Showing posts with label Snakes and Reptiles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Snakes and Reptiles. Show all posts

Thursday, January 10, 2008

Red Eared Sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans)


Red Eared Sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans)High Resolution Image - File size: 186 KB. Format: JPEG Image (image/pjpeg) Dimensions: Screen: 1050px x 701px. Print: 7.00 x 4.67 inches. Resolution: 150 dpi (mid, presentation quality) Depth: Full Color.

Primary Metadata Title: Red-Eared Sliders. Alternative Title: (Trachemys scripta elegans) Creator: Stolz, Gary M. Source: WO8471-002
Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: Animals, Reptiles, Wildlife, turtles, turtle, wetland.

Red-eared slider From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Red-eared Slider (Trachemys scripta elegans) is a semi-aquatic turtle (terrapin) belonging to the family Emydidae. It is a native of the southern United States, but has become common in various areas of the world due to the pet trade. They are very popular pets in the United States, the Netherlands, Canada, and England.

Red-eared Sliders (RES) are members of the order Testudines, which contains nearly 250 species. In the United States and Canada, members of this genus are usually referred to as turtles. However, in the UK they are split into Turtles (aquatic), Tortoises (land), and Terrapins (semi-aquatic). All turtles and tortoises may also be referred to as "chelonians". RES were formerly classified as Chrysemys scripta elegans.

RES are native to the area around the Mississippi River down to the Gulf of Mexico. They thrive in warmer climates, particularly the Southeast quadrant of the United States. Such an area would be east of and below Colorado to Virginia down to Florida. They naturally reside in areas with calm, fresh, warm water sources. This includes ponds, lakes, marshes, creeks, and streams. They prefer quiet areas with a basking area, such a large flat rock or a floating log, in full sunlight. It is common for RES to bask together and even on top of each other. There is also abundant vegetation, which is the main component of an adult slider's diet. Wild RES will stay close to a water source unless they are in search of a new one. A female RES will also leave the water if she needs to nest and lay her eggs.

The pet trade has expanded their range around the world, often at the expense of native terrapins. Therefore, it is not difficult to locate RES in some suitable habitat anywhere in the world.

Pet RES should not be released into a wild habitat. These pets could carry organisms that the wild populations are not immune to and the pet may not have the proper immune system that is required to live in a wild habitat. Disease could easily be spread by this practice. Pet turtles fed commercial diets also may not recognize natural foods and may associate humans with food which could endanger the turtle. Pet owners should contact a rescue organization if they no longer want their turtle

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Red-eared slider

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Friday, January 04, 2008

Broad-banded Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus)

Broad-banded Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus)High Resolution Image - File size: 637 KB Format: JPEG Image (image/pjpeg) Dimensions: Screen: 2500px x 1666px. Print: 10.00 x 6.66 inches. Resolution: 250 dpi Depth: Full Color.

Primary Metadata Title: Broad-banded Copperhead. Alternative Title: (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus) Creator: Rauch, Ray. Source: WO-4397
Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: Subject: reptile, snake, copperhead, snakes, venomous, reptiles.

Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus is a venomous pitviper subspecies found in the southern United States, from Kansas, through Oklahoma and throughout central Texas.

This form is typically a light tan in color, with darker brown, wide crossbands - which gives it its common name. Their actual color varies by locality, varying from a red-brown, to a gray-brown. In the western reaches of its range, the species can be difficult to distinguish from the Trans-Pecos copperhead, A. c. pictigaster. The only notable physical difference between the subspecies is that the A. c. pictigaster tends to have an elaborately patterned underside, often being an irregular, white and

black pattern whereas A. c. laticinctus tends to be plain white, only have minimal patterning, or have elongated random blotching instead of a distinct pattern. The subspecies intergrade where their ranges overlap, further confusing identification. It also overlaps with the southern copperhead, A. c. contortrix in the eastern reaches of its range, making specimens there difficult to distinguish, but generally A. c. contortrix has banding that narrows at the spine, creating hourglass shapes, whereas A. c. laticinctus has bands that do not narrow at the spine.

They grow to approximately 20-36 inches in length. As juveniles, all species of Agkistrodon have a bright green-yellow color to their tail tip believed to be used as a lure to attract prey items to approach within striking range. The color fades to a grey or brown at about a year of age.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus

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Thursday, January 03, 2008

Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

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rimary Metadata Title: WO1373 Marine Iguanas. Alternative Title: (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)
Creator: Stolz, Gary M. Source: wO-Scenics-1373 Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildilfe Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: Ecuador, Lizard, Reptiles.

Marine Iguana From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) is an iguana that has the unique ability among modern lizards to live and forage in the sea. It is found only on the Galapagos Islands, but has spread to all the islands in the archipelago, and is sometimes called the Galapagos Marine Iguana. It mainly lives on the rocky Galapagos shore, but can also be spotted in marshes and mangrove beaches.

On his visit to the islands, Charles Darwin was revolted by the animals' appearance, writing:

The black Lava rocks on the beach are frequented by large (2-3 ft) most disgusting clumsy Lizards. They are as black as the porous rocks over which they crawl & seek their prey from the Sea. I call them 'imps of darkness'. They assuredly well become the land they inhabit.

In fact, Amblyrhynchus cristatus is not always black; the young have a lighter coloured dorsal stripe, and some adult specimens are grey. The reason for the sombre tones is that the species must rapidly absorb heat to minimize the period of lethargy after emerging from the water. They feed almost exclusively on marine algae, expelling the excess salt from nasal glands while basking in the sun, and the coating of salt can make their faces appear white. In adult males, coloration varies with the season. Breeding-season adult males on the southern islands are the most colorful and will acquire reddish and teal-green colors, while on Santa Cruz they are brick red and black, and on Fernandina they are brick red and dull greenish.

Another difference between the iguanas is size, which is different depending on the island the individual iguana inhabits. The iguanas living on the islands of Fernandina and Isabela (named for the famous rulers of Spain) are the largest found anywhere in the Galápagos. On the other end of the spectrum, the smallest iguanas are found on the

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Marine Iguana

President and Mrs. Bush Wish Americans, Troops Happy New Year and Short-horned Lizard (Phrynosoma douglassii) and 'the right glasses' for observing mystery behavior in electrons

Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Spinytail Iguana (Ctenosaura)

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Primary Metadata. Title: WOE117 Spinytail Iguana. Alternative Title: (Ctenosaura)
Creator: Varner, Sean. Source: WOE117-Electronic. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: Reptile, Mexico, Reptiles, Spinytail, Lizard, Iguanas, Iguana, WOE117, Sean Varner.

A large, robust lizard with a raised crest of scales down the back to the base of the tail. Small, smooth scales on body contrasting with large, rough, keeled spines ringing the tail. A lizard that prefers open sand or rocky areas with holes and crevices in which to hide. Feeds mostly on leaves and fruits but will also eat small animals.

Ctenosaura From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ctenosaura is a genus of lizard commonly known as spinytail iguanas within the large lizard family, Iguanidae and are native to Mexico and Central America. They range in size (total length, including the tail) from about 5 inches to well over one meter. The distinctive feature of this genus is the enlarged, spiny scales of the tail. Ctenousaurs are generally omnivorous, feeding on fruits, flowers, foliage, as well as on small animals. Some members of this genus are popular as pets. There are at least two species, Ctenosaura pectinata and Ctenosaura similis, introduced into the United States in south Texas, and Miami, Florida.

The world record sprint speed for lizards (21.5 miles/h or 34.6 km/h) was attained by the Costa Rican spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura similis).

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Ctenosaura

President and Mrs. Bush Wish Americans, Troops Happy New Year and Short-horned Lizard (Phrynosoma douglassii) and 'the right glasses' for observing mystery behavior in electrons

Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Short-horned Lizard (Phrynosoma douglassii)

Short-horned Lizard (Phrynosoma douglassii)High Resolution Image - File size: 260 KB. Format: JPEG Image (image/pjpeg) Dimensions: Screen: 1142px x 761px. Print: 7.61 x 5.07 inches. Resolution: 150 dpi (mid, presentation quality) Depth: Full Color.

Primary Metadata. Title: Short-horned Lizard. Alternative Title: (Phrynosoma douglassii)
Creator: Stolz, Gary M. Source: WO8215. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: New Mexico, Reptiles, Wildlife, lizard, reptile, short-horned lizard.

Short-horned Lizard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Short-horned Lizard is a small lizard that occurs in North America. Like other horned lizards, it is often wrongly called the "Horned Toad", but it is not a toad at all. It is a reptile, not an amphibian. It is one of five species of lizards in Canada.

Short-horned Lizards are flat-bodied, squat lizards with short spines crowning the head. They have a snub-nosed profile and short legs. The trunk is fringed by one row of pointed scales, while the belly scales are smooth. The color is gray, yellowish, or reddish-brown, and there are two rows of large dark spots on the back. When threatened or aggressive, their colors become more intense.

Females grow to larger sizes than males: females average some 7 cm (about 2.75 inches) from snout to vent (with a maximum total length of about 15 cm) and weigh about 18 g, whereas males have an SVL of only about 5 cm and weigh on the average about 10 g.

Short-horned Lizards are "sit-and-wait" predators. They feed primarily on ants, but will also take an occasional grasshopper or beetle. Often, they can be found sitting in the vicinity of ant nests or trails. They are most active during midday and burrow at night. They rely extensively on camouflage to avoid predators.

The mating season is in spring (May to June). They are viviparous: the female gives birth to 6 to 11 living offspring in late July or early August, which measure about 24 mm from snout to vent and weigh each about one gram. The young have no horns yet and are able to take care of themselves within a few hours.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Short-horned Lizard

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Friday, December 28, 2007

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)Western Diamondback Rattlesnake USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE) which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Crotalus atrox From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake, Texas diamond-back, Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Adults commonly grow to 120 cm in length. Specimens over 150 cm are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

The color pattern generally consists of a dusty looking gray-brown ground color, but it may also be pinkish brown, brick red, yellowish, pinkish or chalky white. This ground color is overlaid dorsally with a series of 24-25 dorsal body blotches that are dark gray-brown to brown in color. The first of these may be a pair of short stripes that extend backwards to eventually merge. Some of the first few blotches may be somewhat rectangular, but then become more hexagonal and eventually take on a distinctive diamond shape. The tail has 2-8 (usually 4-6) black bands separated by interspaces that are ash white or pale gray. There is a postocular stripe that is smoky gray or dark gray-brown and extends diagonally from the lower edge of the eye across the side of the head. This stripe is usually bordered below by a white stripe running from the upper preocular down to the supralabials just below and behind the eye

Found in the United States from central Arkansas and southeastern California, south into Mexico as far as northern Sinaloa, Hidalgo and northern Veracruz. Disjunct populations exist in southern Veracruz and southeastern Oaxaca. The type locality given is "Indianola" (Indianola, Calhoun County, Texas, USA).

In the United States it occurs in the following states: central and western Arkansas, Oklahoma excluding the northeast, north-central region and the panhandle, Texas excluding the northern panhandle and the east, southern and central New Mexico and Arizona, extreme southern Nevada, and in southeastern California on either side of the Chocolate Mountains. Records from extreme southern Kansas (Cowley and Sumner Counties) may be based on a natural occurrence of the species, while multiple records from near Kanopolis Reservoir in Ellsworth County seem to indicate a viable (although isolated) population.

In Mexico it occurs in the following states: Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, extreme northeastern Baja California (state), northern Sinaloa, northeastern Durango, Zacatecas, most of San Luis Potosí, northern Veracruz, Hidalgo and Querétaro. Specimens have been collected in the mountains, northwest of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca on numerous occasions, but have not been reported there since the 1940s.

This species has also been reported on a number of islands in the Gulf of California, including San Pedro Mártir, Santa María (Sinaloa), Tíburon and the Turner Islands.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Crotalus atrox

Benazir Bhutto Biography and Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Explosives at the microscopic scale produce shocking results VIDEO

Thursday, December 27, 2007

Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum)

Gila Monster USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE)
which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Gila Monster From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Gila Monster (pronounced /ˈhiːlə/, HEE-la), Heloderma suspectum, is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It is a heavy, slow moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2 feet) long, and is the most venomous lizard native to the USA. Its skin has the appearance of black, pink, orange, and yellow beads, laid down in intricate patterns. These beads are small bony plates that form scales, and are known as osteoderms. Until very recently, it was thought to be one of only two species of venomous lizard, the other being its close relative the Mexican beaded lizard. However research at the University of Melbourne, Australia and Pennsylvania State University has revealed that in fact many lizards in the iguanian and monitor families have venom-producing glands.

The name "Gila monster" refers to the Gila River Basin in Arizona. The generic name for Heloderma is from the Greek words Helos coming from the head of a nail or stud, and derma for skin, therefore Heloderma means studded skin. Suspectum comes from Cope's notion that the lizard might be venomous due to the grooves in the teeth.

Unlike snakes which use hollow upper teeth (fangs), the Gila monster injects venom into its victim through grooves in the teeth of its lower jaw. The teeth are loosely anchored, which allows them to be broken off and replaced throughout their lives. The Gila monster produces only small quantities of its neurotoxic venom, which is secreted into the lizard's saliva. By chewing its prey, however, it tries to put as much of the venom into the bloodstream of its victim as possible. The Gila monster's bite is normally not fatal to humans (there are no confirmed reports of fatalities), but it can bite quickly and holds on tenaciously. When Gila Monsters bite, they hold on tightly and chew. This helps them work their venom into the bite. Gila Monster bites are not deadly, but it is important to see a doctor if bitten.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Gila Monster

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Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)

Texas Horned LizardTexas Horned Lizard USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service
Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE) which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Texas horned lizard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) is one of 14 North American species of spikey-bodied reptiles called horned lizards. The Texas species ranges from Colorado and Kansas to northern Mexico, and from southeastern Arizona to Louisiana and Arkansas. Texas is the heart of its range. There are also isolated, introduced populations in the Carolinas, Georgia, and northern Florida.

The horned lizard is popularly called a "horned toad," "horny toad", or "horned frog," but it is neither a toad nor a frog. The popular names come from the lizard's rounded body and blunt snout, which give it a decidedly toad-like or frog-like appearance.(Phrynosoma literally means "toad-bodied." Cornutum means "horned.") The lizard's horns are extensions of its cranium and are composed of true bone.

The Texas horned lizard is the largest-bodied and most widely distributed of 8 species in the United States. It grows to a maximum length of 4-6 inches. Although its coloration generally serves as camouflage against predation, when threatened by a predator, a horned lizard puffs up its body to cause its spiny scales to protrude, making it difficult to swallow. The Texas horned lizard, along with at least three other species, also has the ability to squirt an aimed stream of blood from the corners of the eyes for a distance of up to 5 feet. This not only confuses would-be predators, the blood is mixed with a chemical that is foul-tasting to canidae predators such as wolves, coyotes, and domestic dogs.

About 70% of the Texas horned lizard's diet is made up of harvester ants, though they supplement these with termites, beetles, and grasshoppers. In recent years, the Texas horned lizard has declined in about 30% of its range, though there is some indication it may be making a comeback. The decline is usually blamed on overuse of pesticides and the spread of non-native, but highly aggressive and fiercely territorial, Brazilian fire ants. Both eradicate harvester ant colonies, destroying the horned lizard's principal source of food. The Texas horned lizard is now a protected species and it is illegal to take, possess, transport or sell them without a special permit.

Some Native American peoples regarded horned lizards as sacred. The animal is a common motif in the art of many Native Americans in the Southwestern U.S. and in Mexico.

The horned lizard is the state reptile of Texas and, as the "horned frog", is the mascot of Texas Christian University (TCU).

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Texas horned lizard

President Bush calls to members of the Armed Forces and Benjamin Franklin and Using carbon nanotubes to seek and destroy anthrax toxin and other harmful proteins VIDEO

Monday, December 24, 2007

Leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis)

Leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis)High Resolution Image File size: 195 KB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg). Dimensions: Screen: 1083px x 730px. Print: 7.22 x 4.87 inches. Resolution: 150 dpi (mid, presentation quality). Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Leopard tortoise. Alternative Title: (Geochelone pardalis). Creator: Stolz, Gary M.
Source: WO5628-007. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain). Subject: Animals, Kenya, Reptiles, Wildlife.

Leopard Tortoise From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Leopard tortoise(Geochelone pardalis) is a large and attractively marked tortoise which has a wide distribution in sub-Saharan Africa, including recorded localities in southern Sudan, Ethiopia, Eastern Africa (including Natal), Zambia, Botswana, Namibia, Angola and Southwest Africa. This chelonian is a large, grazing species of tortoise that favours semi-arid, thorny to grassland habitats.

It is, however, also found in some regions featuring a higher level of precipitation, although some leopard tortoises have been found in rainier areas. In both very hot and very cold weather they may dwell in abandoned fox, jackal, or anteater holes. Leopard Tortoises do not dig other than to make nests in which to lay eggs. Not surprisingly, given its propensity for grassland habitats it grazes, extensively upon mixed grasses.

It also favours the fruit and pads of the prickly pear cactus (Opuntia sp.), succulents and thistles. It grows to quite a respectable size, with adults reaching 16 - 18 inches (40 - 50 cm) and 40 pounds (18 Kg). Large examples may be 60 cm (over 2 feet) long and weigh about 80 lbs. They generally have a life span of 50 years.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Leopard Tortoise

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Saturday, December 22, 2007

Northern Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora aurora)

Northern Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora aurora)File size: 1.40 MB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg), Dimensions: Screen: 3593px x 2400px. Print: 11.98 x 8.00 inches. Resolution: 300 dpi (high, print quality) Depth: Full Color High Resolution Image

Primary Metadata: Title: Red legged frog. Alternative Title: (Rana aurora aurora)
Creator: Hayes, Marc P. Source: WO5410-26. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general). Subject: California.

Northern Red-legged Frog From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Northern Red-legged Frog, Rana aurora aurora, is a protected species of amphibian, whose range is the coastal region stretching from Northern California to southwest British Columbia. As a member of the genus Rana, this species is considered a true frog, with characteristic smooth skin and a narrow waist. This frog requires still waters for breeding and is rarely found at any great distance from its breeding ponds or marshes.

Rana aurora aurora adults may attain a length of eight centimeters; they have a dark facial mask and a characteristic light stripe along the jawline. The Northern Red-legged Frog has long, powerful legs well adapted to significant leaps; in fact its proximate species, R. draytonii, is considered to be that depicted by Mark Twain, in the famed tale of the Leaping Frog of Calaveras County. It is one of two amphibian species classified as Red-legged Frog, the other species being termed California Red-legged Frog; however, the latter species is found primarily from Marin County southerly to Baja California. These two genetically distinct species are believed to intergrade in the counties of Marin and Sonoma. In some systems of taxonomy, this species is classified as Rana aurora aurora.

The Northern Red-legged Frog is found in every coastal county of California from Mendocino County northward and including coastal Oregon. While it occurs primarily in the Northern California coastal mountain ranges, it is not found above an elevation of 1200 meters. It also occurs somewhat less commonly in the southern Cascade Range. The species is thought to intergrade with Rana draytonii in Marin County and Sonoma County, California, but has been observed as far south as San Mateo County.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Northern Red-legged Frog

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Thursday, December 20, 2007

Snakes and Reptiles

Snakes and ReptilesHigh Resolution Image File size: 917 KB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg). Dimensions: Screen: 1596px x 2108px. Print: 7.98 x 10.54 inches. Resolution: 200 dpi. Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Reptiles 28. Alternative Title: (none). Creator: Hines, Bob
Source: WO-ART-83-CDHines1. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general). Subject: rattlesnake den, diamondback rattlers, pygmy rattlesnake, worm snake, fox snake, garter snake, green turtle, snakes, line art, illustration, illustrations.
Reptile From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reptiles are air-breathing, cold-blooded vertebrates that have scaly bodies as opposed to hair or feathers; they represent an intermediate position in evolutionary development between amphibians and warm-blooded vertebrates, the birds and mammals. They are tetrapods and amniotes whose embryos are surrounded by an amniotic membrane, and members of the class Sauropsida inhabiting every continent with the exception of Antarctica.

The majority of reptile species are oviparous (egg-laying) although certain species of squamates are capable of giving live birth. This is achieved, either through ovoviviparity (egg retention), or viviparity (offspring born without use of calcified eggs). Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals with some providing initial care for their hatchlings.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Reptile

White House Press Briefing by Dana Perino 12/19/07 VIDEO PODCAST and Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and Tethered to chip, energy supply that drives sperm could power 'nanobot'

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)High Resolution Image File size: 1.48 MB. Format: JPEG image (image/jpeg) Dimensions: Screen: 3658px x 2400px. Print: 12.19 x 8.00 inches. Resolution: 300 dpi (high, print quality) Depth: Full Color

Primary Metadata. Title: Alligator. Alternative Title: (Alligator mississippiensis) Creator: Bailey, Dick
Source: WO2953Highlights. Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contributor DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH, Rights: (public domain) Audience: (general) Subject: reptile.

Alligator From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. The name alligator is an anglicized form of the Spanish el lagarto ("the lizard"), the name by which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the alligator. There are two living alligator species: the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese Alligator (Alligator sinensis).

Alligators are characterized by a wider snout than crocodiles. Both living species also tend to be darker in color, often nearly black but color is very dependent on the water. Algae-laden waters produce greener alligators; alligators from waters with a lot of tannic acid from overhanging trees are often darker (although the Chinese alligator has some light patterning.) Also, in alligators only the upper teeth can be seen with the jaws closed, in contrast to true crocodiles, in which upper and lower teeth can be seen. However, many individuals bear jaw deformities which complicate this means of identification.


The eyes of a large alligator will glow red and those of a smaller one will glow green when a light is shined on them. This fact can be used to find alligators in the dark.

An average American alligator's weight and length is 800 lbs (360 kg) and 13 feet (4 m) long. According to the Everglades National Park website, the largest alligator ever recorded in Florida was 17 feet 5 inches long (5.3 m). The largest alligator ever recorded in Alabama measured 12 feet 10 inches (3.7 m). The largest alligator ever recorded measured 19 feet 2 inches (5.8 m) and was found on Marsh Island, Louisiana. Few of the giant specimens were weighed, but the larger ones could have exceeded a ton in weight. The Chinese Alligator is smaller, rarely exceeding 7 feet (2 m) in length.

An alligator's lifespan is usually estimated in the range of 50 years or more. A specimen named Muja has resided in the Belgrade Zoo in Serbia since 1937, making it at least 70 years old. Another specimen, Čabulītis, in Riga Zoo, Latvia died in 2007 being more than 72 years old.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Alligator

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Friday, December 14, 2007

Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tenere)

Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tenere)Title: Coral Snake. Alternative Title: (Micrurus fulvius tenere) Creator: Goldman, Luther C. Source: WO-416 Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. High Resolution Image

Contributor: DIVISION OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. Language: EN - ENGLISH. Rights:(public domain). Audience: (general). Subject: reptile. snake. coral.
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Coral snake From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The coral snakes are a large group of elapid snakes that can be divided into two distinct groups, New World coral snakes and Old World coral snakes. There are three genera among New World coral snakes that consist of over 65 recognized species.

Coral snakes are most notable for their red, yellow/white, and black colored banding. Several nonvenomous species have similar coloration, however, including the Scarlet Kingsnake and the Milk Snake. In some regions, the order of the bands distinguishes between the non-venomous mimics and the venomous coral snakes, inspiring some folk rhymes — "Red and yellow, kill a fellow, red and black, venom lack". However, this only reliably applies to coral snakes in North America: Micrurus fulvius, Micrurus tener, and Micruroides euryxantus, found in the south and eastern United States. Coral snakes found in other parts of the world can have distinctly different patterns, and can even have red bands touching black bands, have only pink and blue banding, or have no banding at all.

Most species of coral snake are small in size. North American species average around 24" in length, but specimens of up to 60" or slightly larger have been reported. Aquatic species have flattened tails, to act as a fin, aiding in swimming.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Coral snake

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