feelings may be different," said Alice; " all I know is, it would feel very queer to me."

" You !" said the Caterpillar contemptuously. " Who are you ? "
Which brought them back again to the beginning of the conversation. Alice felt a little irritated at the Caterpillar's making such very short remarks, and she drew herself up and said, very gravely, " I think you ought to tell me who you are, first."

"Why?" said the Caterpillar.

Here was another puzzling question ; and as Alice could not think of any good reason, and as the Caterpillar seemed to be in a very unpleasant state of mind, she turned away.

"Come back!" the Caterpillar called after her. "I've something important to say!"

This sounded promising, certainly : Alice turned and came back again.

" Keep your temper," said the Caterpillar.

" Is that all V said Alice, swallowing down her anger as well as she could.

"No," said the Caterpillar.

Alice thought she might as well wait, as she had nothing else to do, and perhaps after all it might tell her something worth hearing. For some minutes it puffed away without speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah out of its mouth again, and said, " So you think you're changed, do you?"

" I'm afraid I am, sir," said Alice; " I can't remember things as I used—and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together!"

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Alice in wonderland Dormouse in a Teapot Clip Art

. Alice in wonderland Dormouse in a Teapot Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

" Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.

" I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone, " so I can't take more."

" You mean you can't take less," said the Hatter: " it's very easy to take more than nothing."

" Nobody asked your opinion," said Alice.

"Who's making personal remarks now?" the Hatter asked triumphantly.

Alice did not quite know what to say to this: so she helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question. " Why did they live at the bottom of a well \"

Alice in wonderland Dormouse in a Teapot Clip Art

Alice's adventures in wonderland Dormouse in a Teapot clip Art

The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think about it, and then said, " It was a treacle-well."

" There's no such thing ! " Alice was beginning very angrily, but the Hatter and the March Hare went " Sh! sh!" and the Dormouse sulkily remarked, " If you can't be civil, you'd better finish the story for yourself."

" No, please go on ! " Alice said very humbly ; " I won't interrupt you again. I dare say there may be one."

" One, indeed!" said the Dormouse indignantly. However, he consented to go on. " And so these three little sisters—they were learning to draw, you know "

" What did they draw ?" said Alice, quite forgetting her promise.

" Treacle," said the Dormouse, without considering at all this time.

" I want a clean cup," interrupted the Hatter • "let's all move one place on."

He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse's place, and Alice rather unwillingly took the place of the March Hare. The Hatter was the only one who get any advantage from the change : and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his plate.

Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she began very cautiously: " But I don't understand. Where did they draw the treacle from ? "

" You can draw water out of a water-well," said the Hatter; so I should think you could draw treacle out of a treacle-well—eh, stupid?"

" But they were in the well," Alice said to the Dormouse, not choosing to notice this last remark.

" Of course they were," said the Dormouse,— "well in."

This answer so confused poor Alice, that she let the Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it.

"They were learning to draw," the Dormouse went on, yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy; "and they drew all manner of things—everything that begins with an M "

"Why with an M?" said Alice.

" Why not 1" said the March Hare.

Alice was silent.

The Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again

with a little shriek, and went on: " that

begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness—you know you say things are * much of a muchness'—did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness ?"

" Really, now you ask me," said Alice, very much confused, " I don't think "

" Then you shouldn't talk," said the Hatter.

This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Tuesday, March 09, 2010

Alice in Wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art

. Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

This Image Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art, is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

When suddenly a white rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh, dear! Oh, dear! I shall be too late!'' (When she thought it over afterward, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural), but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on,

Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art

Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art

Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art

Alice in wonderland White Rabbit Clip Art

Alice started to her feet; for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a Rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket or a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself, before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

Monday, March 08, 2010

Alice's adventures in wonderland Alice, Cheshire Cat

Cheshire CatAlice was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.

The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked good-natured, she thought: still it had very long claws and a great many teeth, so she felt that it ought to be treated with respect.
" Cheshire-Puss," she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name : however, it only grinned a little wider. "Come, it's pleased so far," thought Alice, and she went on. " Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here ? "

" That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.

" I don't much care where " said Alice.

" Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.

" so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation.

"Oh, you 're sure to do that," said the Cat, " if you only walk long enough."

Alice felt that this could not be denied, so she tried another question. " What sort of people live about here ? "

" In that direction," the Cat said, waving its right paw round, " lives a Hatter : and in that direction," waving the other paw, " lives a March Hare. Visit either you like, they 're both mad.'

" But I don't want to go among mad people," Alice remarked.

" Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat : "we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."

" How do you know I 'm mad ? " said Alice.

" You must be," said the Cat, " or you wouldn't have come here."

Alice didn't think that proved it at all: however, she went on: " And how do you know that you 're mad ?"

" To begin with," said the Cat, " a dog 's not mad. You grant that?"

" I suppose so," said Alice.

" Well, then," the Cat went on, " you see a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I 'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad."

" I call it purring, not growling," said Alice.

" Call it what you like' said the Cat. " Do you play croquet with the Queen today ? "

" I should like it very much," said Alice, " but I haven't been invited yet."

" You 'll see me there," said the Cat, and vanished.

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Sunday, March 07, 2010

Alice's adventures in wonderland Alice, March Hare, Dormouse and the Mad Hatter

Title Alice's adventures in wonderland. Author: Lewis Carroll. Publisher: Macmillan, 1898. First Published 1865. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 20, 2007. Length: 192 pages, with original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914)

There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. " Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse," thought Alice ; " only as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind."

The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it. " No room ! No room !" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. " There's plenty of room ! " said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

Alice's adventures in wonderland Alice, March Hare, Dormouse and the Mad Hatter

Alice's adventures in wonderland Alice, March Hare, Dormouse and the Mad Hatter

" Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. " I don't see any wine," she remarked.

"There isn't any," said the March Hare.

" Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily.

" It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited," said the March Hare.

" I didn't know it was your table," said Alice : " it's laid for a great many more than three."

" Your hair wants cutting," said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

" You should learn not to make personal remarks," Alice said with some severity : "it's very rude,."

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1865) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir John Tenniel (28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Saturday, March 06, 2010

Alice in Wonderland Characters

Alice in Wonderland Characters: Peter Newell's illustration of Alice surrounded by the characters of Wonderland. (1890).

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Its the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world.

Alice in Wonderland artist Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, American artist and author, born in McDonough County, Illinois. Newell often illustrated the works of other authors, such as Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, John Kendrick Bangs, and Lewis Carroll.

This Alice in Wonderland Clip Art Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

This Alice in Wonderland Clip Art file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Peter Sheaf Hersey Newell March 5, 1862 – January 15, 1924, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Alice in Wonderland Characters Clip Art

Alice in Wonderland Public Domain Clip Art

Thursday, March 04, 2010

General Kazimierz (Casimir) Pulaski

Title: Kazimierz Pulaski near Częstochowa, Painter: Józef Chełmoński (1849–1914) Year: 1875, Painting in collection: National museum, Warsaw, Poland. Characteristics: oil on canvas, 87 x 144 cm.
This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Józef Chełmoński 1849 –1914, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

General Kazimierz (Casimir) Pulaski, during the American Revolutionary War, he saved the life of George Washington and became a general in the Continental Army. He died of wounds suffered in the Battle of Savannah. Pułaski is one of only seven people to be awarded honorary citizenship to the US.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Dr. Seuss Ted Geisel

Dr. Seuss Ted GeiselTITLE: [Ted Geisel (Dr. Seuss) half-length portrait, seated at desk covered with his books] / World Telegram & Sun photo by Al Ravenna. CALL NUMBER: NYWTS - BIOG--Geisel, Ted--Author [P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-116956 (b&w film copy neg.)

RIGHTS INFORMATION: No copyright restriction known. Staff photographer reproduction rights transferred to Library of Congress through Instrument of Gift.
This photograph is a work for hire created prior to 1968 by a staff photographer at New York World-Telegram & Sun. It is part of a collection donated to the Library of Congress. Per the deed of gift, New York World-Telegram & Sun dedicated to the public all rights it held for the photographs in this collection upon its donation to the Library. Thus, there are no known restrictions on the usage of this photograph.

MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1957. NOTES: NYWT&S staff photo by Al Ravenna.

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress). DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c16956 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c16956. CONTROL #: 96519865

Tuesday, March 02, 2010

Sistine Chapel, fresco Michelangelo Hands of God and Adam

Image of the hand of God giving life to Adam from the Sistine Chapel ceiling, painted by Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564, between 1508 and 1512, at the commission of Pope Julius II.

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Michelangelo, February 18, 1564 and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

Sistine Chapel, fresco Michelangelo Hands of God and Adam

creation of adam

Gotham City Spring Sistine Chapel mash-up, fresco Michelangelo Hands of God and Adam edited image

i, (+sookie tex) the creator of this Gotham City Spring Clip Art image, hereby release them into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This Gotham City Spring Clip Art image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (+sookie tex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Monday, March 01, 2010

NASA's Space Shuttle Program Blasting Off Into History

NASA's Space Shuttle Program Blasting Off Into HistoryNASA's Space Shuttle Program conducted the final test firing of a reusable solid rocket motor Feb. 25 in Promontory, Utah. The flight support motor, or FSM-17, burned for approximately 123 seconds--the same time each reusable solid rocket motor burns during an actual space shuttle launch. Preliminary indications show all test objectives were met.
After final test data are analyzed, results for each objective will be published in a NASA report.

The test--the 52nd conducted for NASA by ATK Launch Systems, a unit of Alliant Techsystems Inc.--marks the closure of a test program that has spanned more than three decades. The first test was in July 1977. The ATK-built motors have successfully launched the space shuttle into orbit 129 times.

Image Credit: NASA.

NASA Copyright Notification: NASA still images; audio files; video; and computer files used in the rendition of 3-dimensional models, such as texture maps and polygon data in any format, are not protected by copyright unless noted. If not copyrighted, they may be reproduced and distributed without further permission from NASA.

NASA makes every attempt to use media on our web pages (e.g., graphics, artwork, sounds. video), that is free for use or in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services.

Credit is requested by NASA. Where a photographer is noted, please credit the photographer and his/her affiliated organization as well.