Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Santa Claus for President

Santa Claus for President: editing/sookietex More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2011/11/santa-claus-for-president.html

Our Claus had wisdom, for his good fortune but strengthened his resolve to befriend the little ones of his own race. He knew his plan was approved by the immortals, else they would not have favored him so greatly.

So he began at once to make acquaintance with mankind. He walked through the Valley to the plain beyond, and crossed the plain in many directions to reach the abodes of men. These stood singly or in groups of dwellings called villages, and in nearly all the houses, whether big or little, Claus found children.

The youngsters soon came to know his merry, laughing face and the kind glance of his bright eyes; and the parents, while they regarded the young man with some scorn for loving children more than their elders, were content that the girls and boys had found a playfellow who seemed willing to amuse them.

So the children romped and played games with Claus, and the boys rode upon his shoulders, and the girls nestled in his strong arms, and the babies clung fondly to his knees. Wherever the young man chanced, to be, the sound of childish laughter followed him; and to understand this better you must know that children were much neglected in those days and received little attention from their parents, so that it became to them a marvel that so goodly a man as Claus devoted his time to making them happy. And those who knew him were, you may be sure, very happy indeed.

The sad faces of the poor and abused grew bright for once; the cripple smiled despite his misfortune; the ailing ones hushed their moans and the grieved ones their cries when their merry friend came nigh to comfort them.

Santa Claus for President

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1907, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Lewis Jesse Bridgman (1857-1931) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

IMAGE CREDIT: The Santa Claus Club Author: Lewis Jesse Bridgman (1857-1931). Publisher: H.M. Caldwell Company, 1907. Original from: the New York Public Library, Digitized: May 16, 2007. Length: 80 pages. Subjects: Biography & Autobiography › Presidents & Heads of State, Biography & Autobiography / Presidents & Heads of State, Children's poetry, Nursery rhymes, Parades, Presidents, Santa Claus.

TEXT CREDIT: The life and adventures of Santa Claus Author: Lyman Frank Baum. Publisher: The Bowen-Merrill company, 1902. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Apr 22, 2005. Length: 206 pages, Subjects: Fiction › Fantasy › General, Christmas stories, Fairies, Fantasy, Fiction / Classics, Fiction / Fantasy / General, Religion / Holidays / Christmas & Advent, Santa Claus.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Autumn New York City Fall Colors Central Park

The view from the edge of the Terrace is exceedingly picturesque. On the Esplanade, which runs to the edge of the Lake, is the Bethesda Fountain, with its sparkling jets and silvery drip from the upper to the lower basin. Across the Lake is its bold northern shore, with grey rocks, whose ruggedness is softened by deep foliage; then comes the green of the Ramble, with the grey tower of the Belvedere in the background, the whole being half framed in by the soft green mounds that rise on either side of the Esplanade. In the main basin of the Bethesda Fountain are a number of rare water plants. These are all completely labeled and include the Lotus, the beautiful, flesh-colored India water lily, the Papyrus plant and the beautiful South American floating pond-weed.

The Bethesda Fountain is a representation of the story of the Pool of Bethesda, St. John (5, 2-4). Its crowning feature is the figure of an angel who appears to have just alighted on a mass of ro««k, and extends her hands as if blessing the waters which gush from it into the upper basin of the fountain, overflowing this and dripping into the lower basin, throwing a silvery veil over four figures symbolic of Temperance, Purity, Health and Peace. The fountain was designed and the figures were executed by Emma Stebbins.

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Autumn New York City Fall Colors Central Park

Autumn New York City Fall Colors Central Park

Autumn New York City Fall Colors Central Park

CC0 To the extent possible under law, sookietex has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to fall_colors_new_york_city.

TSXT CREDIT: New York and its environs Author: Gustav Kobbé. Publisher: Harper & brothers, 1891. Original from: the New York Public Library. Digitized: Dec 19, 2005. Length: 282 pages. Subjects, New York (N.Y.)

Monday, November 28, 2011

Jaw Harp (Jew's harp)

Jaw Harp: Small and easy-to-carry, the wrought iron jaw harp produced a jaunty accompaniment to campfire songs. This instrument was excavated from a campsite near Winchester, Virginia. Wrought iron. L 7.9, W 5.3, T 0.6 cm Gettysburg National Military Park, GETT 3095

Jew's harp, from a Civil War camp near Winchester, Virginia Gettysburg National Military Park, GETT 26368

Jew's Harp — Sonorous Substances. Europe. A small metallic tongue vibrating within an iron frame shaped like a horseshoe. When played it is placed between the teeth, and vibrations of the metallic tongue are produced by striking it with the finger while a tune is hummed. One theory of the name is that it was originally jaw's harp, from its position while being played, and another that it was first made and sold in England by Jews. It is shrill and peculiar in sound, and rather melancholy. Even in the Nineteenth Century the Jew's harp retained its popularity. In 1860 no less than six million are said to have been produced in Steyer, province of Styria, Austria.

Ownership: Information created or owned by the NPS and presented on this website, unless otherwise indicated, is considered in the public domain. It may be distributed or copied as permitted by applicable law.

This image is a work of a United States National Park Service employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Jaw Harp (Jew's harp)

Jaw Harp (Jew's harp)

TEXT CREDIT: The American history and encyclopedia of music The American History and Encyclopedia of Music, William Lines Hubbard. Authors: George Whitfield Andrews, Edward Dickinson, Arthur Foote, Janet M. Green, Emil Liebling, Josephine Thrall. Editor: William Lines Hubbard. Publisher: I. Squire, 1908. Original from: the New York Public Library. Digitized: Sep 17, 2008. Subjects: Music

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Santa Got Hops

Santa hits Vandenberg gym before big night - In preparation for a long Christmas night delivering presents and eating cookies, Santa Claus hits the gym. Mr. Claus will make his annual excursion around the world and visit the homes of those on the "nice" list. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kerelin Molina)

Members of the 601st Air and Space Operations Center at TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AFNS) will once again track Santa Claus on part of his journey around the world this Christmas Eve,

This Web site is provided as a public service by Vandenberg Air Force Base, 30th Space Wing Public Affairs.

Information presented on this Web site, the Official Website of Vandenberg Air Force Base, is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Santa Got Hops

Saturday, November 26, 2011

HMS Resolute

Her Majesty's visit to the Arctic Ship "Resolute" in Cowes Harbour. The Illustrated London News, December 27, 1956.

The HMS Resolute HMS was a mid-19th century barque-rigged ship of the British Royal Navy, specially outfitted for Arctic exploration.. Abandoned north of the Arctic Circle in 1854, the HMS Resolute was later found by the crew of an American whaling ship, refitted, and sent to Queen Victoria as a token of goodwill. When the ship was later dismantled, the "Resolute" desk was made from timbers of the ship, and Queen Victoria gave it to President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1880. Every President from President Hayes through President Dwight D. Eisenhower used the desk; it was first placed in the Oval Office in 1961 at the request of President John F. Kennedy.

After being on exhibit for ten years at the Smithsonian Institution, the Resolute was put back into use by President Jimmy Carter. The Resolute was also used in the Oval Office by President Ronald Reagan and for a few months by President George Bush. On January 20, 1993, the historic desk was returned to the Oval Office once again, at the request of President Clinton.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

HMS Resolute

HMS Resolute

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

By Illustrated London News [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Tony Romo of the Dallas Cowboys

080210-N-HP196-010. U.S. Navy Adm. Timothy J. Keating, left, commander, U.S. Pacific Command, poses with Tony Romo of the Dallas Cowboys before the 2008 National Football League Pro Bowl football game at Aloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii, Feb. 10, 2008. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Elisia V. Gonzales/Released)Photographer's Name: MC2 Elisia V. GonzalesLocation: Honolulu. Date Shot: 2/10/2008Date Posted: 2/17/2009VIRIN: 080210-N-HP196-01

DefenseImagery.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense-Public Affairs Defense Visual Information Directorate.

Information presented on DefenseImagery.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Tony Romo of the Dallas Cowboys

Tony Romo of the Dallas Cowboys

No. 9 Dallas Cowboys. Quarterback. Personal information: Date of birth: April 21, 1980. Place of birth: San Diego, California. Height: 6 ft 2 in. Weight: 226 lb.

Career information: College: Eastern Illinois, Undrafted in 2003, Debuted in 2004 for the Dallas Cowboys. Career history: Dallas Cowboys (2003–present) Roster status: Active. Career highlights and awards: 3× Pro Bowl selection (2006, 2007, 2009) CBS' All-Iron Award (2009) College awards and honors.

TEXT RESOURCE: Tony Romo From Wikipedia

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers watches as Soldiers demonstrate combatives. photo by Pfc. Howard Ketter/20th PAD.

A group of professional athletes visited Fairbanks and Fort Wainwright March 7 to 14 to attend the post’s National Prayer Luncheon. The athletes also held a football clinic, signed autographs at the Post Exchange and took part in combatives training with Soldiers.

U.S. ARMY Alaska (USARAK) Web Site is provided as a public service by the Office of the Public Affairs, HQ USARAK staff elements, USARAK subordinate commands, and separately authorized activities.

Information presented on U.S. ARMY - Alaska (USARAK) Web Site is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers. No. 12 Green Bay Packers, Quarterback. Personal information. Date of birth: December 2, 1983. Place of birth: Chico, California. Height: 6 ft 2 in Weight: 225 lb. Career information. College: California

NFL Draft: 2005 / Round: 1 / Pick: 24, Debuted in 2005 for the Green Bay Packers. Career history, Green Bay Packers (2005–present)

Career highlights and awards, Super Bowl Champion (XLV), Super Bowl MVP (XLV) FedEx Air NFL Player of the Year (2010) Pro Bowl Selection (2009) First-team All-Pac-10 (2004) Only player in NFL history to throw for over 4,000 yards in each of the first two seasons as a starting QB. Only player to have a passer rating over 110 in each game for the first 10 games of the season.

TEXT RESOURCE: Aaron Rodgers From Wikipedia

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

A butcher shop window at Thanksgiving time

Title: A butcher shop window at Thanksgiving time. Norwich, Connecticut. Creator(s): Delano, Jack, photographer. Date Created / Published: 1940 Nov. Medium: 1 negative : nitrate ; 35 mm. Reproduction Number: LC-USF33-020727-M2 (b&w film nitrate neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions. For information, see U.S. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black & White Photographs. Most photographs in this collection are considered to be in the public domain; however, labels on a few images indicate that they may be restricted. Privacy and publicity rights may also apply.

Publication and other forms of distribution: Permitted. Most photographs in this collection were taken by photographers working for the U.S. Government. Work by the U.S. Government is not eligible for copyright protection.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Call Number: LC-USF33- 020727-M2 [P&P] Other Number: D 6375 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA.

Notes: Title and other information from caption card. LOT 1277 (Location of corresponding print). Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944. More information about the FSA / OWI Collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsaowi.

A butcher shop window at Thanksgiving time

Un-edited Image: JPEG (32kb) || JPEG (158kb) || TIFF (12.7mb) ||

Subjects: United States--Connecticut--Norwich. Format: Nitrate negatives. Collections: Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Thanksgiving Turkeys after Raffle

Title: Thanksgiving - taking home turkies from raffle. Date Created/Published: 1912 Nov. 22. Medium: 1 photographic print. Summary: Rear view of 3 men, each carrying a turkey over his shoulder, on road. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-70874 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 10932 [item] [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Notes: Title and other information transcribed from unverified, old caption card data and item. George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Caption card tracings: Birds Turkies; Holidays Thanksgiving; Holidays; Shelf. Collections: Bain Collection.

The George Grantham Bain Collection represents the photographic files of one of America's earliest news picture agencies. The collection richly documents sports events, theater, celebrities, crime, strikes, disasters, political activities including the woman suffrage campaign, conventions and public celebrations. The photographs Bain produced and gathered for distribution through his news service were worldwide in their coverage, but there was a special emphasis on life in New York City. The bulk of the collection dates from the 1900s to the mid-1920s, but scattered images can be found as early as the 1860s and as late as the 1930s.

Thanksgiving Turkeys after Raffle

Un-edited Image: JPEG (37kb) || TIFF (1.7mb)

Monday, November 21, 2011

Thanksgiving Day Dance

Title: Thanksgiving Puck / L.M. Glackens. Creator(s): Glackens, L. M. (Louis M.), 1866-1933, artist. Date Created / Published: N.Y. : Published by Keppler & Schwarzmann, Puck Building, 1913 November 19. Medium: 1 photomechanical print : offset, color.

Summary: Illustration shows a large turkey, a jug of alcohol, and a pie with their feet locked in stocks and a long line of pilgrims dancing around them.

Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-27999 (digital file from original print)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case November 19, 1913, are now in the public domain.

Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1913 (Case X) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes: Title from item. Illus. in: Puck, v. 74, no. 1916 (1913 November 19), cover. Copyright 1913 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

Subjects: Thanksgiving Day--1910-1920. Turkeys--1910-1920. Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony)--1910-1920. Stocks (Punishment)--1910-1920. Pies--1910-1920. Alcoholic beverages--1910-1920.

Format: Cartoons (Commentary)--1910-1920. Magazine covers--1910-1920. Offset photomechanical prints--Color--1910-1920. Periodical illustrations--1910-1920. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand

Thanksgiving Day Dance

Un-edited Image: JPEG (63kb) || JPEG (171kb)

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Thanksgiving an Inspiration Peculiar to the Nation

Thanksgiving an Inspiration Peculiar to the Nation. The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905 November 22, 1903. Title: The Saint Paul globe. : (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905. Alternative Titles: Saint Paul daily globe May 11, 1896-May 13, 1896

St. Paul globe, Place of publication: St. Paul, Minn. Geographic coverage: Saint Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota | View more titles from this: City County, State. Publisher: [s.n.] Dates of publication: 1896-1905. Description: Vol. 19, no. 132 (May 11, 1896)-v. 28, no. 120 (Apr. 30, 1905). Frequency: Daily. Language: English. Subjects: Saint Paul (Minn.)--Newspapers.

Notes: Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection. Available on microfilm from the Minnesota Historical Society.

Title varies slightly. Weekly eds.: St. Paul weekly globe, May 11, 1896-Sept. 7, 1899, and: St. Paul semiweekly globe, Sept. 12, 1899- june 1900.

LCCN: sn 90059523. OCLC: 21579130. ISSN: 2151-5328. Preceding Titles: St. Paul daily globe. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896 Related Titles: St. Paul semi-weekly globe. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1899-1900 St. Paul weekly globe. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 18??-1899.



Un-edited Image: image_619x817_from_0,0_to_6771,8929.jpg (JPEG Image, 619x817 pixels 134.03 KB (137,242 bytes))

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case November 22, 1903, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

The first Thanksgiving 1621

Title: The first Thanksgiving 1621 / J.L.G. Ferris. Creator(s): Ferris, Jean Leon Gerome, 1863-1930, artist. Date Created / Published: Cleveland, Ohio : The Foundation Press, Inc., c1932. Medium: 1 photomechanical print : halftone, color.

Summary: Pilgrims and Natives gather to share meal. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-4961 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-15195 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. No renewal in Copyright office, 11/91.

Call Number: LOT 4579 [item] [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes: K17395 U.S. Copyright Office. Reproduction of oil painting from series: The Pageant of a Nation. No. 6. Copyright by The Foundation Press, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.

Subjects: Thanksgiving Day--1620-1630. Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony)--1620-1630. Indians of North America--Massachusetts--1620-1630. Eating & drinking--1620-1630.

Format: Halftone photomechanical prints--Color--1930-1940. Oil paintings--Reproductions--1930-1940. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

The first Thanksgiving 1621

Un-edited image files JPEG (70kb) || JPEG (151kb) || TIFF (38.3mb)

Friday, November 18, 2011

Regis Philbin Retires

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

CC0 To the extent possible under law, sookietex has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to Regis Philbin Retires and Regis Plaque.

King of morning talk Regis Philbin Retires. Regis Philbin and co-host Kelly Ripa greet fans and press at conclusion of final broadcast of Regis & Kelly at ABC/Walt Disney Company Studios on Upper West Side NYC Friday 11~18~11.

---------------------------------------------------

NEW YORK, Jan. 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Regis Philbin announced today that he will be retiring from the very successful, long-running talk show "LIVE! with Regis and Kelly." Philbin made the announcement live on-air this morning during the Host Chat portion of the show.

As Philbin stated to the viewers this morning, "This will be my last year on this show. It's been a long time, it's been 28 years since I've been here... There is a time that everything must come to an end..." Referring to his remaining time on the show he added, "We'll have a lot of fun between now and then."

Regis Philbin is a legend in the entertainment industry, a hall of fame broadcaster with more than 50 years in front of the camera. "LIVE! with Regis and Kelly" premiered in national syndication in 1988 as "Live with Regis & Kathie Lee." The show debuted locally in 1983 on WABC New York as "The Morning Show." A three-time Emmy Award winner, Philbin was also honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences at the Daytime Emmy Awards in 2008.

"It has been my great honor to work with Regis since the Walt Disney Company nationally syndicated 'LIVE' in 1988," said Janice Marinelli, president, Disney-ABC Domestic Television. "Regis is one of the great, iconic television personalities of our time and we couldn't have asked for a better friend and partner over the years. We will all certainly miss having Regis be a part of our day."

Regis Philbin Retires

The "LIVE" franchise will continue, and in the coming months Disney-ABC Television Group will name a new co-host to join the talented and captivating Kelly Ripa – who celebrates ten incredible years co-hosting with the show, next month.

While 2011 will be a year of great change for "LIVE," it will also be a time of incredible excitement as the show sends Philbin off in style. In the coming months, "LIVE" will welcome top guests and feature special segments, all part of the countdown to the spectacular farewell celebration for the incomparable Regis Philbin.

"WABC is proud to be the home of 'LIVE! with Regis and Kelly,' and it will be difficult to say goodbye to Regis after 28 years as a member of our family," commented Dave Davis, president and general manager, WABC. "We will miss him as a colleague and friend. We're fortunate, however, to have two real pros who can lead 'LIVE' into the future – Kelly Ripa, who has spent the last ten years developing her own amazing voice in daytime talk, and Michael Gelman, who has been with the show since its inception and is one of the best executive producers in daytime television."

"LIVE" began when Regis Philbin created "The Morning Show" for WABC in his native New York City; it soon became the number one show in the market. Kathie Lee Gifford joined him in June 1985 and in September 1988, the program debuted in national syndication and the title was changed to "Live with Regis & Kathie Lee." The show matched its local success with extraordinary national ratings and established itself as a dominant fixture in national television, a tradition that continued when Ripa joined the show in 2001.

For nearly 25 years, "LIVE" has been an essential stop for the top names in the entertainment industry. From award-winning actors to the hottest musical acts, the show boasts A-list celebrity guests, top-notch musical performances and one-of-a-kind segments that are unrivaled on daytime television.

Currently in its 23rd season in national syndication, "LIVE! with Regis and Kelly" is executive produced by Michael Gelman, and is distributed by Disney-ABC Domestic Television. Produced by WABC-TV in New York, "LIVE" airs in more than 200 markets across North America.

Regis Philbin Plaque

TEXT SOURCE: Disney-ABC Domestic Television via /PRNewswire/

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Peter Pan and Tinker Bell

"Tap, tap, tap." Somebody was knocking at the door.

"Who's there?" asked Peter sleepily.

"Tap, tap, tap."

He got up and opened the door. Tinker Bell, tinkling excitedly, flew into the room.

"The Pirates have captured them!" she tinkled, " the Pirates have captured them!" As Peter excitedly snatched up his dagger and sharpened it on the grindstone, he caught sight of Tinker Bell in his glass of medicine. He soon learned the reason when his little fairy told him in a weak voice that it was poisoned, and that she had drunk the poison as the only way to save his life. It was indeed an act of sell-sacrifice; for too well did Tink know how much Peter loved Wendy, and that no warning of hers would prevent him from keeping his promise.

Poor Tinker Bell was dying! She would most certainly have died if Peter, in a frenzy of grief and with tears in his eyes, had not made this passionate appeal to all children: "Do you believe in fairies? If you do, clap your hands and that will save poor Tinker Bell." There were no children there and it was night time, but he addressed all who might be dreaming of the Ncver-Land and who were therefore nearer to him than you think. "Do you believe?" he cried.

As his plea rang round the world, there came an echo of sound as of millions of little hands clapping, as if all the children throughout the world knew suddenly that of course they believed in fairies.

Peter Pan and Tinker Bell

The result was magical. Tinker Bell was saved; her light, which had been getting fainter and fainter, grew brighter and brighter again; the merry sound of tinkling (her way of speaking to Peter) which had almost died away, now grew stronger and stronger. She was once more the bright little fairy that escorted Peter to the Darling nursery, and again under her guidance, Peter set forth to rescue the Boys and Wendy.

He swore this terrible oath: "Hook or me this time!"

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1916, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Alice Bolingbroke Woodward, (1862–1951) , and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: Peter Pan: the boy who would never grow up to be a man Author: James Matthew Barrie. Editor: Frederick Orville Perkins. Publisher: Silver, Burdett & company, 1916. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Jul 17, 2008. Length: 79 pages. Subjects: Literary Criticism › Children's Literature, Children, Fairies, Literary Criticism / Children's Literature, Mermaids, Peter Pan (Fictitious character), Pirates, Social Science / Children's Studies.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Facel Vega HK-500

Facel was a French manufacturer of automobiles from 1954 to 1964. The company was named after the original metal stamping company FACEL, and the company's first model, the Vega, named after the star,[1] was introduced at the 1954 Paris Auto Show. The cars were advertised with the slogan For the Few Who Own the Finest.

The Vega production cars (Facel FV, later and more famously the HK500) appeared in 1954 using Chrysler V8 engines, at first a 4.5-litre (275 cu in) DeSoto Hemi engine; the overall engineering was straightforward, with a tubular chassis, double wishbone suspension at the front and a solid driven axle at the back, as in standard American practice. They were also as heavy as American cars, at about 1,800 kg (3,968 lb). Performance was brisk, with an approx 190 km/h (118 mph) top speed and 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in just under ten seconds.

Most cars were 2-door hardtops with no centre pillar, but a few convertibles were built.

Description: Photographed at the premises of the Louwman museum, The Hague, The Netherlands. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA. Date: September 25, 2011, 11:02:14. Author: AlfvanBeem.

This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Facel Vega HK-500

TEXT CREDIT: Facel

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Literary Walk Fall Colors Central Park New York City

Literary Walk Fall Colors Central Park New York City.

November 15.2011. Robert Burns and Sir Walter Scott visit, framed by the fall colors of American elm trees on the southern end of Literary or Poets' Walk. Known as the only straight line in Central Park and nicknamed the “Promenade," the mall runs from 66th to 72nd Streets.

When landscape architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed Central Park in 1858, their Greensward Plan included a grand formal area that they called the Mall or the Promenade. The Mall was a place for park visitors to parade in their Sunday best. The "Walk" is the Park’s widest pedestrian pathway.

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Literary Walk Fall Colors Central Park New York City

Monday, November 14, 2011

Halley's Comet

The great French astronomer Lalande considered Halley the greatest astronomer of his time. This opinion is still held. Halley's "time" means the age of Kepler, Sir Isaac Newton, Flamsteed, Hevelius, and Leibnitz, all of whom achieved first rank in Astronomy.

Halley's greatest achievement in Astronomy'was the i discovery that our solar system was but an atom in 'immeasurable space whence wandering stars could be caught within the influence of our Sun, our Earth and the other Planets swinging around our Sun.

Halley was the first to discover and to prove that the Comets that come within the vision of man have fixed periods of return. He made this discovery during the appearance of the great Comet of 1682, which has since been known by his name.

In his studies of the motions of Comets, of which Halley computed the orbits of twenty-four, he observed that a Comet of similar phenomena, recorded by Appian in 1531 and by Kepler in 1607, had swung through the same orbit as the Comet under his observation in 1682. Halley surmised from this that these Comets might be one and the same, whose intervals of return appeared to cover a period of seventy-five or seventy-six years. Halley's surmise seemed to be confirmed by the recorded appearance of similar bright Comets in the years 1456, 1378, and 1301, the intervals again being seventy-five or seventy-six years.

Halley was deeply imbued with Newton's new discovery of gravitation, for the publication of which Halley paid the expenses, so he brought the principles of Newton's theory of gravitation to bear on his own new theory of the motions of Comets. He rightly conjectured that Comets were drawn to our Sun across the disturbing orbits of our planetary system, and that the comparatively small differences of one or two years in the recorded intervals of this one Comet (Halley's Comet) were due to the attraction of the larger planets. 'During the previous year, 1681, Halley computed that the Comet had passed near the planet Jupiter, the attraction of which must have had a considerable influence on the Comet's motion. Making due allowance for this disturbing influence of Jupiter, he computed that the Comet would return to the vicinity of our Sun about the end of 1758 or beginning of 1759.

Halley's Comet

Halley did not live to see his prediction fulfilled (he died in 1742), but he wrote shortly before he died: "If this Comet should return according to our predictions about the year 1758, impartial posterity will not refuse to acknowledge that this was first discovered by an Englishman."

All through the year 1758 the most noted astronomers of Europe were on the lookout for the return of the predicted Comet. One of these astronomers, Messier, looked for it through his telescope at the Paris Observatory every night from sunset to sunrise throughout that whole year. On Christmas night, 1758, the Comet was first seen by a German peasant near Dresden, who had heard about the Comet and was looking for it. He was a man of unusually good eyesight, yet his discovery was doubted until Messier, nearly a month afterward, at Paris, "picked up" the Comet with his telescope.

From that time forth this Comet, which returned in 1835, and is reappearing in this year (1910), has been known as Halley's Comet.

Image Description: An image of Halley's Comet taken June 6, 1910. Date: June 6, 1910, published July 3, 1910 original article. Source: Purchased by The New York Times for publication. Author: The Yerkes Observatory.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1910, are now in the public domain.

Permission: Public Domain. By The Yerkes Observatory [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT CREDIT: Comet lore: Halley's comet in history and astronomy Author: Edwin Emerson, Publisher: Printed by the Schilling Press, 1910. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Aug 26, 2008, Length: 144 pages. Subjects: Comets, Halley's comet.

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Cinderella a quarter to twelve

At a quarter to twelve, Cinderella, remembering her Godmother's instructions, said good-bye to the Prince and came away.

She arrived home just as the clock struck twelve. At once the coachman and footmen turned back into rats and mice, and the coach into a pumpkin; and when the sisters came home a little later, there was Cinderella, dressed in her old shabby frock, sitting in her usual place amongst the cinders.

The two ugly sisters were full of the strange Princess who had come to the ball. They talked about her all the next day, little dreaming that all the while the beautiful lady was their despised sister Cinderella.

In the evening after they had gone again to the ball, the Fairy Godmother made her appearance. Once more Cinderella drove to the Palace in her coach and six; this time arrayed in a still more gorgeous and beautiful dress; and once more the Prince danced with her all the evening.

But when the third night came Cinderella was enjoying herself so much that she quite forgot what her Fairy Godmother had said, until suddenly she heard the clock begin to strike twelve. She remembered that as soon as it finished striking, all her fine clothes would turn to rags again; and, jumping up in alarm, she ran out of the room. The Prince ran after her, trying to overtake her; and Cinderella in her fright ran so fast that she left one of her little glass slippers on the floor behind her.

Cinderella a quarter to twelve

The Prince stopped to pick it up, and this gave Cinderella time to escape; but she was only just in time. Just as she was crossing the Palace yard, the clock finished striking, and immediately all her finery vanished; and there she was, dressed in her old ragged frock again.

When the Prince came out upon the Palace steps, he could see no sign of the lovely Princess. The guards at the gate told him that nobody at all had passed that way, except a little ragged kitchenmaid; and the Prince had to go back to the ball with only a little glass slipper to remind him of the beautiful lady with whom he was so desperately in love.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1917, are now in the public domain.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: Favorite fairy tales. Author: Logan Marshall. Publisher: John C. Winston, 1917. Original from: the New York Public Library. Digitized: Mar 30, 2010. Length: 256 pages. Subjects: Fairy tales.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Cinderella

At the end of one hour the work was done, and all flew out again at the windows. Then Cinderella brought the dish to her mother, overjoyed at the thought that now she should go to the feast. But she said, "No, no! Girl, you have no clothes and cannot dance, you shall not go." And when Cinderella begged very hard to go, she said, "If you can in one hour's time pick two of these dishes of peas out of the ashes, you shall go too." And thus she thought she should at last get rid of her. So she shook two dishes of peas into the ashes; but the little maiden went out into the garden at the back of the house, and cried as before—

"Hither, hither, through the sky. Turtle-doves and linnets, fly!

Blackbird, thrush, and chaffinch gay, Hither, hither, haste away!

One and all, come help me quick, Haste ye, haste ye—pick, pick, pick!"

Then first came two white doves in at the kitchen window; and next came the turtle-doves; and after them all the little birds under heaven came chirping and hopping about, and flew down about the ashes; and the little doves put their heads down and set to work, pick, pick, pick; and then the others began to pick, pick, pick; and they put all the good grain into the dishes, and left all the ashes, Before half-an-hour's time all was done, and out they flew again. And then Cinderella took the dishes to her mother, rejoicing to think that she should now go to the ball. But her mother said, "It is all of no use, you cannot go, you have no clothes, and cannot dance, and you would only put us to shame:" and off she went with her two daughters to the feast.


Now when all were gone, and nobody left at home, Cinderella went sorrowfully and sat down under the hazel-tree, and cried out—

"Shake, shake, hazel tree, Gold and silver over me!"

Then her friend the bird flew out of the tree and brought a gold and silver dress for her, and slippers of spangled silk; and she put them on, and followed her sisters to the feast. But they did not know her, and thought it must be some strange princess, she looked so fine and beautiful in her rich clothes; and they never once thought of Cinderella, but took for granted that she was safe at home in the dirt.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1921, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case JENNIE HARBOUR c 1893 - c 1959, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES ILLUSTRATED BY JENNIE HARBOUR c 1893 - c 1959. Cinderella Painted by Jennie Harbour.

EDITED BY CAPT. EDRIC VREDENBURG RAPHAEL TUCK &. SONS. LTP Publishers in Their Majesties the King & Queen LONDON & PARIS DESIGNED & PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN PHILADELPHIA DAVID MCKAY COMPANY WASHINGTON SQUARE 1921

Friday, November 11, 2011

Armistice Day November 11, 1918

In 1921, an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. This site, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River and the city of Washington, became the focal point of reverence for America's veterans.

Similar ceremonies occurred earlier in England and France, where an unknown soldier was buried in each nation's highest place of honor (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These memorial gestures all took place on November 11, giving universal recognition to the celebrated ending of World War I fighting at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). The day became known as "Armistice Day."

Armistice Day officially received its name in America in 1926 through a Congressional resolution. It became a national holiday 12 years later by similar Congressional action. If the idealistic hope had been realized that World War I was "the War to end all wars," November 11 might still be called Armistice Day. But only a few years after the holiday was proclaimed, war broke out in Europe. Sixteen and one-half million Americans took part. Four hundred seven thousand of them died in service, more than 292,000 in battle.

Armistice Day Changed To Honor All Veterans

An answer to the question of how to pay tribute to those who had served in this latest, great war came in a proposal made by Representative Edwin K. Rees of Kansas: Change Armistice Day to Veterans Day, and make it an occasion to honor those who have served America in all wars. In 1954 President Eisenhower signed a bill proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day.

Armistice Day November 11, 1918

Description: Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918. Date: 11 November 1918. Source: U.S. National Archive. Author: U.S. Army.

Permission: This image is a work of a U.S. Army soldier or employee, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain (17 U.S.C. § 101 and 105)

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

By U.S. Army (U.S. National Archive) [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT CREDIT: www.pica.army.mil

Thursday, November 10, 2011

New York City Veterans Day Parade

New York City Veterans Day Parade, Members of the 315th Airlift Wing, Joint Base Charleston, S.C. joined the mini C-17 replica in the annual New York City Veterans Day Parade. The parade, which is the largest of its kind in the country, covered more than 30 blocks down 5th Ave in midtown Manhattan and was viewed by millions of people around the world. (U.S. Air Force Photo/1st Lt Joe Simms)

Disclaimer: This Web site is provided as a public service by the 315th Airlift Wing (Public Affairs).

Information presented on this Web site is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain (17 U.S.C. § 101 and 105)

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New York City Veterans Day Parade

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

Veterans Day Eagle

World War I, then normally referred to simply as The Great War (no one could imagine any war being greater!), ended with the implementation of an armistice [temporary cessation of hostilities-in this case until the final peace treaty, the infamous Treaty of Versailles, was signed in 1919] between the Allies and Germany at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of November, 1918.

The original concept for the celebration was for the suspension of business for a two minute period beginning at 11 A.M., with the day also marked by parades and public mettings.

On the second anniversary of the armistice, France and the United Kingdom hold ceremonies honoring their unknown dead from the war.

Congress passes legislation approving the establishment of a Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery. November 11 is chosen for the date of the ceremony. According on October 20, Congress declares November 11, 1921 a legal Federal holiday to honor all those who participated in the war. The ceremony was conducted with great success.

Veteran's Day (color), Graphic by Tony Ramos, AFNEWS / NSPD

Overview: AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on AF.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

Veterans Day Eagle

This image is a work of a United States Department of Veterans Affairs employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Monday, November 07, 2011

Veterans Day 2011 Poster

World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” - officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words:

Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and

Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and

Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.

Veterans Day 2011 Poster

This image is a work of a United States Department of Veterans Affairs employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs - 810 Vermont Avenue, NW - Washington, DC 20420

Sunday, November 06, 2011

Christmas wreaths Arlington National Cemetery

Thousands of Christmas wreaths are nestled against headstones in Section 27 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on Dec. 15, 2005. Hundreds of volunteers gathered at Arlington to place more than five thousand donated Christmas wreaths on head stones in the cemetery. The 14th annual wreath laying event is a result of Worcester Wreath Company owner Morrill Worcester's boyhood dream of doing something to honor those laid to rest in the National Cemetery. DoD photo by Master Sgt. Jim Varhegyi, U.S. Air Force. (Released)

051215-F-3050V-029_screen.jpg

About Images on DefenseLINK: All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated. However, we request you credit the photographer, videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain (17 U.S.C. § 101 and 105)

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New York City Marathon Wounded Warriors

Veterans take on the New York City Marathon. Disabled veterans, members of the Achilles Freedom Team, crest a hill during the New York City Marathon Nov. 5. Nearly 50 veterans participated in the marathon as Achilles' wounded warriors. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Shad Eidson)

The Freedom Team is part of the Achilles Track Club, an international, nonprofit organization that supports people with all types of disabilities to participate in mainstream athletics, promote personal achievement and enhance self-esteem.

Overview: AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on AF.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain (17 U.S.C. § 101 and 105)

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

New York City Marathon

Saturday, November 05, 2011

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street. November 4, 2011 12PM The park was quiet and peaceful with very little evidence of the problems seen in the press.

i saw no lawless behavior, smelled no bad smells, heard no unusual amount of noise. The vibe seemed upbeat if a little tired. Lots of interesting sights and sounds combined for a political caucus meets Renaissance fair atmosphere.

i was met with polite and friendly greetings at every turn. No political or cultural statement intended, only my impressions as i encountered them on that day.

------------------------------

Zuccotti Park, formerly Liberty Plaza Park, is a 33,000-square-foot publicly accessible park in Lower Manhattan, New York City, privately owned by Brookfield Properties. The park was created in 1968 by United States Steel, after the property owners negotiated its creation with city officials, and named Liberty Plaza Park and situated beside One Liberty Plaza. It is located between Broadway, Trinity Place, Liberty Street and Cedar Street. The park's northwest corner is across the street from Four World Trade Center.

The park was damaged in the September 11 attacks of 2001. The plaza was used as the site of several events commemorating anniversaries of the attack. After renovations in 2006, the park was renamed by Brookfield Office Properties, after company chairman John Zuccotti.

In 2011, the plaza became the site of the Occupy Wall Street protest camp. During the demonstration, activists have occupied the plaza and used it as a staging ground for protests throughout the Manhattan Financial District.

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

TEXT RESOURCE: Zuccotti Park From Wikipedia

Friday, November 04, 2011

King James I of England The Gunpowder Plot

November 5, 1605, King James I of England & VI of Scotland learns of The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason to explode the Parliament building has been foiled hours before he was scheduled to sit with the rest of the British government in the state opening of the second session of James's first English Parliament general parliamentary session.

On the morning of Tuesday, the 5th of November, 1605, which day was appointed for the opening of a new Parliamentary session, London rang with the news that in the course of the night a diabolical plot had been discovered, by which the king and legislature were to have been destroyed at a blow. In a chamber beneath the House of Lords had been found a great quantity of gunpowder, and with it a man, calling himself John Johnson, who, finding that the game was up, fully acknowledged his intention to have fired the magazine while the royal speech was being delivered, according to custom, overhead, and so to have blown King, Lords, and Commons into the air. At the same time, he doggedly refused to say who were his accomplices, or whether he had any.

This is the earliest point at which the story of the Gunpowder Plot can be taken up with any certainty. Of what followed, at least as to the main outlines, we are sufficiently well informed. Johnson, whose true name was presently found to be Guy, or Guido, Faukes,1 proved, it is true, a most obstinate and unsatisfactory witness, and obstinately refused to give any evidence which might incriminate others. But the actions of his confederates quickly supplied the information which he withheld. It was known that the " cellar" in which the powder was found, as well as a house adjacent, had been hired in the name of one Thomas Percy, a Catholic gentleman, perhaps a kinsman, and certainly a dependent, of the Earl of Northumberland.

It was now discovered that he and others of his acquaintance had fled from London on the previous day, upon receipt of intelligence that the plot seemed at least to be suspected. Not many hours later the fugitives were heard of in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, and Staffordshire, the native counties of several amongst them, attempting to rally others to their desperate fortunes, and to levy war against the crown. For this purpose they forcibly seized cavalry horses2 at Warwick, and arms at Whewell Grange, a seat of .Lord Windsor's. These violent proceedings having raised the country behind them, they were pursued by the sheriffs with what forces could be got together, and finally brought to bay at Holbeche, in Staffordshire, the residence of one Stephen Littleton, a Catholic gentleman.

King James I of England The Gunpowder Plot

King James I of England Portrait painted by Paulus van Somer (c. 1577 – 1621), also known as Paulus van Somer, Flemish. James I of England & VI of Scotland, by Paul van Somer I. Oil on canvas, 196 x 120 cm, Museo del Prado, Madrid.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Paulus van Somer (c. 1577 – 1621) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT CREDIT: What was the Gunpowder Plot?: The traditional story tested by original evidence Author: John Gerard. Edition: 2. Publisher: Osgood, McIlvaine & Co., 1897. Length: 290 pages. Subjects, Conspiracy, Gunpowder Plot, 1605

Thursday, November 03, 2011

Joan of Arc Siege of Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier

November 4, 1429 – Joan of Arc liberates Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier.

At length Joan obtained Charles' permission to attack La Charite, where the enemy were in force, and from whence they threatened the French forts on the Loire. At Bourges she assembled a few troops, and in company with the Sire d'Albret she laid siege to Saint Pierre-leMoutier. Then, although feebly supported, Joan led the first column of attack. This attacking column might have been called a forlorn hope, so few men had she with her. The little party were repulsed, and at one moment her squire, d'Aulon, saw that his brave mistress was fighting alone, surrounded by the English. At great peril she was rescued from the melee.

Asked how she could hope to succeed in taking the place with hardly any support, she answered, while she raised her helmet, 'There are fifty thousand of my host around me,' alluding to the vision of angels that in moments of extreme peril she relied on. D'Aulon in vain urged her to beat a retreat, and retire to a place of safety; she insisted on renewing the attack, and gave orders for crossing the moat on logs and fascines. A roughly constructed bridge over the fosse was then made, and after a desperate struggle the fortress was taken.

This occurred early in the month of November (1429). A few years ago a stainedglass window commemorative of the Maid of Orleans having saved the church in Saint Pierre-le-Moutier (it had been converted by the besieged into a warehouse for the goods and chattels of the citizens) was placed in the building she had preserved from destruction.

Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc, Date: between 1450 and 1500. Medium: Oil on canvas. Current location: Centre Historique des Archives Nationales, Paris. Accession number: AE II 2490. Notes: Miniature.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT CREDIT: Joan of Arc, Author: Lord Ronald Sutherland Gower. Publisher: J. C. Nimmo, 1893 Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: May 13, 2008. Length: 334 pages.

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

New York City Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

New York City Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11. The rare early-season winter storm that affected the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast over the Halloween weekend broke record snowfall totals for ... New York's Central Park recorded 2.9 inches of snowfall during the storm.

During the Storm of October 29, 2011, the combination of heavy wet snow and trees with almost full foliage caused widespread damage and power outages.

The major early-season winter storm extented Friday 10/28/11 into Saturday 10/29/11 as an area of low pressure tracked up the East Coast, bringing significant snowfall from the central Appalachians into southern New England beginning on Friday night. Winter Storm Watches were in effect for parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, including the extreme northern and western suburbs of the Washington, D.C., metro area. Total snowfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches fell in the higher terrain of Virginia and West Virginia northeastward through eastern Pennsylvania, with a band of 8 to 10 inches from extreme northern Maryland northeastward through northern New Jersey and into western Massachusetts. Lighter snow accumulations fell in the major cities of the Mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, including Washington D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York city and Boston.

The images are from the morning of Monday 10/31/11 and follow the the park drive north from its entrance at 6th Avenue amd 58th street to Literary Walk that runs from 70th to 72 street.

New York Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

New York Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

New York Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

New York Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

New York Central Park Storm Damage 10/29/11

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

XIT Ranch Oldham County Texas

On November 2, 1912 the XIT Ranch sold its last head of cattle. The XIT operated in the Texas Panhandle from 1885 to 1912. Covering over 3,000,000 acres, it ran for two hundred miles along the New Mexico border, varying in width from 20 to 30 miles. The ranch included all or portions of Bailey, Castro, Cochran, Dallam, Deaf Smith, Hartley, Hockley, Lamb, Oldham and Parmer counties.

In 1879, the 16th Texas Legislature appropriated 3,000,000 acres of land to finance a new state capitol. In 1882 in a special legislative session, the 17th Legislature struck a bargain with Charles B. and John V. Farwell of Chicago, Illinois, under which a syndicate led by the Farwells, with mostly British investors, agreed to build a new $3,000,000.00 Texas State Capitol and accept the 3,000,000 acres of Panhandle land in payment.

Description: Oldham County ranch land in the Canadian Valley between Vega and Dalhart, Texas (2002)

Date: October 27, 2002 Author: Leaflet

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XIT Ranch Oldham County Texas

TEXT CREDIT: XIT Ranch From Wikipedia