Showing posts with label A Christmas Carol. Show all posts
Showing posts with label A Christmas Carol. Show all posts

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come Christmas Carol Dickens

The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery.

It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. But for this it would have been difficult to detach its figure from the night, and separate it from the darkness by which it was surrounded.

He felt that it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread. He knew no more, for the Spirit neither spoke nor moved.

“I am in the presence of the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come?” said Scrooge.

The Spirit answered not, but pointed onward with its hand.

“You are about to show me shadows of the things that have not happened, but will happen in the time before us,” Scrooge pursued. “Is that so, Spirit?”

The upper portion of the garment was contracted for an instant in its folds, as if the Spirit had inclined its head. That was the only answer he received.

Although well used to ghostly company by this time, Scrooge feared the silent shape so much that his legs trembled beneath him, and he found that he could hardly stand when he prepared to follow it. The Spirit paused a moment, as observing his condition, and giving him time to recover.

Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come Christmas Carol Dickens

But Scrooge was all the worse for this. It thrilled him with a vague uncertain horror, to know that behind the dusky shroud, there were ghostly eyes intently fixed upon him, while he, though he stretched his own to the utmost, could see nothing but a spectral hand and one great heap of black.

“Ghost of the Future!” he exclaimed, “I fear you more than any spectre I have seen. But as I know your purpose is to do me good, and as I hope to live to be another man from what I was, I am prepared to bear you company, and do it with a thankful heart. Will you not speak to me?”

It gave him no reply. The hand was pointed straight before them.

“Lead on!” said Scrooge. “Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!”

The Phantom moved away as it had come towards him. Scrooge followed in the shadow of its dress, which bore him up, he thought, and carried him along.

Title: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator and Frederick Barnard (1846 London - September 1896).

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924, in this case 1845, are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case John Leech 29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: A CHRISTMAS CAROL IN PROSE BEING A Ghost Story of Christmas BY CHARLES DICKENS WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN LEECH

Friday, November 12, 2010

A Christmas Carol

A Christmas CarolTitle: The Works Progress Administration in Ohio presents the Federal Theatre for youth in "A Christmas Carol"

Date Created/Published: [Ohio] : Federal Art Project, [between 1936 and 1941] Medium: 1 print on board (poster) : silkscreen, color. Summary: Poster for Federal Theatre Project presentation of "A Christmas Carol." Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-3737 (color film copy slide)


Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: POS - WPA - OH .01 .C57, no. 1 (A size) [P&P] [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes:

* Work Projects Administration Poster Collection (Library of Congress).

Format:

* Screen prints--Color--1930-1950.
* Theatrical posters--1930-1950.

Collections:

* Posters: WPA Posters

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

A Christmas Carol Gob Cratchit and Tiny Tim

A Christmas Carol Gob Cratchit and Tiny TimA Christmas Carol Gob Cratchit and Tiny Tim.

'And how did little Tim behave?' asked Mrs. Cratchit when she had rallied Bob on his credulity, and Bob had hugged his daughter to his heart's content.

' As good as gold,' said Bob, ' and better. Somehow, he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember upon Christmas Day who made lame beggars walk and blind men see.'


Bob's voice was tremulous when he told them this, and trembled more when he said that Tiny Tim was growing strong and hearty.

His active little crutch was heard upon the floor, and back came Tiny Tim before another word was spoken, escorted by his brother and sister to his stool beside the fire; and while Bob, turning up his cuffs—as if, poor fellow, they were capable .of being made more shabby — compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round, and put it on the hob to simmer, Master Peter and the two ubiquitous young Cratchits went to fetch the goose, with which they soon returned in high procession.

Such a bustle ensued that you might have thought a goose the rarest of all birds; a feather phenomenon, to which a black swan was a matter of course and, in truth, it was something very like it in that house. Mrs. Cratchit made the gravy (ready beforehand in a little saucepan) hissing hot; Master Peter mashed the potatoes with incredible vigour; Miss Belinda sweetened up the apple sauce; Martha dusted the hot plates; Bob took Tiny Tim beside him in a tiny corner at the table, the two young Cratchits set chairs for everybody, not forgetting themselves, and, mounting guard upon their posts, crammed spoons into their mouths, lest they should shriek for goose before their turn came to be helped.

At last the dishes were set on, and grace was said. It was succeeded by a breathless pause, as Mrs. Cratchit, looking slowly all along the carving-knife, prepared to plunge it in the breast; but when she did, and when the long-expected gush of stuffing issued forth, one murmur of delight arose all round the board, and even Tiny Tim, excited by the two young Cratchits, beat on the table with the handle of his knife and feebly cried Hurrah!

Title: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator and Frederick Barnard (1846 London - September 1896).

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case John Leech 29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864) and Frederick Barnard 1846 London - September 1896, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Saturday, December 05, 2009

A Christmas Carol 'Old Fezziwig'

A Christmas Carol 'Old Fezziwig'There were more dances, and there were forfeits, and more dances, and there was cake, and there was negus, and there was a great piece of Cold Roast, and there was a great piece of Cold Boiled, and there were mince-pies, and plenty of beer. But the great effect of the evening came after the Roast and Boiled, when the fiddler (an artful dog, mind!
The sort of man who knew his business better than you or I could have told it him!) struck up ' Sir Roger de Coverley.' Then old Fezziwig stood out to dance with Mrs. Fezziwig. Top couple, too ; with a good stiff piece of work cut out for them ; three or four and twenty pair of partners; people who were not to be trifled with; people who would dance, and had no notion of walking.

But if they had been twice as many—ah ! four times—old Fezziwig would have been a match for them, and so would Mrs. Fezziwig. As to her, she was worthy to be his partner in every sense of the term. If that's not high praise, tell me higher, and I '11 use it. A positive light appeared to issue from Fezziwig's calves. They shone in every part of the dance like moons. You couldn't have predicted, at any given time, what would become of them next. And when old Fezziwig and Mrs. Fezziwig had gone all through the dance; advance and retire, both hands to your partner, bow and curtsy, cork-screw, thread-the-needle, and back again to your place ; Fezziwig ' cut'—cut so deftly, that he appeared to wink with his legs, and came upon his feet again without a stagger.

When the clock struck eleven, this domestic ball broke up. Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig took their stations, one on either side the door, and, shaking hands with every person individually as he or she went out, wished him or her a Merry Christmas. When everybody had retired but the two 'prentices, they did the same to them ; and thus the cheerful voices died away, and the lads were left to their beds; which were under a counter in the backshop.

Title: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924 are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case John Leech 29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Thursday, December 03, 2009

A Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost

A Christmas Carol Marley's GhostA Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost. " Man of the worldly mind !" replied the Ghost, " do you believe in me or not ?"

" I do," said Scrooge. " I must. But why do spirits walk the earth, and why do they come to me ?"

" It is required of every man," the Ghost returned, "that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death.
It is doomed to wander through the world—oh, woe is me !—and witness what it cannot share, but might have shared on earth, and turned to happiness!"

Again the spectre raised a cry, and shook its chain, and wrung its shadowy hands.

" You are fettered," said Scrooge, trembling. " Tell me why V

'' I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. " I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. Is its pattern strange to you f"

Scrooge trembled more and more.

" Or would you know," pursued the Ghost, " the weight and length of the strong coil you bear yourself ? It was full as heavy and as long as this, seven Christmas Eves ago. You have laboured on it, since. It is a ponderous chain !"

Scrooge glanced about him on the floor, in the expectation of finding himself surrounded by some fifty or sixty fathoms of iron cable : but he could see nothing.

" Jacob," he said, imploringly. " Old Jacob Marley, tell me more. Speak comfort to me, Jacob."

" I have none to give," -the Ghost replied. " It comes from other regions, Ebenczer Scrooge, and is conveyed by other ministers, to other kinds of men. Nor can I tell you what I would. A very little more, is all permitted to mc. I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere. My spirit never walked beyond our counting-house—mark me!—in life my spirit never roved beyond the narrow limits of our money-changing hole and weary journeys lie before me!"

Title: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924 are now in the public domain.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas Present

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas PresentTitle: A Christmas carol in prose: being a ghost story of Christmas. Author: Charles Dickens. Publisher: Little, Brown, 1920. Original from: the University of Virginia. Digitized: Jul 7, 2009. Length: 166 pages, Art by: John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1924 are now in the public domain.
This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case John Leech 29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

"I am the Ghost of Christmas Present," said the Spirit. " Look upon me!"

Scrooge reverently did so. It was clothed in one simple deep green robe, or mantle, bordered with white fur. This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by any artifice. Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath set here and there with shining icicles. Its dark brown curls were long and free: free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air. Girded round its middle was an antique scabbard; but no sword was in it, and the ancient sheath was eaten up with rust.

" You have never seen the like of me before!" exclaimed the Spirit.

" Never," Scrooge made answer to it.

" Have never walked forth with the younger members of my family; meaning (for I am vt^y young) my elder brothers born in these later years ?" pursued the Phantom.

" I don't think I have," said Scrooge. " X am afraid I have not. Have you had many brothers, Spirit?"

'' More than eighteen hundred," said the Ghost.

" A tremendous family to provide for!" muttered Scrooge.

Sunday, November 11, 2007

A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens



Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol with Numerous Original Illustrations by George T. Tobin. New York Frederick A. Stokes Company Publishers. Copyright 1899.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas was first published in 1843. The story met with instant success, selling six thousand copies within a week. Originally written as a potboiler to enable Dickens to pay off a debt, the tale has become one of the most popular and enduring Christmas stories of all time. — A Christmas Carol Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

MORE CHRISTMAS CAROL IMAGES A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim

A Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

A Christmas Carol Marley's Ghost

‘I wear the chain I forged in life,’ replied the Ghost. ‘I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. Is its pattern strange to you?’

Scrooge trembled more and more.

‘Or would you know,’ pursued the Ghost, ‘the weight and length of the strong coil you bear yourself? It was full as heavy and as long as this, seven Christmas Eves ago. You have laboured on it, since. It is a ponderous chain!’

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas Past.

It was a strange figure—like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium, which gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child’s proportions. Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful.

It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm.

A Christmas Carol The Ghost of Christmas Present.


A Christmas Carol The Ghost of Christmas Present

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

‘I am the Ghost of Christmas Present,’ said the Spirit. ‘Look upon me!’

Scrooge reverently did so. It was clothed in one simple green robe, or mantle, bordered with white fur. This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by any artifice. Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath, set here and there with shining icicles. Its dark brown curls were long and free; free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air.

Girded round its middle was an antique scabbard; but no sword was in it, and the ancient sheath was eaten up with rust.

A Christmas Carol Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim

‘And how did little Tim behave?’ asked Mrs. Cratchit, when she had rallied Bob on his credulity, and Bob had hugged his daughter to his heart’s content.

‘As good as gold,’ said Bob, ‘and better. Somehow he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember upon Christmas Day, who made lame beggars walk, and blind men see.’

Bob’s voice was tremulous when he told them this, and trembled more when he said that Tiny Tim was growing strong and hearty.

His active little crutch was heard upon the floor, and back came Tiny Tim before another word was spoken, escorted by his brother and sister to his stool before the fire; and while Bob, turning up his cuffs—as if, poor fellow, they were capable of being made more shabby—compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer; Master Peter, and the two ubiquitous young Cratchits went to fetch the goose, with which they soon returned in high procession.

A Christmas Carol the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come

The Spirit stood among the graves, and pointed down to One. He advanced towards it trembling. The Phantom was exactly as it had been, but he dreaded that he saw new meaning in its solemn shape.

‘Before I draw nearer to that stone to which you point,’ said Scrooge, ‘answer me one question. Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only?’

Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood.

‘Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,’ said Scrooge. ‘But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. Say it is thus with what you show me!’

The Spirit was immovable as ever.

Ghost of Christmas Future Last of the Spirits

Above image. Illustrator: John Leech This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less in this case John Leech August 29, 1817 – October 29, 1864. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge.

"Am I that man who lay upon the bed?" he cried, upon his knees.

The finger pointed from the grave to him, and back again.

"No, Spirit! Oh no, no!"

The finger still was there.

"Spirit!" he cried, tight clutching at its robe, "hear me! I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope?"

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