Saturday, December 31, 2011

A happy new year Hebrew Publishing Co.

Title: A happy new year. Date Created / Published: [S.l.] : Hebrew Publishing Co., [between 1900 and 1920] Medium: 1 photomechanical print (postcard) : offset lithograph, color.

Summary: Print shows Moses and Aaron. Moses holds the Ten Commandment tablets, Aaron an incense burner. Between them are two vignettes relating to Moses' life. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-15864 (digital file from original print)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. Call Number: LOT 13151, no. 11, p. 6, bottom c-P&P Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case [between 1900 and 1920] , are now in the public domain.

Notes: Title from item. No. 6. Written on back: Best wishes for a Bright & Happy New Year. Mr. 7 Mrs. Sadler 1649 N. 8th St. [addressed to] Mr. & Mrs. N. Bendiener, 1719 N. 8th St., Phila. Forms part of: Ephemera from the Alfred Bendiner Memorial Collection (Library of Congress).

Subjects: Moses--1900-1920. Aron--(Biblical priest)--1900-1920. Biblical events--1900-1920. Format: Offset photomechanical prints--Color--1900-1920. Postcards--1900-1920. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

A happy new year Hebrew Publishing Co.

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Friday, December 30, 2011

Happy new year!

Title: Happy new year! Date Created/Published: N.Y. : Published by Keppler & Schwarzmann, Puck Building, 1910 December 28. Medium: 1 photomechanical print : offset, color.

Summary: Illustration shows Father Time ringing bells proclaiming "The Greatest Good for the Greatest Number", while a crowd in the street celebrates the New Year by using noisemakers, horns, drums, and cymbols to sound their personal causes, such as "Partisanship" and "Partisan Politics", "Ring Politics", "Spoils System", "Women's Rights", and "Calamity Howling".

Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-27697 (digital file from original print)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1910 c-P&P(Case X) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes: Title from item. Caption: Time, the Bell-Ringer Some year, perhaps, they'll stop their noise long enough to hear the chimes. Illus. in: Puck, v. 68, no. 1765 (1910 December 28), centerfold. Copyright 1910 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

Subjects: New Year--1910. Father Time (Symbolic character)--1910. Noise pollution--1910. Sounds--1910. Celebrations--1910. Crowds--1910.

Format: Cartoons (Commentary)--1910. Offset photomechanical prints--Color--1910. Periodical illustrations--1910. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Long Acre Square Times Square

The first New Year's Eve celebration is held in Times Square (then known as Longacre Square) in New York City, New York 1904.

At 41st street we get a nearer view of the tower-like building of the New York Times, sometimes called the "Andiron Building." The array of signs before us here is simply bewildering. Perhaps the most impressive of these is the one reminding us that it is time for a high ball, and incidentally giving us the exact time of the night.

Crossing 42nd street we reach another of the triangle "Squares," known as Long Acre Square, or by its new title of Times Square. With the continuous movement of business uptown, this section is now the center of the theater district, and has besides some of the newest and finest of the city's hotels.

In variety, size and ingenuity of electric signs the Great White Way is unsurpassed. Every trick and device that ingenuity can suggest and money produce seems to have found a place within these comparatively few blocks.

In some of the larger signs striking color effects are produced; as for example in the Levy sign depicting a female figure, and in the AnheuserBusch sign. Movements of various kinds are also one of the devices for attracting attention, the most conspicuous one being the Wilson High Ball sign, which changes every minute, thus giving the exact time.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1907, are now in the public domain.

Long Acre Square Times Square

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: Good Lighting and the Illuminating Engineer, Volume 1 Published: 1907. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Feb 3, 2010.

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Wounded Knee

Wounded Knee. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee Massacre, 7th Cavalry Regiment arrived led by Colonel James Forsyth kills 146 Lakota Sioux led by Spotted Elk (Big Foot). Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota,

Title: [Big Foot's camp three weeks after the Wounded Knee Massacre (Dec. 29, 1890), with bodies of several Lakota Sioux people wrapped in blankets in the foreground and U.S. soldiers in the background] Date Created / Published: c1891 Jan. 17.

Medium: 1 photographic print : albumen ; 9 x 11 in. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-15849 (digital file from original photo) LC-USZ62-46006 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 11347 [item] c-P&P Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes: Title devised by Library staff, based on information provided by Lise Broer, 2009. Copyrighted 1891 by Trager & Kuhn, Chadron, Nebr. This record contains unverified, old data from caption card. Exhibited: "Expanding Horizons" at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2009.

Subjects: Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890. Format: Albumen prints--1890-1900. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand

Wounded Knee photo image

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Wounded Knee photo image

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Title: Big Foot, chief of the Bules [sic] taken at the Battle of Wounded Knee, S.D. Creator(s): Trager and Kuhn, photographer. Date Created/Published: c1891. Medium: 1 photographic print on cabinet card mount. Summary: Body of Spotted Elk, chief of the Miniconjou, Lakota Sioux, lying in snow, after the Massacre at Wounded Knee, S.D., Dec. 29, 1890. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-116812 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 11347 item [P and P] Notes: Copyright by Northwestern Photo Co., Chadron, Nebraska. Title transcribed from text provided by the photographer on the original photo. Subjects: Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890. Indians of North America--South Dakota--Wounded Knee. Dead persons--South Dakota--Wounded Knee--1890-1900.

Format: Cabinet photographs--1890-1900. Photographic prints--1890-1900. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand


Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Professeur Wilhem Conrad Roentgen

December 28, 1895 – Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen publishes a paper detailing his discovery of a new type of radiation, which later will be known as x-rays.

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, X-ray Discovered: German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen, working with a cathode ray tube in his laboratory, in 1895, discovers "a new kind of ray that can travel great distances, penetrate solid matter, activate fluorescent screens, and expose photographic plates." He receives the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 for his work in discovering the X-ray.

Collection: Images from the History of Medicine (NLM) Title: Professeur Wilhem-Conrad Roentgen. Subject (Keyword): Rontgen, Wilhelm Conrad 1845-1923. Subject (Genre): Portraits Publication Information: [19--]

Copyright Statement: The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.

Order No.: B021997. Physical Description: 1 photomechanical reproduction : halftone. Image Description: Head and shoulders, right pose, full face. Note (General): Portrait no. 5767.10 Note (General): Professional references in French.

Restrictions on Access: HMD provides access to digital images in lieu of originals when electronic copies exist. Access to originals may require advance notice. Please see HMD Reference Librarian for more information.

Professeur Wilhem Conrad Roentgen

Source of Acquisition: Gift. Dr. Lassalle. 1953. URL: http://ihm.nlm.nih.… Call Number: Portrait no. 5767.10 Record UI: 101427411

TEXT CREDIT: Visible Proofs: Forensic Views of the Body: Galleries

Monday, December 26, 2011

St. Stephen's or Boxing Day

St. Stephen's, or Boxing Day. The old England St. Stephen's Day is chiefly celebrated •*• under the name of Boxing Day,— not for pugilistic reasons, but because on that day it was the custom for persons in the humbler walks of life to go the rounds with a Christmas-box and solicit money from patrons and employers. Hence the phrase Christmas-box came to signify gifts made at this season to children or inferiors, even after the boxes themselves had gone out of use. This custom was of heathen origin and carries us back to the Roman Paganalia when earthen boxes in which money was slipped through a hole were hung up to receive contributions at these rural festivals.

Aubrey in his " Wiltshire Collections" describes a trouvaille of Roman relics: "Among the rest was an earthen pot of the color of a crucible, and of the shape of a Prentice's Christmas-box with a slit in it, containing about a quart which was near full of money. This pot I gave to the Repository of the Royal Society at Gresham College."

Of the Prentice's Christmas-box, a recognized institution of the seventeenth century, several specimens are preserved, — small and wide bottles of thin clay from three to four inches in height, surrounded by imitation stoppers covered with a green baize. On one side is a slit for the introduction of money; the box must be broken before the money can be extracted.

Description: Eaton Centre Boxing Day 2010. Date: December 26, 2010. Author: Raysonho@Open Grid Scheduler.

St. Stephen's or Boxing Day

Permission: I, Raysonho@Open Grid Scheduler. the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In some countries this may not be legally possible; if so: I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

TEXT CREDIT: The Book of Christmas

Sunday, December 25, 2011

Bethlehem, Church of the Nativity

Title: Bethlehem. Church of the Nativity. Creator(s): Matson Photo Service, photographer. Date Created / Published: between 1950 and 1977. Medium: 1 slide : color ; 2 x 2 in. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-matpc-22859 (digital file from original photo)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. Photographs in the G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection are in the public domain.

The G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection is a rich source of historical images of the Middle East. The majority of the images depict Palestine (present day Israel and the West Bank) from 1898 to 1946. Most of the collection consists of over 22,000 glass and film photographic negatives and transparencies created by the American Colony Photo Department and its successor firm, the Matson Photo Service. Over 1,000 photographic prints and eleven albums are also part of this collection.

Call Number: LC-M305- SL6-204 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Notes: Title from: Matson color slides and filmstrips of Bible Lands ... , the Matson Photo Service. On slide mount: Church of the Nativity. On slide mount: Copyright Matson Photo Service.

Color slide reproduced from black and white negative or print which was handcolored, and then photographed with color film. Slide made from image taken earlier by either the American Colony Photo

Bethlehem. Church of the Nativity

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Department or the Matson Photo Service. Gift; Episcopal Home; 1978.

Subjects: West Bank--Bethlehem. Format: Slides. Collections: Matson (G. Eric and Edith) Photograph Collection. Part of: G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection.

The Church of the Nativity editing/sookietex More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2011/12/bethlehem-church-of-nativity.html

The Church of the Nativity is a basilica located in Bethlehem, Palestine. The church was originally commissioned in 327 AD by Constantine and his mother Helena over the site that is still traditionally considered to be located over the cave that marks the birthplace of Jesus.

Saturday, December 24, 2011

The Nativity

The opening chapters of two of our canonical Gospels, those of Matthew and Luke, are devoted to narratives of the birth and infancy of Jesus; the story in each case being entirely isolated from the body of the work, which starts abruptly thirty years later, as do the other two Gospels, with the baptism by John and the outset of the ministry.

It will be agreed that the incidents claimed as belonging to exterior history that happen to be involved in these narratives of the nativity cannot be satisfactorily treated as absolutely detached from the ordinary secular records of the country and period in which they took place, though they have been too often dealt with in that manner, but, on the contrary, if we are to form a sound judgment respecting them, they must be studied in intimate conjunction with authentic history.

It is proposed in the present work, not only to take note of what has been already pertinently advanced on the subject of the consistency with history of the incidents recorded in this part of the Gospel narratives, but to introduce further considerations called for by recent developments of the argument and rendered possible by the increasing precision of our knowledge of detail bearing on Egyptian and Roman contemporary history.

In carrying out this plan the actual story of the birth and parentage of Jesus in either Gospel will not be intruded on. This is in its simplest form but an episode of family life, separable from any outside national or political occurrences, and owing to the supernatural wonders that attended it, incapable either of proof by the demonstration that the reporters of it are found to have correctly represented historical events which they link with it, or of disproof in that they may have made statements which are not easily to be reconciled with what we know of the historic personages involved in the story.


I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

TEXT CREDIT: Our Records of the Nativity and modern historical research: a reply to Prof. Ramsey's thesis

Friday, December 23, 2011

The Journey of the Magi

The Journey of the Magi, a fragment of a picture with the Adoration of the Magi. Tempera on wood. Artist: Sassetta (1392–1450) Birth name: Stefano di Giovanni di Consolo da Cortona.

Date: c. 1432-1436. Current location: Metropolitan Museum.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case c. 1432-1436, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sassetta (1392–1450) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

THE JOURNEY OF THE MAGI

"Behold there came wise men from the East to Jerusalem saying, Where is He that is born King of the Jews}"—St. Matt. 2:1, 2.

The Perplexity Of The Wise Men.

The inner voice, confirmed by the guiding star, had led them far from home. They cared not whither it led, if it would but guide them to their King. They sacrificed friends, home, position, all to fulfil their vocation. God gives me guidance; He makes my duty clear, but I draw back.


Behold God honouring His Church. As they drew near to the Holy City He withdraws the light, for here the voice of the Church was to be heard. The chief priests and the scribes sat in Moses' seat; their voice was that of the living Church. God hushes the inner voice, and the glittering star no longer guides, to teach them to hear the Church.

Consider how they stood the test. With what simple humility do these strangers inquire: "Where is He that is born King of the Jews?" Not for a moment do they doubt that the mysterious leading was true, even though now all signs fail. Nor for a moment do they doubt that the voice of the Church would answer them aright. Their faith is rewarded. They receive their reply; they follow the direction of the Church. They find the divine Child "with Mary His Mother." They are admitted into the presence of God; they enter into the Communion of Saints.

The interpreters of the divine oracles sent the Magi to humble little Bethlehem to find the King. They went with as much faith as though they had been conducted to the porphyry chamber of the imperial palace; and "the star which they saw in the East went before them till it came and stood over where the young child was. And when they saw the star they rejoiced with exceeding great joy."

They sought Him in the King's palace; they found Him in a peasant's stable. But they hesitated not. "They fell down and worshipped Him." They needed not the outward trappings of royalty to convince them that He was their King. They had been true to the inner light, and the witness of their hearts did not fail them now. My Lord keeps tryst with me in the humble places, in every lowly happening of my daily life. But only through faithfulness in ordinary things can I hear His voice, can I see His face.

TEXT CREDIT: The infant king: the mysteries of Christmas in meditation, Author: Shirley Carter Hughson. Publisher: Holy Cross Press, 1920. Original from the University of Virginia. Digitized: Dec 13, 2010, Length 91 pages. Subjects, Religion › Holidays › Christmas & Advent, Christmas Religion / Holidays / Christmas & Advent

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Connie Mack, manager for the Philadelphia Athletics

Cornelius McGillicuddy, Sr. (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), better known as Connie Mack.

Title: Connie Mack, mgr., Phila. Am. Creator(s): Thompson, Paul, photographer. Date Created / Published: c1911 Jan 7. Medium: 1 photographic print : gelatin silver.

Summary: Photograph shows Connie Mack, manager for the Philadelphia Athletics, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front, wearing straw boater. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-18579 (digital file from original print)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case 1911, are now in the public domain.

Call Number: LOT 13830, no. 29 c-P&P Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes: J150377 U.S. Copyright Office. Title from item. Inscribed on negative: 513D. Handwritten on verso: Connie Mack, Phila. Am. Stamped on verso: Copyright by Paul Thompson, 10 Spruce Street, New York.

Subjects: Mack, Connie,--1862-1956. Philadelphia Athletics (Baseball team)--People--1910-1920. Baseball mangers--1910-1920. Format: Gelatin silver prints--1910-1920. Portrait photographs--1910-1920. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand

Connie Mack, manager for the Philadelphia Athletics

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Wednesday, December 21, 2011

The Mosaic menorah

The Mosaic menorah, according to the Talmud, stood 18 " tefahim " (1 tefah = 4 inches), or 72 inches, high, divided as follows: 3 tefahim for the tripod, including a "perah " (blossom in relief); 2 tefahim space; 1 tefah for a " gebia' " (cup or vase), " kaftor" (knob), and perah; 2 tefahim space; 1 tefah for a kaftor and branch on each side of the center shaft and a kaftor above the joint; 1 tefah space;

1 tefah for a kaftor and branch on each side and a kaftor above; 1 tefah space; 1 tefah for a kaftor and branch on each side and a kaftor above;

2 tefahim space; 3 tefahim for a cluster of three gebi'ot, a kaftor, and a perah on each of the branches and the center shaft (Men. 28b).

The gebia' is described as resembling an Alexandrian cup; the kaftor resembled the half of an apple; the perah resembled a blossom carved on pillars. Altogether there were 22 gebi'im, 11 kaftorim, and 9 perahim (ib.; see accompanying illustration). Maimonides further explains that the gebia' was broad at the top and narrow at the bottom (probably in the style of a flower-vase); the kaftor was somewhat egg-shaped with pointed tops; the perah looked like a dish with the. brim doubled outward (" Yad," Bet ha-Behirah, iii. 1-11). The spread of the branches was 9 tefahim (36 inches), and there was the same measure for the tripod (" Shilte haGibborim," ch. xxxi.).

The branches of the lamps had the apertures in which the wicks were placed turned toward the center lamp, which was known as "Ner ha-Ma'arabi " (= " the Western Lamp ") because it was next to the branches on the east side (Rashi on Shab. 22b). For, according to the Talmud, the menorah was so placed that its two branches Position, pointed toward the east and west respectively.

The Mosaic menorah

A similar rule applied to all vessels in theTemplc (Men. xi. 7), except the Ark. Maimonides, however, holds the opinion, also expressed in the Talmud, that the menorah, like the Ark, was placed at right angles to the length of the Temple, i.e., pointing north and south and facing east and west. But this theory appears to be untenable. It was opposed by Abraham ibn Daud (RaBaD) and was strongly attacked in "Shilte haGibborim" (xxxi. 26b).

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case 1912, are now in the public domain.

IMAGE and TEXT CREDIT: The Jewish encyclopedia: a descriptive record of the history, religion, literature, and customs of the Jewish people from the earliest times to the present day, Volume 8. Authors: Isidore Singer, Cyrus Adler Publisher: Funk and Wagnalls, 1912. Subjects: Jews

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Baby New Year reluctant to enter on the duties given by Father Time

NEW YEAR'S DAY, the first day of the year, for many ages and in various parts of the world celebrated as a religious and social festival. With the post-biblical Jews the new year commenced and still commences with the autumnal month Tisri, the first day being celebrated by them with considerable ceremony. The Romans made an especial holiday of it, offering sacrifices to Janus, whose principal festival occurred on this day, and taking care that all they thought, said, and did should be pure and favorable, since every thing was ominous for the occurrences of the whole year.

They appeared in the streets in festive garments, exchanged kindly salutations, and gave to each other presents called strence, consisting of gilt dates, figs, honey cakes, and copper coins having on one side the double head of Janus and on the other a ship. This custom of bestowing presents was made by some of tho emperors an important source of their personal revenue, until modified by a decree of the emperor Claudius. The early Christian emperors however continued to receive them, notwithstanding they were condemned by tho ecclesiastical councils on account of the pagan ceremonies at their presentation.

Prynne in his "Ilistrio-Mastix," referring to the hostility of the early church to any imitation among Christians of the Roman saturnalia, says: "The whole Catholic church appointed a solemn public fast upon this our new year's day, to bewail those heathenish interludes, sports, and lewd idolatrous practices, which had been used on it; prohibiting all Christians, under pain of excommunication, from observing the calends or first of January (which wee now call new year's day) as holy, and from sending abroad new year's gifts upon it (a custom now too frequent), it being a mere religion of paganism and idolatry, derived from the heathen Romans' feast of two-faced Janus, and a practice so execrable unto Christians, that not only the whole Catholic church, but even the four famous councils of (here follows a long array of authorities) have positively prohibited the solemnization of new year's day, and the sending abroad of new year's gifts, under an anathema and excommunication." The bestowal of gifts upon new year's day was not peculiar to the Romans.

Baby New Year reluctant to enter on the duties given by Father Time

The druids distributed branches of the sacred mistletoe, cut with peculiar ceremonies, as new year's gifts among the people; and the Saxons of the north, according to Bishop Stillingfleet, observed the festival with more than ordinary jollity and feasting, and by sending gifts to one another.

#ThrowBackThursday 1902 is suspicious. Baby New Year of 1902 reluctant to enter on the duties given by Father Time. French caricature by Achille Lemot (1846-1909).

"Now your turn dear ... c'mon! No, Daddy if it becomes so bad in one year, I'd rather not go."

More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2011/12/baby-new-year-reluctant-to-enter-on.html

SOURCE: The Pilgrim, No. 1305, January 5, 1902, back cover.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case 1902, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Achille Lemot (1846-1909) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

By Achille Lemot (1846-1909) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT CREDIT: The new American cyclopædia: a popular dictionary of general knowledge, Volume 12

Monday, December 19, 2011

Flying Tigers Curtiss P-40E Warhawk

This day in history – the first battle of the WWII “Flying Tigers” on December 20, 1941.

DAYTON, Ohio -- Flying Tigers, Curtiss P-40E Warhawk at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

www.nationalmuseum.af.mil is provided as a public service by the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Public Affairs.

Information presented on www.nationalmuseum.af.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

The Flying Tigers were officially called the American Volunteer Group, and were known for their planes with iconic shark faces on them. They were equipped and recruited in the spring and summer of 1941, with the express purposed of aiding the Chinese in theater against the Japanese. The group trained at a Royal Air Force airfield in Burma that fall, but it was not until after the Pearl Harbor attack on 07 December 1941 that the group went into combat. They were led by Lieutenant General Claire Lee Chennault (September 6, 1893 – July 27, 1958).

Flying Tigers Curtiss P-40E Warhawk

During the Flying Tigers early battles in late 1941 and early 1942, they had success at what was otherwise a low point in the war. They were paid combat bonuses for destroying almost 300 enemy aircraft, and lost only 14 pilots on combat missions. There were 100 pilots – 60 from the US Navy and US Marine Corps, and 40 from the US Army Air Corps (the latter began at Fort Monmouth).

Because the group were private military contractors, and not military, that these volunteers have occasionally been considered mercenaries.

TEXT CREDIT: CECOM Historical Office

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come Christmas Carol Dickens

The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery.

It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. But for this it would have been difficult to detach its figure from the night, and separate it from the darkness by which it was surrounded.

He felt that it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread. He knew no more, for the Spirit neither spoke nor moved.

“I am in the presence of the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come?” said Scrooge.

The Spirit answered not, but pointed onward with its hand.

“You are about to show me shadows of the things that have not happened, but will happen in the time before us,” Scrooge pursued. “Is that so, Spirit?”

The upper portion of the garment was contracted for an instant in its folds, as if the Spirit had inclined its head. That was the only answer he received.

Although well used to ghostly company by this time, Scrooge feared the silent shape so much that his legs trembled beneath him, and he found that he could hardly stand when he prepared to follow it. The Spirit paused a moment, as observing his condition, and giving him time to recover.

Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come Christmas Carol Dickens

But Scrooge was all the worse for this. It thrilled him with a vague uncertain horror, to know that behind the dusky shroud, there were ghostly eyes intently fixed upon him, while he, though he stretched his own to the utmost, could see nothing but a spectral hand and one great heap of black.

“Ghost of the Future!” he exclaimed, “I fear you more than any spectre I have seen. But as I know your purpose is to do me good, and as I hope to live to be another man from what I was, I am prepared to bear you company, and do it with a thankful heart. Will you not speak to me?”

It gave him no reply. The hand was pointed straight before them.

“Lead on!” said Scrooge. “Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!”

The Phantom moved away as it had come towards him. Scrooge followed in the shadow of its dress, which bore him up, he thought, and carried him along.

Title: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator and Frederick Barnard (1846 London - September 1896).

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case 1845, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case John Leech 29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: A CHRISTMAS CAROL IN PROSE BEING A Ghost Story of Christmas BY CHARLES DICKENS WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN LEECH

Friday, December 16, 2011

Burdock (Arctium tomentosum)

Bracts of the involucre glabrous or nearly so. 1. A. minus. Bracts of the involucre copiously woolly. 2. A. tomentosum.

1. Arctium minus Schk. Common. Burdock. (Man. p. i030; I. F. f. 4057.) In waste places, throughout eastern North America. Nat. from Eu.—Pennsylvania: Common throughout the State.

2. Arctium tomentosum (Lam.) Schk. Woolly Or Cottony BurDock. (Man. p. i030 ; I. F. f. 4055.) In waste places, N. B. to Mass. and southern N. Y. Adv. from Eu.—Pennsylvania: Delaware.

1. Arctium tomentosum (Lam.) Schk. Woolly Or Cottony Burdock. (I. F. f. 4055.) Similar to the following species. Heads 16-20 mm. broad, corymbose at the ends of the branches, mostly long-peduncled; bracts of the involucre densely cottony, the inner ones erect and somewhat shorter than the flowers. Ia waste places, N. B. to Mass. and southern N. Y. Adventive from Europe. JulyAug.

2. Arctium Lappa L. Great Bur, Burdock, Or Clotbur. (L F. f. 4056.) Stem much branched, 12-27 dm. high. Leaves thin, broadly ovate, pale and tomentose-canescent beneath, obtuse, entire, repand or dentate, mostly cordate, the lower often 4.5 dm. long; petioles solid, deeply furrowed; heads clustered or subcorymbose, sometimes long-peduncled, 3-4 cm. broad; bracts of the involucre glabrous or nearly so, their spines all spreading; corolla-tube longer than the limb. In waste places, N. B. and Ont to southern N. Y., and locally in the interior. Nat. from Europe. July-Oct.

3. Arctium minus Schk. Common Burdock. (L F. f. 4057.) Smaller than the preceding species, seldom over 15 dm. high. Leaves similar, the lower deeply cordate; petioles hollow, not deeply furrowed; heads numerous, racemose on the branches, short-peduncled or sessile; bracts of the involucre glabrous or slightly cottony, the spines of the outer ones spreading, those of the inner erect and shorter than the flowers; corolla-tube about as long as the limb. In waste places, common throughout our area. Nat. from Europe. July-Nov.

Burdock (Arctium tomentosum)

ARCTIUM, burdock, a genus of the polygamia order, and syngenesia class of plants; and in the natural method ranking under the 49fh order, composite capitate : the calyx is globular, with scales having hooks reflected at the tops. There are three species, vis.

1. Arctium lappa ; 2. Arctium personata ; and, 3. Arctium tomentosum. They are all troublesome weeds. Tbe tenderstems of the lappa, or common burdock, however, deprived of the bark, may be boiled and eaten like asparagus. When raw, they are good with oil and vinegar. Boys catch bats by throwing the prickly heads of this species into the air. The seeds, which have a bitterish subacrid taste, are recommended as very efficacious diuretics, given either in the form of emulsion, or in powder, to the quantity of a drachm. The roots, which taste sweetish, with a slight austerity and bitterishness, are esteemed aperient, diuretic, and sudorific ; and said to act without irritation, so as to be safely ventured upon in acute disorders.

Burdock and Velcro
After taking his dog for a walk one day in the early 1940s, George de Mestral, a Swiss inventor, became curious about the seeds of the burdock plant that had attached themselves to his clothes and to the dog's fur. Under a microscope, he looked closely at the hook-and-loop system that the seeds use to hitchhike on passing animals aiding seed dispersal, and he realised that the same approach could be used to join other things together. The result was Velcro.

I (Epukas), the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In some countries this may not be legally possible; if so: I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

TEXT CREDIT: TEXT RESOURCE: Burdock From Wikipedia

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Frigga Spinning the Clouds

Frigga was goddess of the atmosphere, or rather of the clouds, and as such was represented as wearing either snow-white or dark garments, according to her somewhat variable moods. She was queen of the gods, and she alone had the privilege of sitting on the throne Hlidskialf, beside her august husband. From thence she too could look over all the world and see what was happening, and, according to the belief of our ancestors, she possessed the knowledge of the future, which, however, no one could ever prevail upon her to reveal, thus proving that Northern women could keep a secret inviolate.

She was generally represented as a tall, beautiful, and stately woman, crowned with heron plumes, the symbol of silence or forgetfulness, and clothed in pure white robes, secured at the waist by a golden girdle, from which hung a bunch of keys, the distinctive sign [43]of the Northern housewife, whose special patroness she was said to be. Although she often appeared beside her husband, Frigga preferred to remain in her own palace, called Fensalir, the hall of mists or of the sea, where she diligently plied her wheel or distaff, spinning golden thread or weaving long webs of bright-coloured clouds.

In order to perform this work she made use of a marvellous jewelled spinning wheel or distaff, which at night shone brightly in the sky as a constellation, known in the North as Frigga’s Spinning Wheel, while the inhabitants of the South called the same stars Orion’s Girdle.

To her hall Fensalir the gracious goddess invited husbands and wives who had led virtuous lives on earth, so that they might enjoy each other’s companionship even after death, and never be called upon to part again.

Frigga Spinning the Clouds

Frigga was therefore considered the goddess of conjugal and motherly love, and was specially worshipped by married lovers and tender parents. This exalted office did not entirely absorb her thoughts however, for we are told that she was very fond of dress, and whenever she appeared before the assembled gods her attire was rich and becoming, and her jewels chosen with much taste.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1909, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case John Charles Dollman (1851–1934) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

John Charles Dollman [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas By H. A.(Hélène Adeline) Guerber Author of “The Myths of Greece and Rome” etc. (1909). Illustration by: John Charles Dollman (1851–1934) London George G. Harrap & Company 15 York Street Covent Garden 1909.

JANUS Happy New Year

JANUS Happy New Year: Janus Was a deity'unknown to the Greeks, but from the earliest times held in high estimation by the Romans, who placed him on almost an equal footing with Jupiter, even giving his name precedence in their prayers, and invoking the aid of both deities previous to every undertaking. To him they ascribed the origin of all things, the introduction of the system of years, the change of season, the ups and downs of fortune, and the civilization of the human race by means of agriculture, industry, arts, and religion.

According to the popular belief, Janus was an ancient king who had come in remote early times from Greece to Latium, there instituted the worship of the gods, and the erection of temples, and himself deserved high honours like a god, for this reason, that he had conferred the greatest boon upon mankind by his instructions in many important ways. In some of the stories he is confounded with Saturn. In others it is said that Saturn, driven out of Greece, took refuge with Janus in Latium, and shared the government with him.

It is easy to explain the great honour paid to Janus by a people like the Romans, who, as a rule, had this peculiarity of pondering well the prospects of an undertaking before entering upon it. The beginning of everything was a matter of great importance to them, and Janus was the god of a "good beginning." It is in this spirit that the Roman poet, Ovid, makes Janus say, "Everything depends on the beginning." Even when Jupiter had consented to an enterprise, prosperity in carrying it out was believed to be under the control of Janus, and, accordingly, great stress was laid on the circumstances attending the commencement of any project. Janus opened and closed all things. He sat, not only on the confines of the earth, but also at the gates of heaven. Air, sea, and land were in the hollow of his hands. The world moved on its hinges at his command.

JANUS Happy New Year

"In accordance with this belief, he was represented, as in "Plate XVII., seated, with two heads, one being that of "a youth, to indicate 'beginning,' the other that of an "old man, to indicate the 'end,' whence he was styled "Bifrons (two-headed). In his left hand is a key to show "that he opens at the beginning, and shuts at the end; "the sceptre in his right is a sign that he controls the pro"gress of every undertaking."

The first day of January, a month named after him, being the first day of a new year, was the occasion of a celebration in his honour'. At the beginning of every month the priests offered sacrifice to him at twelve altars. He was invoked every morning as the beginner of a new day. Even at the sacrifices to other gods he was remembered, and received offerings of wine and cakes, incense, and other things. The husbandman prayed to him at the beginning of seed-time. When war was declared, he was invoked.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1873, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Alexander Stuart Murray (8 January 1841 – March, 1904), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: Manual of mythology. Author: Alexander Stuart Murray. Published: 1873 Original from: Oxford University. Digitized: Jun 30, 2006

FOUNDED ON THE WORKS OF PETISCUS, PRELLER, AND WEl.CKER. BY ALEXANDER S. MURRAY, DEPARTMENT OF GKEEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES, BRITISH MU6EUM. LONDON ASHER AND CO., 13, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C. I873.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Santa Claus Making Deliveries

IF only I were Santa Claus and you were still a boy, I'd find the chimney to your heart and fill it full of joy;

On Christmas Eve when all was still and you were fast asleep , Much like your Santa Claus of old unto your bed I'd creep.

And in the pack upon my back all shining, bright and new I would have gathered everything to help and comfort you.

I'd tiptoe round about your life as Santa round a bed, Until with happiness and peace I knew your path was spread.

WERE there a single line of care upon your kindly face I'd find the cause that marked it there and banish every trace. I'd fill your breast with songs of love, your face

I'd deck with smiles And roses red should mark your path for miles and miles and miles;

And as I looked into your heart, while you so soundly slept, I'd find the hidden closet where your dearest hopes are kept,

The sacred dreams of long ago, the deeds you hoped to do And one and all, before I left, I'd realise for you.

О tawdry gift of tinsel cheap would ever I bestow, With joy your eyes should wake to smile, with health your cheeks should glow;

I'd search the corners of your heart where all your griefs are stored. And in the morning bright you'd find that on them I had poured.


The oil of consolation sweet and changed their stings to be The hallowed and the precious calm of sainted memory.

I'd make of you a happy friend, I'd robe you with content, I'd strew your counterpane with joys that night before I went.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case c1911, are now in the public domain.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: If only I were Santa Claus Author: Edgar Albert Guest. Publisher: T.P. Henry, 1914. Original from: the University of Michigan. Digitized: Sep 9, 2009. Subjects: Poetry › American › General. American poetry / Poetry / American / General Poetry / Anthologies / Santa Claus.

Monday, December 12, 2011

Washington at Valley Forge

Title: [Washington at Valley Forge] / E. Percy Moran. Creator(s): Moran, Percy, 1862-1935, artist, Date Created / Published: c1911. Medium: 1 photomechanical print : halftone, color. Summary: George Washington on horseback in snow at Valley Forge.

Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-3793 (color film copy slide) LC-USZ62-51810 (b&w film copy neg.) LC-USZCN4-331 (color film copy neg.) Call Number: LOT 10043 [item] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes: K25716 U.S. Copyright Office. Reproduction of painting by Edward P. Moran.

Subjects: Washington, George,--1732-1799--Military service. United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--Military personnel. Military camps--Pennsylvania--Valley Forge--1770-1880.

Format: Conjectural works. Halftone photomechanical prints--Color--1910-1920. Paintings--Reproductions. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

December 19, 1777, Washington's poorly fed, ill-equipped army, weary from long marches, staggered into Valley Forge, winds blew as the 12,000 Continentals prepared for winter's fury. Only about 1/3 of them had shoes, and many of their feet were leaving bloody footprints from the marching. Grounds for brigade encampments were selected, and defense lines were planned and begun. Though construction of more than a thousand huts provided shelter, it did little to offset the critical shortages that continually plagued the army.

Washington at Valley Forge

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case c1911, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Percy Moran, 1862-1935 and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT RESOURCE: Valley Forge From Wikipedia

Sunday, December 11, 2011

Christmas Tree Amsterdam Avenue and 83rd Street Upper West Side NYC

This photo taken by sookietex on Manhattan's Upper West Side at 83rd Street and Amsterdam Avenue December 18th 2009

The fir is undoubtedly the Christmas tree par excellence, especially in the northwestern and Lake States, on account of its long, horizontally spreading, springy branches, and its deep green and fragrant foliage which persists longer than that of almost any other evergreen. In the northeastern and Lake States it is the balsam fir (Abies balsamca) that furnishes the bulk of the Christmas tree trade; in the South it is the Fraser fir (Abies frascri) which figures as a Christmas tree but less frequently than other more accessible conifers, since the fir is confined exclusively to the tops of mountains throughout North Carolina and Tennessee. In Colorado and other Rocky Mountain States, fir, though abundant, is difficult of access and is used only sporadically, giving its place to lodgepole pine. Douglas fir. and occasionally to Engelmann spruce. On the Pacific Coast it is principally the white fir (Abies con color ) that is used as a Christmas tree.

The spruces vie with the firs in popularity as Christmas trees, but as a rule in the South and West they grow at high altitudes which makes them also difficult to get at, and are therefore substituted hy less suitable but more accessible conifers. Black spruce is the tree most seen in New York and Philadelphia. Throughout the States of Illinois and Ohio nurserymen supply the local demand with nursery grown Norway spruce.

The pines are in great demand for Christmas trees when fir and spruce are not available, or are only to be had at a high price. Throughout Maryland, Virginia, and in Washington the scrub pine (Pinus virginiana) finds a way into many homes for use in this capacity; while in southern Wyoming the lodge pole pine is almost the only species available for Christmas trees.


The center of the Christmas tree industry lies in the big cities of the East. New York City and the New England States consumes nearly half of all the output. Nowhere does a Christmas tree furnish such enjoyment as in the North where its green foliage is so suggestive of summer during the black days of winter—and especially in big cities where evergreen trees can be seen only in the parks.

Maine. New Hampshire, the Berkshire Hills in Massachusetts, the Adirondacks and the Catskills in New York are the sources of supply for New York, Philadelphia and Boston, and even for Haitimore and Washington. The swamps of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota furnish the markets of Chicago, St. Paul, and Minneapolis.

TEXT CREDIT: The Guide to Nature, Volume 10

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback

Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (May 10, 1837 – December 21, 1921) was the first person of African American descent to become governor of a U.S. state. A Republican, he served as the 24th Governor of Louisiana from December 9, 1872, to January 13, 1873.

After the Civil war, Pinchback returned to New Orleans and became active in the Republican Party, participating in Reconstruction state conventions. In 1868, he organized the Fourth Ward Republican Club in New Orleans.

After his governorship, Pinchback remained active in politics and public service. In the elections of 1874 and 1876, Pinchback was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and then the U.S. Senate, another pioneering accomplishment as the state's first African American representative to Washington. Both election results were contested, and his Democratic opponents were seated instead. It was the beginning of a reversal of the political gains African Americans had achieved since the war's end.

Nicholas Lemann, in Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, described Pinchback as "an outsized figure: newspaper publisher, gambler, orator, speculator, dandy, mountebank.

Title: Gov. Pinchback Date Created / Published: [between 1870 and 1880] Medium: 1 negative : glass, wet collodion. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpbh-03857 (digital file from original neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case c1875, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Mathew Brady (1823–1896) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback

Call Number: LC-BH826- 3467. Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Notes: Title from unverified information on negative sleeve. Annotation from negative, penciled on tape: 2 of this. Forms part of Brady-Handy Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).

Format: Glass negatives--1870-1880. Portrait photographs--1870-1880. Collections: Brady-Handy Collection.

TEXT RESOURCE: P. B. S. Pinchback From Wikipedia

Friday, December 09, 2011

The Grateful Dead

December 4, 1965 San Jose Acid Test at Big Nig's House. The first appearance as "The Grateful Dead".

December 10, 1965 – The Grateful Dead's first concert performance under this new name. Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California.

The founding members of the Grateful Dead were Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals), Bob Weir (guitar, vocals), Ron "Pigpen" McKernan (keyboards, harmonica, vocals), Phil Lesh (bass, vocals), and Bill Kreutzmann (drums). Lesh was the last member to join the Warlocks before they became the Grateful Dead.

Origin: San Francisco, California, U.S. Genres: Rock. Years active: 1965–1995. Labels: Warner Bros., Grateful Dead, Arista, Rhino. Associated acts: The Other Ones, The Dead, Jerry Garcia Band, RatDog, Phil Lesh and Friends, Rhythm Devils, BK3, Donna Jean Godchaux Band, Heart of Gold Band, Missing Man Formation, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Old and in the Way, Legion of Mary, Reconstruction, Jerry Garcia Acoustic Band, Kingfish, Bobby and the Midnites, The Tubes, Bruce Hornsby, Bob Dylan, Furthur, 7 Walkers

Past members: Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann, Ron "Pigpen" McKernan, Mickey Hart, Robert Hunter, Tom Constanten, Keith Godchaux, Donna Jean Godchaux, Brent Mydland, Vince Welnick, Bruce Hornsby.

Description: Denver, Colorado concert, Bill Kreutzmann playing the talking drum. Date: At least 1979 - notice Brent Mydland, who joined in April of 1979, in the background above Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir.

The Grateful Dead

Author: Marcia Wright. Permission: I (Marcia Wright), the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In some countries this may not be legally possible; if so: I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Christmas Wreath

Photo taken in the West End Collegiate Historic District at West End Avenue and 76th street NYC SW corner.

Since the classical use and symbolism of wreaths, the meaning and representation has taken on differing views, depending on the culture. In Christianity, wreaths are used to prepare for the Advent season or the "coming of Christ." The first known association with these now modern day wreaths dates back to the Lutherans in Germany in the 16th century. In 1839, Johann Hinrich Wichern used a wreath made from a cart wheel to educate children about the meaning and purpose of Christmas, as well as to help them count its approach.

For every Sunday of Advent, starting with the fourth Sunday before Christmas, he would put a white candle in the wreath and for every day in between he would use a red candle. The Advent wreath is constructed of evergreens to represent everlasting life brought through Jesus and the circular shape of the wreath represents God, with no beginning and no end. The Advent wreath is now a popular symbol in preparation for the coming of Christ, to mark the beginning of the Christian Church’s year and as décor during the Christmas festivities.

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If These images is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.


TEXT RESOURCE: Wreath From Wikipedia

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Japanese Pearl Harbor Strike Fleet November 26, 1941, December 7, 1941

Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the Japanese fleet, devised a plan to immobilize the U.S. fleet at the outset of the war with a surprise attack.

The key elements in Yamamoto's plans were meticulous preparation, the achievement of surprise, and the use of aircraft carriers and naval aviation on an unprecedented scale. In the spring of 1941, Japanese carrier pilots began training in the special tactics called for by the Pearl Harbor attack plan.

In October 1941 the naval general staff gave final approval to Yamamoto's plan, which called for the formation of an attack force commanded by Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It centered around six heavy aircraft carriers (Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū, Hiryū, Shōkaku, and Zuikaku) accompanied by 24 supporting vessels. A separate group of submarines was to sink any American warships which escaped the Japanese carrier force.

Nagumo's fleet assembled in the remote anchorage of Tankan Bay in the Kurile Islands and departed in strictest secrecy for Hawaii on 26 November 1941. The ships' route crossed the North Pacific and avoided normal shipping lanes. At dawn 7 December 1941, the Japanese task force had approached undetected to a point slightly more than 200 miles north of Oahu.

At 6:00 a.m. on 7 December, the six Japanese carriers launched a first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers, dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fighters.

Japanese aircraft carrier Zuikaku

Japanese aircraft carrier Zuikaku just leaving Hitokappu Bay for Pearl Harbor. Sailors were winching up the anchor on the quarter-deck. Date: 26 November 1941

These photographic images were published before December 31st 1956, or photographed before 1946 and not published for 10 years thereafter, under jurisdiction of the Government of Japan. Thus these photographic images are considered to be public domain according to article 23 of old copyright law of Japan and article 2 of supplemental provision of copyright law of Japan.

[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons, User Suiten

Japanese aircraft carrier Shokaku

Photo #: 80-G-71198 Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941

Japanese naval aircraft prepare to take off from an aircraft carrier (reportedly Shokaku) to attack Pearl Harbor during the morning of 7 December 1941. Plane in the foreground is a "Zero" Fighter.

This is probably the launch of the second attack wave. The original photograph was captured on Attu in 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives Collection.

This is a World Wide Web site for official information about the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and naval history. It is provided as a public service by the NHHC. The purpose is to provide information and news about the Naval History and Heritage Command and naval history to the general public.

All information on this site is in the public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.


TEXT CREDIT: Overview of The Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

USS Arizona (BB-39) Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941 August 1, 2002

USS Arizona (BB-39) Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941. Photo #: 80-G-K-13513 (Color) Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941

The forward magazines of USS Arizona (BB-39) explode after she was hit by a Japanese bomb, 7 December 1941. Frame clipped from a color motion picture taken from on board USS Solace (AH-5).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection. Note: The motion picture from which this image is taken is shown backwards, with the fireball oriented to the left. The image is correctly oriented as shown here.

This is a World Wide Web site for official information about the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and naval history. It is provided as a public service by the NHHC. The purpose is to provide information and news about the Naval History and Heritage Command and naval history to the general public.

All information on this site is in the public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

USS Arizona Pearl Harbor 1941

Image: 020801-N-3228G-001.jpg. Description: USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) passes the Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

020801-N-3228G-001 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Aug. 1, 2002) -- Sailors man-the-rails aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) showing their pride and respect as they pass the Arizona Memorial, while an SH-60F “Seahawk” helicopter hovers overhead. The Lincoln got underway July 20th from its homeport in Everett, in Washington state, and is scheduled to conduct missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U. S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class William R. Goodwin. (RELEASED)

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USS Arizona (BB-39) Pearl Harbor August 1, 2002

This image is a work of a United States Department of Defence employee, taken or made during the course of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

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Monday, December 05, 2011

Tiger Lily

{EAV:f33d6c40e8b76b13} The Peter Pan Alphabet By Oliver Herford (1863–1935). New York Charles Scribner’s Sons 1907. COPYRIGHT 1907 BY OLIVER HERFORD WITH PICTURES BY THE AUTHOR PUBLISHED JANUARY 1907.

Peter had saved Tiger Lily from a dreadful fate, and now there was nothing she and her braves would not do for him. All night they sat above, keeping watch over the home under the ground and awaiting the big attack by the pirates which obviously could not be much longer delayed. Even by day they hung about, smoking the pipe of peace, and looking almost as if they wanted tit-bits to eat.

They called Peter the Great White Father, prostrating themselves before him; and he liked this tremendously, so that it was not really good for him.

"The great white father," he would say to them in a very lordly manner, as they grovelled at his feet," is glad to see the Piccaninny warriors protecting his wigwam from the pirates."

"Me Tiger Lily," that lovely creature would reply, "Peter Pan save me, me his velly nice friend. Me no let pirates hurt him."

Bringing up the rear, the place of greatest danger, comes Tiger Lily, proudly erect, a princess in her own right. She is the most beautiful of dusky Dianas and the belle of the Piccaninnies, coquettish, cold and amorous by turns; there is not a brave who would not have the wayward thing to wife, but she staves off the altar with a hatchet.

A ROUND ROBIN TO J. M. BARRIE

From His Humble and Devoted Servants
THE ALPHABET

The Lord forgive if we transgress
Thus to familiarly address
One of our betters.
But Jamie, do you no recall
The slate whereon you learned to scrawl
Your Humble Letters?

Well we remember how you drew
Our shapely features all askew,
Unflattering really.
You made A lame and B too fat
And C too curly—what of that!
We loved you dearly.

From that first day we owned your spell,
And just because you used us well
We served you blindly.
Why, even when you put us through
A fearsome Scottish Reel, we knew
You meant it kindly.

Jamie, ’tis said Grand Tales there be
Still biding in the A B C—
If this be true,
Quick Jamie! Cast your golden net.
Maybe we have the grandest yet
In store for you.

Tiger Lily

I’s for the Indian Girl

Peter Pan was too coy for the Indian Miss;
She sighed for his scalp—all she got was a kiss.

K stands for a Kiss

K stands for a Kiss? Oh, stern featured K!
Who would have suspected—You’d leanings that way!
Peter called his a Thimble—(I think it sounds tame
To call Kisses Thimbles—but what’s in a Name!)

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1907, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Oliver Herford (1863–1935) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: THE PETER PAN ALPHABET

TEXT RESOURCE: Peter and Wendy

Sunday, December 04, 2011

Snow White with Dwarfs and Fairies

The Good Finger Fairies: One day Mama was very tired. She had been working hard all the week, so when Daddy went to work this morning she lay down on the sofa to take a little nap.

"I have so much work to do straightening up," she said. "I will rest a little bit and then I will get up and tidy things. I do hope you children will play quietly and will not disturb me."—A I.

Sue,/who was eight years old, Timmy, who was six, and Mary /jjane four, said "All right, Mama, we will play very quietly and we won't disturb you." So they all sat down on the floor, and as soon as Mama was asleep, Sue got out her book of fairy stories and began reading about little Snow White and the Seven Little Dwarfs.

"and so little Snow White lived happily ever

afterward," read Sue, "in the beautiful castle with Prince Charming, and all of the people loved Snow White very much, for she was as good as she was beautiful, and the little Gnomes came and lived at the Castle with Snow White and the Prince and they were all very happy."

"There!" said Sue, as she closed the book. "That was a nice story. I wish I were a Princess like Snow White!"

"I'd rather be Jack the Giant Killer!" said Timmy, "and rescue the Princesses from the Giant's castles! I'd have a fiery horse and a sword."

"Wish there were fairies now!" dreamed Sue aloud.

"So do I!" exclaimed Timmy.

Snow White with Dwarfs and Fairies

Little Mary Jane had been sitting there quietly while Sue read about Snow White and the Dwarfs, and now she sat twisting her chubby little fingers and wiggling her tiny little thumbs. There was sort of a puzzled look on her cunning little face, and she would look at the fingers of first one hand and then the other, not saying a word. But you could see she was thinking. Sue and Timmy watched her for a while wondering what she was doing.

Finally they said, "Mary Jane, what are you looking at your fingers like that for?"

"I was watching the fairies," Mary Jane said.

"Fairies! Why, there aren't any fairies—on your fingers!"

"Yes, there are!" Mary Jane replied. "I have been seeing them for the longest time. Just look!"

Snow White with Finger Fairies

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1907, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Johnny Gruelle (December 24, 1880 - January 9, 1938) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: My very own fairy stories Illustrated by: Johnny Gruelle (December 24, 1880 - January 9, 1938). Publisher: Published by P.F. Volland Company, 1917. Original from: the New York Public Library. Digitized: Jul 3, 2007. Length: 94 pages. Subjects: Children's stories, Fairy tales, Illustrated children's books.

Saturday, December 03, 2011

Captain Hook and Peter Pan

Yet Tiger Lily looked calm and impassive. She was the daughter of an Indian chief, too proud to offer a vain resistance, ready to die a fearless death, as befits the daughter of a chief.

Determined to save her, Peter thought of a clever trick. Imitating the wicked Captain's voice he called out: "Cut her bonds and let her go!"

"But, Captain —"

"At once, do you hear," cried Peter, "or I'll plunge my hook in you."

"Better do what the Captain orders," said Starkey nervously.

The effect was marvelous; the astonished buccaneers, fearing to disobey their Captain, released Tiger Lily, who leaped into the water and swam towards the Boys.

The Pirates had turned and were rowing back, when they saw Hook swimming towards them, and learned from him how they had been duped. Horribly enraged, he chased them out of the boat, leaving them to swim back to the ship as best they might, while he himself set about recapturing Tiger Lily.

But the Pirates once safely out of the way, Peter and his friends went back to the rock to attack the Captain, who was now single-handed. A fierce fight ensued, Hook using his iron prong to some purpose on poor Peter, while the Boys, seizing Hook's boat, rowed off with Tiger Lily in it. At last, finding himself outdone, the Captain gave up the fight, and in all haste swam back to his ship.

Peter, left alone on the rock with Wendy, found her so exhausted that she could neither swim nor fly any farther. A mermaid caught Wendy by the feet and began pulling her gently into the water. But Peter, feeling her slip, was just in time to draw her back. With difficulty he managed to help her to a firm footing, but the tide was rising, and they were both in great danger. As he watched the water silently creeping nearer, Peter almost despaired, for Hook had wounded him in the fight, and he could neither fly nor swim.

Captain Hook and Peter Pan

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1916, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Alice Bolingbroke Woodward, (1862–1951), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

PETER PAN THE BOY WHO WOULD NEVER GROW UP TO BE A MAN. RETOLD FROM SIR JAMES M BARRIE'S FAMOUS PLAY. EDITED AND ARRANGED BY: FREDERICK ORVILLE PERKINS EDITOR OF "THE BLUE BIRD," ETC. WITH SIXTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS BY: ALICE B. WOODWARD

TEXT CREDIT: Peter Pan: the boy who would never grow up to be a manAuthor: James Matthew Barrie. Editor: Frederick Orville Perkins. Publisher: Silver, Burdett & company, 1916. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Jul 17, 2008. Length: 79 pages. Subjects: Literary Criticism › Children's Literature, Children, Fairies, Literary Criticism / Children's Literature, Mermaids, Peter Pan (Fictitious character) Pirates, Social Science / Children's Studies.

Friday, December 02, 2011

Peter Pan and Captain Hook

Peter Pan and Captain Hook: Thus suddenly Hook found himself face to face with Peter. The others drew back and formed a ring round them.

For long the two enemies looked at one another; Hook shuddering slightly, and Peter with the strange smile upon his face.

'So, Pan,' said Hook at last, 'this is all your doing.'

'Ay, James Hook,' came the stern answer, 'it is all my doing.'

'Proud and insolent youth,' said Hook, 'prepare to meet thy doom.'

'Dark and sinister man,' Peter answered, 'have at thee.'

Without more words they fell to, and for a space there was no advantage to either blade. Peter was a superb swordsman, and parried with dazzling rapidity; ever and anon he followed up a feint with a lunge that got past his foe's defence, but his shorter reach stood him[Pg 227] in ill stead, and he could not drive the steel home. Hook, scarcely his inferior in brilliancy, but not quite so nimble in wrist play, forced him back by the weight of his onset, hoping suddenly to end all with a favourite thrust, taught him long ago by Barbecue at Rio; but to his astonishment he found this thrust turned aside again and again. Then he sought to close and give the quietus with his iron hook, which all this time had been pawing the air; but Peter doubled under it and, lunging fiercely, pierced him in the ribs. At sight of his own blood, whose peculiar colour, you remember, was offensive to him, the sword fell from Hook's hand, and he was at Peter's mercy.

'Now!' cried all the boys; but with a magnificent gesture Peter invited his opponent to pick up his sword. Hook did so instantly, but with a tragic feeling that Peter was showing good form.

Hitherto he had thought it was some fiend fighting him, but darker suspicions assailed him now.

'Pan, who and what art thou?' he cried huskily.

Peter Pan and Captain Hook

Title: Peter and Wendy. Author: James Matthew Barrie. Illustrator: Francis Donkin Bedford (1864–1954).

Author(s): J. M. Barrie. Illustrator: F. D. Bedford. Country: United Kingdom. Language: English. Genre(s): Fantasy. Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (UK), Charles Scribner's Sons (USA). Publication date: 11 October 1911 (UK) & (USA). Media type: Print. Pages: 267 pp.; Frontispiece and 11 half-tone plates

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1911, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Francis Donkin Bedford (1864–1954), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.