Sunday, November 11, 2007

A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens



Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol with Numerous Original Illustrations by George T. Tobin. New York Frederick A. Stokes Company Publishers. Copyright 1899.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas was first published in 1843. The story met with instant success, selling six thousand copies within a week. Originally written as a potboiler to enable Dickens to pay off a debt, the tale has become one of the most popular and enduring Christmas stories of all time. — A Christmas Carol Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

MORE CHRISTMAS CAROL IMAGES A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim

A Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

A Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost

‘I wear the chain I forged in life,’ replied the Ghost. ‘I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. Is its pattern strange to you?’

Scrooge trembled more and more.

‘Or would you know,’ pursued the Ghost, ‘the weight and length of the strong coil you bear yourself? It was full as heavy and as long as this, seven Christmas Eves ago. You have laboured on it, since. It is a ponderous chain!’

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas Past.

It was a strange figure—like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium, which gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child’s proportions. Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful.

It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm.

A Christmas Carol The Ghost of Christmas Present.


A Christmas Carol The Ghost of Christmas Present

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

‘I am the Ghost of Christmas Present,’ said the Spirit. ‘Look upon me!’

Scrooge reverently did so. It was clothed in one simple green robe, or mantle, bordered with white fur. This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by any artifice. Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath, set here and there with shining icicles. Its dark brown curls were long and free; free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air.

Girded round its middle was an antique scabbard; but no sword was in it, and the ancient sheath was eaten up with rust.

A Christmas Carol Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim

‘And how did little Tim behave?’ asked Mrs. Cratchit, when she had rallied Bob on his credulity, and Bob had hugged his daughter to his heart’s content.

‘As good as gold,’ said Bob, ‘and better. Somehow he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember upon Christmas Day, who made lame beggars walk, and blind men see.’

Bob’s voice was tremulous when he told them this, and trembled more when he said that Tiny Tim was growing strong and hearty.

His active little crutch was heard upon the floor, and back came Tiny Tim before another word was spoken, escorted by his brother and sister to his stool before the fire; and while Bob, turning up his cuffs—as if, poor fellow, they were capable of being made more shabby—compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer; Master Peter, and the two ubiquitous young Cratchits went to fetch the goose, with which they soon returned in high procession.

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come

The Spirit stood among the graves, and pointed down to One. He advanced towards it trembling. The Phantom was exactly as it had been, but he dreaded that he saw new meaning in its solemn shape.

‘Before I draw nearer to that stone to which you point,’ said Scrooge, ‘answer me one question. Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only?’

Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood.

‘Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,’ said Scrooge. ‘But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. Say it is thus with what you show me!’

The Spirit was immovable as ever.

Ghost of Christmas Future Last of the Spirits

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge.

"Am I that man who lay upon the bed?" he cried, upon his knees.

The finger pointed from the grave to him, and back again.

"No, Spirit! Oh no, no!"

The finger still was there.

"Spirit!" he cried, tight clutching at its robe, "hear me! I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope?"

Fred Thompson TV Ad: Consistent Conservative and Thanksgiving Turkeys' morning exercise and ASU researchers give memory a boost

No comments:

Post a Comment