Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Haile Selassie I

Haile Selassie I (July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975)

Title: H.S. [i.e., Haile Selassie] in robe. Creator(s): American Colony (Jerusalem). Photo Dept., photographer. Date Created / Published: [1923?]. Medium: 1 negative : glass, dry plate ; 4 x 5 in. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-matpc-10374 (digital file from original photo)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. Photographs in the G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection are in the public domain. By American Colony (Jerusalem). Photo Dept., photographer. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection is a rich source of historical images of the Middle East. The majority of the images depict Palestine (present day Israel and the West Bank) from 1898 to 1946. Most of the collection consists of over 22,000 glass and film photographic negatives and transparencies created by the American Colony Photo Department and its successor firm, the Matson Photo Service. Over 1,000 photographic prints and eleven albums are also part of this collection.

Digital images for the negatives and transparencies and a sample of the photographs are available online.

Haile Selassie ICall Number: LC-M32- 52465-x [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Notes: Creator name based on date. Title from negative sleeve. Guide card: Balfour visit. On guide card: 1921. Gift; Episcopal Home; 1978.

Format: Dry plate negatives. Collections: Matson (G. Eric and Edith) Photograph Collection. Part of: G. Eric and Edith Matson Photograph Collection.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

2d Massachusetts Infantry on the grounds of Atlanta, Ga. City Hall

2d Massachusetts Infantry on the grounds of Atlanta, Ga. City Hall

IMAGE CREDIT: Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Hello Public Domain Clip Art Subscribers sookietex here. As twitter's @sookietex, please follow. i'm taking part in a promotion by Klout.com, [great service] and the new TNT show "Falling Skies" [great show]. i was chosen, along with other tweeters, to receive swag, an ‘Alien Invasion Survival Kit’ and to be part of the Show's Army of Influence.

The goal for our Army of Tweeters is to inspire interest and watchers for Falling Skies using Social Media. Participants are listed on the "Army of Influence Leaderboard" and whomever is at the top of board at the end of the promotion wins a walk-on role in a upcoming episode of Falling Skies.

Now Gentle Readers here’s what I would like YOU TO DO:

During the promotion, i’ll be tweeting A LOT about alien invasion, Falling Skies and the Human resistance movement known as the 2nd Mass [because of their location in Boston, Mass.] using the #fsincentivized hashtag. Please Retweet [RT] those tweets. Or if that's not your thing, please tweet this for me:

I want @Sookietex to win a walk-on role in the new TNT show #FallingSkies #fsincentivized

Just click the above link and hit ‘Tweet’!

Thank You.

Monday, June 27, 2011

1953 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible

Description: 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Date: September 1977. Source. Chevrolet promo photo scan. Author: Chevrolet. By Chevrolet (Chevrolet promo photo scan) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

On June 28, 1953, workers at a Chevrolet plant in Flint, Michigan, assembled the first Corvette. The first completed production car rolled off the assembly line two days later, The cars were hand-built and techniques evolved during the production cycle, so that each 1953 Corvette is slightly different. All 1953 models had Polo White exteriors, red interiors, and black canvas soft tops. Over two-hundred 1953 Corvettes are known to exist today.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published in the United States between 1923 and 1977, inclusive, without a copyright notice. Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States.

However this inage may not be in the public domain in countries that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works such as Canada (50 post mortem auctoris), Mainland China (50 pma, not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany (70 p.m.a.), Mexico (100 p.m.a.), Switzerland (70 p.m.a.), and other countries with individual treaties. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law. and in PDF FORMAT

1953 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible

TEXT RESOURCE: Chevrolet Corvette (C1)

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Scanning Electron Micrograph of a Flea

Description: Scanning Electron Micrograph of a Flea. See PHIL 11436 for a colorized version of this image. Fleas are known to carry a number of diseases that are transferable to human beings through their bites. Included in this infections is the plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

Fleas, like other holometabolous insects, have a four-part life cycle consisting of eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults. Eggs are shed by the female in the enviroment . Eggs hatch into larvae in about 3-4 days and feed on organic debris in the environment. The number of larval instars varies among the species. Larvae eventually form pupae , which are in cocoons that are often covered with debris from the environment (sand, pebbles, etc). The larval and pupal stages take about 3-4 weeks to complete. Afterwards, adults hatch from pupae and seek out a warm-blooded host for blood meals.

The primary hosts for Ctenocephalides felis and C. canis are cats and dogs, respectively, although other mammals, including humans, may be fed upon. The primary hosts for Xenopsylla cheopis are rodents, especially rats. In North America, plague (Yersinia pestis) is cycled between X. cheopis and prairie dogs. Humans are the primary host for Pulex irritans.

Scanning Electron Micrograph of a FleaContent Providers(s): CDC Creation Date: Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr. By CDC/Janice Haney Carr [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

This image or file is a work of an employee of the United States Federal Government (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

TEXT CREDIT: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Saturday, June 25, 2011

F6F Hellcat fighter

In 1942, Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation began mass production of the F6F "Hellcat" fighter as replacement for the F4F. Grumman installed the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp 2,000 hp (1,500 kW) estimating a 25% increase in performance would result. The first Cyclone-equipped prototype (02981) flew on 26 June 1942 while the first Double Wasp-equipped aircraft, the XF6F-3 (02982) had its first flight on 30 July 1942.

Credits - U.S. Navy Photo. U.S. Centennial of Flight

This image or file is a work of an employee of the United States Federal Government, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Grumman F6F-3 Hellcats in tricolor camouflage, sea blue, intermediate blue and insignia white.

F6F Hellcat fighter

Friday, June 24, 2011

Battle of the Little Bighorn Custer's Last Stand, the Battle of the Greasy Grass

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, Custer's Last Stand, the Battle of the Greasy Grass occurred on June 25 and June 26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in eastern Montana Territory, near what is now Crow Agency, Montana. The engagement was between forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho people against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army.

Title: The Custer fight / C.M. Russell 1903. Creator(s): Russell, Charles M. (Charles Marion), 1864-1926, artist. Date Created / Published: 1903, c1905. Medium: 1 photomechanical print.

Summary: The Battle of the Little Bighorn, showing Native Americans on horseback in foreground.

Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7160 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZCN4-268 (color film copy neg.) Call Number: ART REPRO - Russell [item] [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes: G9196 U.S. Copyright Office. Reproduction of painting. Copyright deposit print.

Subjects: Custer, George A.--(George Armstrong),--1839-1876. Little Bighorn, Battle of the, Mont., 1876. Indians of North America--War--1870-1880. Campaigns & battles--1870-1880.

Format: Art reproductions--1900-1910. Photomechanical prints--1900-1910.

Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

Battle of the Little Bighorn Custer's Last Stand, the Battle of the Greasy GrassThis image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, in this case c1905, are now in the public domain.

This image is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Charles Marion Russell (March 19, 1864 – October 24, 1926) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year.

TEXT RESOURCE: Battle of the Little Bighorn From Wikipedia

Thursday, June 23, 2011

UFO Roswell Report



Roswell Report: Case Closed, Executive Summary

In July 1994, the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force concluded an exhaustive search for records in response to a General Accounting Office (GAO) inquiry of an event popularly known as the "Roswell Incident." The focus of the GAO probe, initiated at the request of a member of Congress, was to determine if the U.S. Air Force, or any other U.S. government agency, possessed information on the alleged crash and recovery of an extraterrestrial vehicle and its alien occupants near Roswell, N.M. in July 1947.

The 1994 Air Force report concluded that the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Army Air Forces, recovered debris from an Army Air Forces balloon-borne research project code named MOGUL. Records located describing research carried out under the MOGUL project, most of which were never classified (and publicly available) were collected, provided to GAO, and published in one volume for ease of access for the general public.

This report discusses the results of this exhaustive research and identifies the likely sources of the claims of "alien bodies" at Roswell. Contrary to allegations, many of the accounts appear to be descriptions of unclassified and widely publicized Air Force scientific achievements. Other descriptions of "bodies" appear to be actual incidents in which Air Force members were killed or injured in the line of duty.

UFO Roswell Report clip artProduced by the Air Force Web Information Service - June 24, 1997.

Overview: AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on AF.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image or file is a work of an employee of the United States Federal Government, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Adolf Hitler in Paris, 06/23/1940

Adolf Hitler in Paris, 06/23/1940. ARC Identifier 540179 / Local Identifier 242-HLB-5073-20. Item from Record Group 242: National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized, 1675 - 1958.

Creator(s): General Services Administration. National Archives and Records Service. Office of the National Archives. (ca. 1949 - 1985) Type(s) of Archival Materials: Photographs and other Graphic Materials

Contact(s): Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. PHONE: 301-837-0561; FAX: 301-837-3621; EMAIL: stillpixorder@nara.gov.

Production Date(s): 06/23/1940. Part Of: Series: Hoffmann. Collection; Subseries HLB; 35mm prints and negatives made by the Berlin Office, compiled 03/1933 - 07/1944.

Access Restriction(s): Unrestricted. Use Restriction(s): Unrestricted.

This image from the US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) was originally copyrighted by the Presse Illustrationen Hoffmann (Heinrich Hoffmann, Berlin SW68 Kochstrasse 10) and was seized by the US government after World War II and vested by the United States Attorney General as US government property in 1951. It is considered public domain because it was not divested to the original copyright owner and because of the ruling in Price v. United States: United States Court of Appeals, Fifth circuit, 20 November, 1995[1] which confirmed that under US law Heinrich Hoffman items in the National Archives are not copyrighted by the original copyright owners in the US. Part of the ruling reads "The United States may dispose of items that were seized during the allied occupation of Germany as it sees fit; indeed, it has done so."

It states on [2] that

"Scholars fearful that a major source of visual material in the public domain was suddenly liable for ruinous permission fees can now breathe a sigh of relief. But one is well-served to look carefully at both Judge Hughes's initial judgment in favor of Price as well as Judge Jolly's judgment of dismissal, as both contain many illuminating details. It now seems clear that all of Heinrich Hoffmann's photographs at National Archives may be considered as being in the public domain, which means they may be used in scholarly and popular books, articles, films and television programmes without payment of permission fees to German heirs or to Billy Price"

Note this does not apply to Heinrich Hoffmann items not in the US national archives, it must say the item is 'Use Restrictions: unrestricted', always list the source of the image.

Variant Control Number(s): NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-242-HLB-5073-20 Select List Identifier: WWII #82

Index Terms: Subjects Represented in the Archival Material: World War, 1939-1945

TEXT RESOURCE: Adolf Hitler From Wikipedia

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Coyote (Canis latrans) in Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone's coyotes (Canis latrans) are among the largest coyotes in the United States; adults average about 30 lbs. and some weigh around 40 lbs. This canid (member of the dog family) stands less than two feet tall and varies in color from gray to tan with sometimes a reddish tint to its coat. Coyotes live an average of about 6 years, although one Yellowstone coyote lived to be more than 13 before she was killed and eaten by a cougar.

A coyote’s ears and nose appear long and pointed, especially in relation to the size of its head. It can generally be distinguished from its much larger relative, the gray wolf, by its overall slight appearance compared to the massive 75 to 125-pound stockiness of the bigger dog. The coyote is a common predator in the park, often seen alone or in packs, traveling through the park's wide open valleys hunting small mammals. But they are widely distributed and their sign can also be found in the forests and thermal areas throughout Yellowstone. They are capable of killing large prey, especially when they cooperatively hunt.

Coyote ( Canis latrans ) in Yellowstone National Park Photo courtesy of Kim Keating, USGS

Copyrights and Credits: USGS authored or produced data and information are considered to be in the U.S. public domain. While the content of most USGS Web pages is in the U.S. public domain.

Coyote (Canis latrans) in Yellowstone National ParkThis image or file is a work of an employee of the United States Federal Government, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

When using information from USGS information products, publications, or Web sites, we ask that proper credit be given. Credit can be provided by including a citation such as the following:

Credit: U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior / USGS. U.S. Geological Survey/photo by Jane Doe (if the photographer / artist is known)

TEXT CREDIT: Yellowstone National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Monday, June 20, 2011

Doug Fairbanks & Mary Pickford

On June 21, 1920, Doug Fairbanks & Mary Pickford are mobbed by crowds while on their honeymoon in London fans riot.

Title: Doug Fairbanks & Mary Pickford Creator(s): Bain News Service, publisher. Date Created / Published: [no date recorded on caption card] Medium: 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ggbain-30610 (digital file from original negative)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. There are no known restrictions on the photographs in the George Grantham Bain Collection. Publication and other forms of distribution: No known restrictions.

The George Grantham Bain Collection represents the photographic files of one of America's earliest news picture agencies. The collection richly documents sports events, theater, celebrities, crime, strikes, disasters, political activities including the woman suffrage campaign, conventions and public celebrations. The photographs Bain produced and gathered for distribution through his news service were worldwide in their coverage, but there was a special emphasis on life in New York City. The bulk of the collection dates from the 1900s to the mid-1920s, but scattered images can be found as early as the 1860s and as late as the 1930s.

Doug Fairbanks & Mary PickfordAvailable online are 39,744 glass negatives and a selection of about 1,600 photographic prints for which copy negatives exist. This represents all of the glass plate negatives the Library holds and a small proportion of the 50,000 photographic prints in the collection. The Library purchased the collection in 1948 from D.J. Culver. (Bain also deposited photographs for copyright during his career; photographs clearly acquired by the Library of Congress through copyright deposit are generally considered outside the scope of the George Grantham Bain Collection.)

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division,

Call Number: LC-B2- 5213-12 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). General information about the Bain Collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Format: Glass negatives.

Collections: Bain Collection

Sunday, June 19, 2011

the Great Seal of the United States

June 20, 1782, Congress adopts the Great Seal of the United States

Symbolically, the seal reflects the beliefs and values that the Founding Fathers attached to the new nation and wished to pass on to their descendants. The report which Thomson submitted to the Congress explained the obverse this way: The red and white stripes of the shield “represent the several states... supporting a [blue] Chief which unites the whole and represents Congress.” The colors are adopted from the American flag: “White signifies purity and innocence, Red, hardiness & valour, and Blue, the colour of the Chief, signifies vigilance, perseverance & justice.”

The shield, or escutcheon, is “born on the breast of an American Eagle without any other supporters to denote that the United States of America ought to rely on their own Virtue.” The number 13, denoting the 13 original States, is represented in the bundle of arrows, the stripes of the shield, and the stars of the constellation. The olive branch and the arrows “denote the power of peace & war.” The constellation of stars symbolizes a new nation taking its place among other sovereign states. The motto E Pluribus Unum, emblazoned across the scroll and clenched in the eagle’s beak, expresses the union of the 13 States.

the Great Seal of the United States

the Great Seal of the United States
Recent scholarship has pointed out the probable source of this motto: Gentlemen’s Magazine, published in London from 1732 to 1922, was widely read by the educated in the American Colonies. Its title page carried that same motto and it is quite possible that it influenced the creators of the seal. The reverse, sometimes referred to as the spiritual side of the seal, contains the 13-step pyramid with the year 1776 in Roman numerals on the base. At the summit of the pyramid is the Eye of Providence in a triangle surrounded by a Glory (rays of light) and above it appears the motto Annuit Coeptis. Along the lower circumference of the design appear the words Novus Ordo Seclorum, heralding the beginning of the new American era in 1776.

This image or file is a work of an employee of the United States Federal Government, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

By U.S. Government [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

18 U.S.C. § 713 states that nobody can knowingly display any printed or other likeness of the Great Seal of the United States, or any facsimile thereof, in, or in connection with, any advertisement, poster, circular, book, pamphlet, or other publication, public meeting, play, motion picture, telecast, or other production, or on any building, monument, or stationery, for the purpose of conveying, or in a manner reasonably calculated to convey, a false impression of sponsorship or approval by the Government of the United States or by any department, agency, or instrumentality thereof.

TEXT CREDIT: The Great Seal of the United States

Saturday, June 18, 2011

Summer Solstice Celebrated



Summer Solstice Celebrated, The Cassini Mission celebrates Earth's summer solstice (for the Northern hemisphere).

The summer solstice occurs at the moment the earth's tilt toward from the sun is at a maximum. Therefore, on the day of the summer solstice, the sun appears at its highest elevation with a noontime position that changes very little for several days before and after the summer solstice. In fact, the word solstice comes from Latin solstitium or sol (the sun) + -stit-, -stes (standing). The summer solstice occurs when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer, which is located at 23.5° latitude North, and runs through Mexico, the Bahamas, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and southern China. The sun will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 1116 am MDT on June 21, 2011. For every place north of the Tropic of Cancer, the sun is at its highest point in the sky and this is the longest day of the year.

There are two times of the year when the Earth's axis is tilted neither toward nor away from the sun, resulting in an equal amount of daylight and darkness at all latitudes. These events are referred to as equinoxes and occur near March 21 (Vernal Equinox) and near September 21 (Autumnal Equinox). At the equator, the sun is directly overhead at noon on the two equinoxes. The Vernal Equinox occurred at 521 pm MDT on March 21, 2011. The Autumnal Equinox will occur at 304 am MDT on September 2, 2011.

Summer Solstice CelebratedJPL Image Use Policy, Unless otherwise noted, images and video on JPL public web sites (public sites ending with a jpl.nasa.gov address) may be used for any purpose without prior permission, Unless otherwise noted in the caption information for an image, the credit line should be "Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

NASA still images, audio files and video generally are not copyrighted.

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services. If a NASA image includes an identifiable person, using the image for commercial purposes may infringe that person's right of privacy or publicity.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

TEXT CREDIT: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Battle of Bunker Hill

The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775, mostly on and around Breed's Hill, about two o'clock in the afternoon intense anxiety prevailed at the intrenchments on Breed's Hill.

The patriot band who raised them had witnessed the brilliant landing of the British veterans, and the return of the barges to Boston. They saw troops again filling the boats, and felt, not without apprehension, that a battle was inevitable. They knew the contest would be an unequal one, — that of raw militia against the far-famed regulars, — and they grew impatient for the promised re-enforcements. But no signs appeared that additional troops were on the way to support them. Teams were impressed to carry on provisions; barrels of beer arrived; but the supply of refreshments that reached them was so scanty, that it served only to tantalize their wants.

It is not strange, therefore, the idea was entertained that they had been rashly, if not treacherously, led into perilous position, and that they were to be left to their own resources for their defence. "The danger," Peter Brown wrote, " we were in made us think there was treachery, and that we were brought here to be all slain. And I must and will venture to say there was treachery, oversight, or presumption in the conduct of our officers."

This idea, however, must have been dispelled, as characters who had long been identified with the patriot cause, who were widely known and widely beloved, appeared on the field to share their perils, and assured them that aid was at hand.

Battle of Bunker HillThis image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, in this case c1909, are now in the public domain.

These images are also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Edward Percy Moran ("Percy") (1862 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – 1935 in New York City), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year.

General Pomeroy, a veteran of the French wars, as brave as he was patriotic, asked of Ward a horse to take him to the field; and one was supplied. On his arrival at the Neck, he declined to expose the horse to the severe fire that raked it, and coolly walked across. He joined the force, gun in hand, at the rail-fence, and was welcomed by cheers.

The defences of the Americans, at three in the afternoon, were still in a rude, unfinished state. The redoubt on the spot where the monument stands was about eight rods square. Its strongest side, the front, facing the settled part of the town, was made with projecting angles, and protected the south side of the hill. The eastern side commanded an extensive field. The north side had an open passage-way. A breastwork, beginning a short distance from the redoubt, and on a line with its eastern side, extended about one hundred yards north towards a slough. A sally-port, between the south end of the breastwork and the redoubt, was protected by a blind.

These works were raised about six feet from the level of the ground, and had platforms of wood, or steps made of earth, for the men to stand on when they should fire. The rail-fence has been already described. Its south corner was about two hundred yards, on a diagonal line, in the rear of the north corner of the breastwork. This line was slightly protected; a part of it, however, — about one hundred yards, — between the slough and the rail-fence, was open to the approach of infantry. It was the weakest part of the defences. On the right of the redoubt, along a cart-way, a fence was made similar to the one on the left. The redoubt and breastwork constituted a good defence against cannon and musketry, but the fences were hardly more than the shadow of protection.

TEXT CREDIT: Battle of Bunker Hill

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Henry Ford

Ford Motor Company. The automaker was founded by Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) and incorporated on June 16, 1903.

Title: [Henry Ford, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing slightly left] / Hartsook photo. Creator(s): Hartsook, photographer
Date Created / Published: [1919(?)] Medium: 1 photographic print.
Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-111278 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 12362 [P&P] [P&P]

Notes: National Photo Company Collection. Copyright by Keystone View Co., Inc., of N.Y.

Subjects: Ford, Henry,--1863-1947.

Format: Photographic prints--1910-1920. Portrait photographs--1910-1920.

Collections: National Photo Company Collection.

Henry FordHenry Ford, c. 1919. Born: July 30, 1863. Greenfield Township, Dearborn, Michigan, U.S. Died: April 7, 1947 (aged 83). Fair Lane, Dearborn, Michigan, U.S. Occupation: Business, Engineering. Net worth: increase$188.1 billion, based on information from Forbes – February 2008.

Religion: Protestant Episcopal. Spouse: Clara Jane Bryant. Children: Edsel Ford. Parents: William Ford and Mary Ford.

TEXT RESOURCES:

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

John of England signs Magna Carta June 19th, 1215

JOHN SIGNS MAGNA CHARTA, June 19th, 1215.

When men have been working all their lives, and have earned money and bought houses, or land, or goods, it is fair that they should do with their earnings — which are called their property — what they think fit, so that they injure no one; and it is just the same if their fathers or friends have worked and left them their property.

In order, however, that we may pay soldiers and sailors to fight for us, — judges to listen to our complaints and give us justice,—ministers to see that every thing goes on well at home, and that foreigners do not harm us, — and a king to overlook, appoint, and remove all these public servants, we must give up a part of our property to the king, or, in other words, we must pay taxes. If a man has done no harm to any one, — pays all that he owes, — and fulfils all his promises, it is fair that he should have leave to go where he likes, and to live in peace, so that he too hurts no one. When a nation (which means the people of a country) are able to do what they like with their property and themselves, so that they do not injure Others, they are free; and the more free a nation is, the better, and happier, and braver it is.

John of England signs Magna CartaWilliam Harvey 1796-1866, English engraver and designer.

Title: Historical pictures, England, Soc. for the diffusion of useful knowledge. Author: England. Publisher: Knight, 1835. Original from: Oxford University, Digitized: Sep 19, 2006. Subjects: History › General History / General.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, in this case 1835, are now in the public domain.

These images are also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case William Harvey 1796-1866, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year.

When people are not allowed to possess any property, but must give all their earnings to their masters or their king, — and when they cannot go where they please, but may be confined or punished as their masters or their kings please, — they are slaves. Most nations are not quite free, nor yet quite slaves. In the time of King John, six hundred years ago, the English were not nearly so free as they are now; but we should be far less free than we are, if the Bishops and Abbots and Barons in King John's time had not acted bravely, and wisely, and nobly, against their bad king.

John was in the habit of casting men into prison, and taking their property, and sometimes even of putting them to death, just as he thought fit. It was his duty as king to see that any one who was injured had justice done him; but men could not get justice except after long delays, or at great expense, either of which often ruined them; and he raised taxes unjustly for his own private purposes.

The Barons, who held great estates in England, being very angry at these misdeeds of the king, assembled together with their tenants, so that they had a large army. After following the king some time, they met him at Runnimede, which is the name of a meadow between Windsor and Staines, two towns on the banks of the Thames; and, after four days' disputing with him, made him sign a parchment, in which he declared that no man in England should have his property taken from him by the king for taxes without the consent of the Parliament — that no freeman should be imprisoned without trial before the judges of the land and people of his own rank;— that the king would not refuse justice, or delay it, or sell it.

This parchment the king swore to observe. It was called the Great Charter of England, or, in Latin, "Magna Charta;" and the more the kings of England have been made to attend to it, the more free the English have been.

TEXT CREDIT: Historical pictures, England

Monday, June 13, 2011

Univac Universal Automatic Computer Model I

Universal Automatic Computer Model I MANUFACTURER Remington Rand Univac Division of Sperry Rand Corporation. APPLICATIONS Manufacturer General purpose large scale digital computing. exhibited at the Deutsches Museum in Munich.

On June 14, 1951, the U.S. Census Bureau dedicates UNIVAC, the world's first commercially produced electronic digital computer.

Wednesday, June 15th. Sixty years ago, a device was demonstrated in Philadelphia that sparked a revolution in the way most Americans now live and work. The device was the first commercial electronic computer -- UNIVAC I. Built for the U.S. Census Bureau to tabulate the 1950 Census, UNIVAC I ended the use of punch cards after many decades and heralded the information age. The public first became aware of the computer when it was used on television election night in 1952 to predict that Dwight Eisenhower would win the presidential contest. Sources: Chase's Calendar of Events 2011, p. 320 Statistical Abstract of the United States 2011, t. 259.

The Census Bureau continued to use updated versions of Herman Hollerith's 1890 electric counting machine through the 1940 census. Processing and tabulation technology took a great leap forward during World War II, when the War Department (precursor to the Department of Defense) began to explore the use of electronic digital computers to process ballistic information. After the war, many of that project's engineers foresaw the peacetime benefits of such a device: computers had the ability to far outstrip the processing speed of older non-digital counting machines. Their efforts brought the Census Bureau into the computer age.

Univac Universal Automatic Computer Model IDate: Date: 29.11.2005 Author: Original uploader was Matthias.Kirschner at en.wikipedia. Approval ( To use this file ) This image is in the public domain.

This image has been (or is hereby) by its author, Matthias.Kirschner on German Wikipedia , in the public domain transferred. This applies worldwide.

If this is not legally possible: Matthias.Kirschner grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.


In 1943, the National Defense Research Council (NDRC) approved the design and construction of the Electronic Numeric Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) Link to a non-federal Web site to be used by the War Department's Ballistic Research Laboratory. The computer was built over the course of three years by a team of engineers led by John W. Mauchly and his former student J. Presper Eckert.

During ENIAC project, Mauchly met with several Census Bureau officials to discuss non-military applications for electronic computing devices. In 1946, with ENIAC completed, Mauchly and Eckert were able to secure a study contract from the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) to begin work on a computer designed for use by the Census Bureau. This study, originally scheduled for six months, took about a year to complete. The final result were specifications for the Universal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC).

Univac Universal Automatic Computer Model IPhoto Credit: U.S. Census Bureau, Public Information Office (PIO) Free to use in news media and public information products. CREDITS: Photos: Photographs by the U.S. Census Bureau, Public Information Office (PIO).

This image or file is a work of an employee of the U.S. Census Bureau, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

UNIVAC was, effectively, an updated version of ENIAC. Data could be input using magnetic computer tape (and, by the early 1950's, punch cards). It was tabulated using vacuum tubes and state-of-the-art circuits then either printed out or stored on more magnetic tape.

Mauchly and Eckert began building UNIVAC I in 1948 and delivered the completed machine to the Census Bureau in March 1951. The computer was used to tabulate part of the 1950 population census and the entire 1954 economic census. Throughout the 1950's, UNIVAC also played a key role in several monthly economic surveys. The computer excelled at working with the repetitive but intricate mathematics involved in weighting and sampling for these surveys.

UNIVAC I, as the first successful civilian computer, was a key part of the dawn of the computer age. Despite early delays, the UNIVAC program at the Census Bureau was a great success. The Bureau purchased a second UNIVAC I machine in the mid-1950's, and two UNIVAC 1105 [JPG] computers for the 1960 census.

TEXT CREDIT: census.gov

March 31, 1951 – Remington Rand delivers the first UNIVAC I computer to the United States Census Bureau.

More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2011/06/univac-universal-automatic-computer.html

Sunday, June 12, 2011

Happy 4th of July from Outer Space Clip Art

. Happy 4th of July from Outer Space. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images

Facts for Features — The Fourth of July 2011.

2.5 million: In July 1776, the estimated number of people living in the newly independent nation. Source: Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970.

311.7 million: The nation's estimated population on this July Fourth. Source: Population clock

Patriotic-Sounding Place Names

Thirty-one places have “liberty” in their names. The most populous one as of April 1, 2010, is Liberty, Mo. (29,149) Iowa, with four, has more of these places than any other state: Libertyville, New Liberty, North Liberty and West Liberty.

Thirty-five places have “eagle” in their names. The most populous one is Eagle Pass, Texas (26,248).

Eleven places have “independence” in their names. The most populous one is Independence, Mo. (116,830).

Nine places have “freedom” in their names. The most populous one is New Freedom, Pa. (4,464).

One place with “patriot” in the name. Patriot, Ind. (209).

Five places have “America” in their names. The most populous is American Fork, Utah (26,263).

Source: American FactFinder.

Happy 4th of July from Outer Space clip art

JPL Image Use Policy: Unless otherwise noted, images and video on JPL public web sites (public sites ending with a jpl.nasa.gov address) may be used for any purpose without prior permission. Unless otherwise noted in the caption information for an image, the credit line should be "Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

NASA still images, audio files and video generally are not copyrighted.

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services. If a NASA image includes an identifiable person, using the image for commercial purposes may infringe that person's right of privacy or publicity.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Saturday, June 11, 2011

The Wizard of Oz Dorothy and Toto image in the Poppy Field

They walked along listening to the singing of the bright-colored birds and looking at the lovely flowers which now became so thick that the ground was carpeted with them. There were big yellow and white and blue and purple blossoms, besides great clusters of scarlet poppies, which were so brilliant in color they almost dazzled Dorothy's eyes.

"Aren't they beautiful?" the girl asked, as she bieathed in the spicy scent of the flowers.

"I suppose so," answered the Scarecrow. "When I have brains I shall probably like them better."

"If I only had a heart I should love them," added the Tin Woodman.

"I always did like flowers," said the Lion; "they seem so helpless and frail. But there are none in the forest so bright as these."

They now came upon more and more of the big scarlet poppies, and fewer and fewer of the other flowers; and soon they found themselves in the midst of a great meadow of poppies. Now it is well known that when there are many of these flowers together their odor is so powerful that anyone who breathes it falls asleep, and if the sleeper is not carried away from the scent of the flowers he sleeps on and on forever. But Dorothy did not know this, nor could she get away from the bright red flowers that were everywhere about; so presently her eyes grew heavy and she felt she must sit down to rest and to sleep.


Title: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Author: L. Frank Baum. Illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. Publisher: George M. Hill Co., 1900. Original from: the International Children's Digital Library. Digitized: Jan 14, 2009. Length: 261 pages. Subjects Fiction › Fantasy › General Fiction / Classics Fiction / Fantasy / General.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, in this case 1900, are now in the public domain.

These images are also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case William Wallace Denslow died March 29, 1915, and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year.

But the Tin Woodman would not let her do this.

"We must hurry and get back to the road of yellow brick before dark," he said; and the Scarecrow agreed with him. So they kept walking until Dorothy could stand no longer. Her eyes closed in spite of herself and she forgot where she was and fell among the poppies, fast asleep.

"What shall we do?" asked the Tin Woodman.

"If we leave her here she will die," said the Lion. "The smell of the flowers is killing us all. I myself can scarcely keep my eyes open and the dog is asleep already."

It was true; Toto had fallen down beside his little mistress. But the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman, not being made of flesh, were not troubled by the scent of the flowers.

"Run fast," said the Scarecrow to the Lion, "and get out of this deadly flower-bed as soon as you can. We will bring the little girl with us, but if you should fall asleep you are too big to be carried."

So the Lion aroused himself and bounded forward as fast as he could go. In a moment he was out of sight.

"Let us make a chair with our hands, and carry her," said the Scarecrow. So they picked up Toto and put the dog in Dorothy's lap, and then they made a chair with their hands for the seat and their arms for the arms and carried the sleeping girl between them through the flowers.

On and on they walked, and it seemed that the great carpet of deadly flowers that surrounded them would never end. They followed the bend of the river, and at last came upon their friend the Lion, lying fast asleep among the poppies. The flowers had been too strong for the huge beast and he had given up, at last, and fallen only a short distance from the end of the poppy-bed, where the sweet grass spread in beautiful green fields before them.

"We can do nothing for him," said the Tin Woodman, sadly; "for he is much too heavy to lift. We must leave him here to sleep on forever, and perhaps he will dream that he has found courage at last."

"I'm sorry," said the Scarecrow; "the Lion was a very good comrade for one so cowardly. But let us go on."

They carried the sleeping girl to a pretty spot beside the river, far enough from the poppy field to prevent her breathing any more of the poison of the flowers, and here they laid her gently on the soft grass and waited for the fresh breeze to waken her.

TEXT CREDIT: The new Wizard of Oz

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Portrait of Les Paul, New York, N.Y. reissue 1958 Gibson Les Paul

Title: [Portrait of Les Paul, New York, N.Y.(?), ca. Jan. 1947] [graphic] Alternate Title: Caption from Down Beat: Finding cabs mobbed by holiday shoppers, had Superman sweep me from 24th floor, RKO bldg., to Paramount theater. Posed poser to Les Paul, former studio guitarist who in '46 gained fame with Bing, the Andrews Sisters, records and nite clubs.

Creator: Gottlieb, William P., 1917-, photographer. Type of Material: still image. Genre: graphic, Portrait photographs-1940-1950. Film negatives-1940-1950.

Language: English. Forms: graphic, photonegative, Physical Description, 1 negative : b&w ; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. Notes: Reference print available in Music Division, Library of Congress.

Purchase William P. Gottlieb. General information about the Gottlieb Collection is available at http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/html/gottlieb/gottlieb-home.html. In: "Posin'," Down Beat, v. 16, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1947), p. 3. Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress).

Assignment Note: Gottlieb Collection Assignment No. 437. Subjects: Paul, Les, Jazz musicians--1940-1950, Guitarists--1940-1950

Call Number: LC-GLB23- 0700, Assignment: 437 (b&w film neg.) LC-GLB23-0700 DLC. Identifier: hdl:loc.music/gottlieb.07001
URL: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.music/gottlieb.07001.

Use and Reproduction: Mr. Gottlieb has dedicated these works to the public domain, but rights of privacy and publicity may apply.

In accordance with the wishes of William Gottlieb, the photographs in this collection entered into the public domain on February 16, 2010, but rights of privacy and publicity may apply. Privacy and publicity rights protect the interests of the person(s) who may be the subject(s) of the work or intellectual creation. Users of photographs in the Gottlieb collection are responsible for clearing any privacy or publicity rights associated with the use of the images.

Credit Line: William P. Gottlieb/Ira and Leonore S. Gershwin Fund Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress.

reissue 1958 Gibson Les PaulDescription: 2005 Gibson '58 Reissue Les Paul in Iced Tea in original case.

The reissue 1958 and 1959 Gibson Les Paul are among the most sought after new guitars on the market, with prices ranging from $2,000-$5,000.

The original 1959 Les Paul is often regarded as the 'holy grail' of the Les Paul family. They have sold for more than $300,000 on multiple occasions. Date: 2007-02-20 (original upload date)

This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Zeppelin4life at the English Wikipedia project. This applies worldwide.

In case this is not legally possible: Zeppelin4life grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Wednesday, June 08, 2011

Benjamin Franklin's experiment flying kite during thunderstorm

June 10, 1752, Benjamin Franklin flying a kite during a thunderstorm collects a charge in a Leyden jar when the kite is struck by lightning.

Franklin's experiment, June 1752: Demonstrating the identity of lightning and electricty, from which he invented the lightning rod.

Creator(s): Currier & Ives., Date Created / Published: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1876. Medium: 1 print : lithograph. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2364 (color film copy slide) LC-USZ62-1433 (b&w film copy neg.) Call Number: PGA - Currier & Ives--Franklin's experiment ... (A size) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes:
Currier & Ives : a catalogue raisonné / compiled by Gale Research. Detroit, MI : Gale Research, c1983, no. 2305

Format:
Lithographs--1870-1880.

Collections:
Popular Graphic Arts

Benjamin Franklin flying a kite during a thunderstormThis IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case circa 1876) are now in the public domain.

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Gorilla

Gorillas are the largest extant species of primates. They are ground-dwelling, predominantly herbivorous apes that inhabit the forests of central Africa. Gorillas are divided into two species and either four or five subspecies.

The Gorilla, Njina, or in the language of the natives, Mpungo, {Gorilla gina), the sole representative of the family of the Gorillas, is scarcely smaller but a great deal broader in the shoulders than a full-grown Man. The height of the male reaches on an average from sixty to seventy-two inches; the width of the shoulders thirtyeight inches. The females are smaller. The length and strength of the trunk and the upper extremities, the large. size of the hands and feet, the middle fingers and toes of which are joined by membranes, form the most prominent characteristics. The most striking features in the large head, which because of the shortness of the neck and its powerful muscles seems to be set immediately on the trunk, are the prominent arches of the eyebrows, the eyes lying deep in their sockets, the broad,' flat nose, and the large mouth, bounded by thick lips and provided with a fearful set of teeth. The hair is rather long, shaggy, of dark colors, gray, brown or reddish. The face is left free from hair to the eyebrows, as also the ears and the hands and feet laterally and at the extremities.

GorillaTitle Brehm's Life of animals: a complete natural history for popular home instruction and for the use of schools. Mammalia Brehm's Life of Animals: A Complete Natural History for Popular Home Instruction and for the Use of Schools. Mammalia, Alfred Edmund Brehm.

Authors: Alfred Edmund Brehm, Edward PechuĂ«l-Loesche, Wilhelm Haacke, Richard Schmidtlein. Publisher: Marquis, 1896. Length: 606 pages. Subjects: Science › Life Sciences › Zoology › General Animal behavior Animals, Habits and behavior of Mammals Nature / Mammals
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / General.

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this circa 1896) are now in the public domain.

The artist here shows the Gorilla in his native forest and one cannot but be startled at the wonderfully human-like face.

The great Ape is In a striking pose, being at rest, yet alert, as the keen, hazel eyes plainly show. The large nostrils are wide open, the wide mouth firmly closed,' and the chin is resting upon the back of the huge muscular right hand that in turn lays upon the left fore-arm extended across the breast. At the first approach of danger all would be changed; the hair of the forehead and head would become erect and vibrate rapidly and its huge bellowings and violent beating of the chest would send awe if not terror to the bravest of Men.

It is still impossible to determine the native country of the Gorilla exactly. It seems to be found only in a relatively limited part of western Africa, or, more definitely speaking, in Lower Guinea. It has been seen on the coast between the equator and the fifth parallel of south latitude, and in the western parts of the adjoining mountains.

As it always lives in woods, it is not probable that it would be found to the south as far as the Congo or beyond the Gaboon country, at least as far as Cameroon, as that part of the continent has more rain, and, in consequence, abounds in woods. It is possible that the Gorilla also lives in those parts of Upper Guinea that are equally favored.

TEXT CREDIT: Brehm's Life of animals: a complete natural history for popular home instruction and for the use of schools. Mammalia

Monday, June 06, 2011

Drive-in movie theaters

June 6, 1933 motorists park their automobiles on the grounds of Richard Hollingshead Jr.'s Park-In Theater, the first ever drive-in movie theater, on Crescent Boulevard in Camden, New Jersey. The cost for a ticket: 25 cents per vehicle and 25 cents per person.

Mahnomen City Drive-In Movie Theater, U.S. Highway 59 at Minnesota Highway 200, Mahnomen, Mahnomen, MN.

Creator(s): Historic American Buildings Survey, creator. Medium: Photo(s): 1 (5 x 7 in.) Photo Caption Page(s): 1. Reproduction Number: [See Call Number] Call Number: HABS MINN,44-MAHN,1 Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Notes:
Survey number HABS MN-121

Subjects:
MINNESOTA--Mahnomen--Mahnomen

Collections:
Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey

Part of: Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress) Contents: Photograph caption(s) General view looking East

Drive-in movie theatersHistoric American Buildings Survey / Historic American Engineering Record. Material in these collections is generally considered to be in the public domain. Publication and other forms of distribution: The original measured drawings and most of the photographs and data pages in HABS/HAER/HALS were created for the U.S. Government and are considered to be in the public domain.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS [or HAER or HALS], Reproduction number [e.g., "HABS ILL, 16-CHIG, 33-2 "]

This image or file is a work of an employee of the U.S. Government, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Drive-In Theatre, Route 66Title: 66 Drive-In Theatre, Route 66, Carthage, Missouri. Creator(s): Highsmith, Carol M., 1946-, photographer. Date Created / Published: 2009 August 12. Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-04413 (original digital file)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. Carol M. Highsmith's photographs are in the public domain. Publication and other forms of distribution: Permitted. Ms. Highsmith has stipulated that her photographs are in the public domain. (See P&P Collection Files.)

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, photograph by Carol M. Highsmith [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USZ62-123456]

Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 04413 (ONLINE) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes:
66 Drive-In Theatre built in 1949, one of less than 400 Drive-In theatres in the United States today.
Title, date, and subjects provided by the photographer.
Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith's America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Gift and purchase; Carol M. Highsmith; 2009; (DLC/PP-2010:031).
Forms part of: Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.
Photographer's choice (America project).

Subjects:
United States--Missouri--Carthage.
Drive-in theaters.
Route 66.
Carthage, Missouri.
America.

Format:
Digital photographs--Color--2000-2010.

Collections:
Highsmith (Carol M.) Archive

Part of: Highsmith, Carol M., 1946- Carol M. Highsmith Archive.

TEXT RESOURCES: www.history.com/this-day-in-history

Sunday, June 05, 2011

Orangutans

The orangutan, the chief representative of the anthropoids in Asia, differs from the African forms of this group, almost at the first glance, in the height of his skull, of which the fore-part is compressed and shortened in a backward direction. In the aged male it is, however, provided with high and erect bony crests, which give a prognathous appearance to the countenance. We take an aged male as the type of our description.

The forehead is high and erect, not retreating like that of the chimpanzee; it is open, and has moderately convex frontal eminences. From the centre of the forehead a round or bluntly oval eminence sometimes projects. The supra-orbital ridges are strongly arched, yet not so prominent as that of the aged male chimpanzee, setting aside that of the gorilla. The eyes are not widely opened, nor are their lids large and furrowed, but on the lower lids there are deep wrinkles. The small bridge of the nose is generally much depressed, but sometimes assumes a slightly conical form as it issues from the central longitudinal depression of the face.

The end of the nose, further removed from the eyes than is generally the case in the chimpanzee, is not so broad as it is in the latter animal and in the gorilla. The wings of the nose are narrow and highly arched in their upper part, divided from each other by a vertical furrow, and the nostrils are small and oval, separated by a thin partition. The upper lip is high, broad, and projecting, and seldom much wrinkled. It is divided from the cheeks and from the upper part of the face by a deep depression; and behind the cheeks two large and long-shaped or sometimes triangular pads of fat often pn ject forwards and downwards.

The very mobile lips are furrowed, and not remarkably thick. The chin is very retreating, but somewhat uniformly rounded in front. The small ear averages 55 mm. in length, and 12 mm. in width, and has a general resemblance in structure to the human ear. On the forepart of the short, thick neck there are irregular, and in some places very deep circular folds of skin. The throat-pouch distends part of this slack, wrinkled skin, which hangs down in front like a great empty wallet.

OrangutanTitle: Anthropoid apes, Volume 52 of International scientific series, Author Robert Hartmann. Publisher: D. Appleton and company, 1886, Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Aug 25, 2008. Length: 326 pages. Subjects: Apes.

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this circa 1886) are now in the public domain.

The fourth finger is comparatively long. The palm of the hand is flat, only marked by a few deep furrows. The long, slender fingers are laterally compressed, and the nails on their tapering ends are arched.

The thighs, somewhat compressed on the inner side, are, however, very muscular, but become much smaller on their back side. The calf of the leg is less developed than in the gorilla, or even than in the chimpanzee. The feet are, like the hands, long and slender. The narrow, flat heels project very slightly behind. The great toes are short, with wide extremities, rounded above, and provided on the sole with thick, fatty skin. In old age these animals not only often lose the nails of their great toes, but sometimes even the last phalanges themselves. This is not merely a disease produced by confinement, as is the case with sea-cat monkeys, hyenas, etc., which in this condition lose portions of their tails or toes, but it also occurs among orang-utans in their wild state. The middle toe is the longest, and the fourth toe is the shortest. Layers of fat may be observed on the under side of all but the great toe, where they rarely occur. The backs of the hands and feet are covered with very ribbed and wrinkled skin, and on the hands there are callosities.

This animal, of a quieter and more phlegmatic disposition than the gorilla and chimpanzee, has a very strange appearance, with its projecting head and short neck; its face widening in the middle and tapering towards the forehead and chin; its tunshaped trunk, long, thin extremities, and shaggy coat. It differs widely from the chimpnnzee and gorilla in these particulars. In the young male the compression of the forehead is less marked than in aged animals, and the bony crests which conduce to raise the coronal arch in its upper and hinder part are also absent. The supra-orbital arches are less strongly developed, the jaws are less prominent, and the layers of fat upon the cheeks are absent. The head is more detached from the neck, the structure of the whole body is slenderer, the expression of the countenance is milder.

TEXT CREDIT: Anthropoid apes

Saturday, June 04, 2011

William McKinley Sound Money

June 5, 1933. The U.S. Congress abrogates the United States' use of the gold standard by enacting a joint resolution (48 Stat. 112) nullifying the right of creditors to demand payment in gold.

Whereas the holding of or dealing in gold affect the public interest, and are therefore subject to proper regulation and restriction; and

Whereas the existing emergency has disclosed that provisions of obligations which purport to give the obligee a right to require payment in gold or a particular kind of currency of the United States, or in an amount in money of the United States measured thereby, obstruct the power of the Congress to regulate the value of the money of the United States, and are inconsistent with the declared policy of the Congress to maintain at all times the equal power of every dollar, coined or issued by the United States, in the markets and in payment of debts.

Now, therefore, be it resolved that (a) every provision contained in or made with respect to any obligation which purports to give the obligee a right to require payment in gold or a particular kind of coin or currency or an amount in dollars of the United States measured thereby, is declared to be against public policy; and no such provision shall be contained in or made with respect to any obligation hereafter incurred. Every obligation, heretofore or hereafter incurred, whether or not any such provision is contained therein or made with respect thereto shall be discharged upon payment, dollar for dollar, in any coin or currency which at the time of payment is legal tender for public and private debts.
William McKinley Sound MoneyCongress passed the Gold Reserve Act on 30 January 1934, the measure nationalized all gold by ordering the Federal Reserve banks to turn over their supply to the U.S. Treasury. In return the banks received gold certificates to be used as reserves against deposits and Federal Reserve notes. The act also authorized the president to devalue the gold dollar so that it would have no more than 60 percent of its existing weight. Under this authority the president, on 31 January 1934, fixed the value of the gold dollar at 59.06 cents.

Title: Prosperity at home, prestige abroad Date Created/Published: [between 1895 and 1900] Medium: 1 print (poster). Summary: Campaign poster showing William McKinley holding U.S. flag and standing on gold coin "sound money", held up by group of men, in front of ships "commerce" and factories "civilization". Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-1329 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZC2-201 (color film copy slide) LC-USZ62-35595 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case circa 1895 - 1900) are now in the public domain.

Call Number: POS - ADV. 19th c. - Elections. N67, no. 1 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes:
Color lithograph by Northwestern Litho. Co., Milwaukee.
This record contains unverified, old data from caption card.

Collections:
Posters: Artist Posters

TEXT RESOURCES:

Friday, June 03, 2011

Battle of Midway, 4-7 June 1942

The Battle of Midway, fought over and near the tiny U.S. mid-Pacific base at Midway atoll, represents the strategic high water mark of Japan's Pacific Ocean war. Prior to this action, Japan possessed general naval superiority over the United States and could usually choose where and when to attack. After Midway, the two opposing fleets were essentially equals, and the United States soon took the offensive.

Japanese Combined Fleet commander Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto moved on Midway in an effort to draw out and destroy the U.S. Pacific Fleet's aircraft carrier striking forces, which had embarassed the Japanese Navy in the mid-April Doolittle Raid on Japan's home islands and at the Battle of Coral Sea in early May. He planned to quickly knock down Midway's defenses, follow up with an invasion of the atoll's two small islands and establish a Japanese air base there. He expected the U.S. carriers to come out and fight, but to arrive too late to save Midway and in insufficient strength to avoid defeat by his own well-tested carrier air power.

Yamamoto's intended surprise was thwarted by superior American communications intelligence, which deduced his scheme well before battle was joined. This allowed Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the U.S. Pacific Fleet commander, to establish an ambush by having his carriers ready and waiting for the Japanese. On 4 June 1942, in the second of the Pacific War's great carrier battles, the trap was sprung. The perserverance, sacrifice and skill of U.S. Navy aviators, plus a great deal of good luck on the American side, cost Japan four irreplaceable fleet carriers, while only one of the three U.S. carriers present was lost. The base at Midway, though damaged by Japanese air attack, remained operational and later became a vital component in the American trans-Pacific offensive.

Dauntless dive bombers

USS Yorktown (CV-5)

Japanese aircraft carrier Hiryu
SBD "Dauntless" dive bombers from USS Hornet (CV-8) approaching the burning Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma to make the third set of attacks on her, during the early afternoon of 6 June 1942.

Mikuma had been hit earlier by strikes from Hornet and USS Enterprise (CV-6), leaving her dead in the water and fatally damaged.

Photo was enlarged from a 16mm color motion picture film. Note bombs hung beneath these planes. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives Collection.

Scene on board USS Yorktown (CV-5), shortly after she was hit by three Japanese bombs on 4 June 1942. Dense smoke is from fires in her uptakes, caused by a bomb that punctured them and knocked out her boilers.

Taken by Photographer 2rd Class William G. Roy from the starboard side of the flight deck, just in front of the forward 5"/38 gun gallery. Man with hammer at right is probably covering a bomb entry hole in the forward elevator.

Note arresting gear cables and forward palisade elements on the flight deck; CXAM radar antenna, large national ensign and YE homing beacon antenna atop the foremast; 5"/38, .50 caliber and 1.1" guns manned and ready at left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, U.S. National Archives Collection.

The burning Japanese aircraft carrier Hiryu, photographed by a plane from the carrier Hosho shortly after sunrise on 5 June 1942. Hiryu sank a few hours later. Note collapsed flight deck over the forward hangar.

Donation of Kazutoshi Hando, 1970. NHHC Photograph.

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TEXT CREDIT: Naval History and Heritage Command

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Ed White First American Spacewalker Gemini 4

Edward H. White II displays the U.S. flag on his space suit during his historic Gemini 4 spacewalk EVA

NASA Center: Johnson Space Center. Image # : S65-30431 Date: 06/03/1965. Title: Ed White First American Spacewalker.

Full Description: On June 3, 1965 Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go, effectively setting himself adrift in the zero gravity of space. For 23 minutes White floated and maneuvered himself around the Gemini spacecraft while logging 6500 miles during his orbital stroll. White was attached to the spacecraft by a 25 foot umbilical line and a 23-ft. tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand White carries a Hand Held Self Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) which is used to move about the weightless environment of space. The visor of his helmet is gold plated to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun.

Keywords: Edward White II Gemini 4 Gemini IV Extravehicular Activity EVA Tether Spacewalk Ed White Hand Held Self Maneuvering Unit HHSMU.

Subject Category: Astronauts, Gemini-Program, EVAs-Spacewalk,

Reference Numbers Center: JSC. Center Number: S65-30431. GRIN DataBase Number: GPN-2000-001181.

Source Information: Creator/Photographer: NASA James McDivitt, Original Source: DIGITAL

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If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services.

Credit is requested by NASA. Where a photographer is noted, please credit the photographer and his/her affiliated organization as well.

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

Flag Day Wallpaper June 14th Clip Art

Flag Day Wallpaper June 14th Clip Art. Overview: AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on AF.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This image or file is a work of an employee of the Department of Defense, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

FLAG-DAY Wallpaper-1280x1024. Created by Luke Borland of the Defense Media Activity. INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING WALLPAPER: Getting Started: The wallpaper should first be downloaded to a folder on your computer. You can either create a new folder or place the image in an existing folder. Windows XP Users: Select Start, open Control Panel and select the Display icon to open the Display Properties panel. From the tabs across the top select Desktop and scroll through the Background selection box, to select Browse. Navigate to the folder where you stored the wallpaper. Select and Apply the wallpaper and close the Display Properties window.

MAC OSX Users: Open System Preferences from the Drop down Apple icon. Select the Desktop & Screen Saver icon. Select Desktop from the box at the upper center of the page. Then select Choose Folder in the scroll down box.

Flag Day  Wallpaper June 14th

Navigate to the folder where you stored the wallpaper. Once you have selected the wallpaper Apply it and then close the Desktop & Screensaver window.

In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States which happened in 1777. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day; in August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.