Wednesday, April 30, 2008

4 Towers New York City Skyline

4 Towers New York City SkylineThe four towers from left to right.

The Trump Parc, 106 Central Park South (59th street) on the south west corner of 6th avenue (Avenue of the Americas)
When it was erected in 1930 as the Barbizon Plaza Hotel, this structure was noted for its flamboyant and unusual top. Trump Parc :: New York City Apartments

Next is the CitySpire Center, it is the tallest mixed-use skyscraper in New York City, located 142 West 56th Street. Finished in 1987, it is 75 stories high, with a total of 359,000 square feet of area. The building is owned by Tishman Speyer Properties.

Designed by Helmut Jahn, it is the 9th tallest building in New York City and the 38th tallest in the United States. CitySpire Center

Next up the Metropolitan Tower which is a 77-story, residential skyscraper at 142 west 57th street. The building has 235 apartment units. It is described as postmodern because it features setbacks and triangular shapes, dark glass and a sculpted base. Metropolitan Tower (New York)

Forth is Carnegie Hall Tower is a 60-story skyscraper located at 152 west 57th street, the tower was built in an architectural style in harmony with its neighbor Carnegie Hall, a New York landmark. This design won an Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in 1994. Carnegie Hall Tower

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Text License: Parts of this article are licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia articles CitySpire Center, Metropolitan Tower (New York) and Carnegie Hall Tower

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Eskimo mother carrying a child Clip Art



. Eskimo mother carrying a child Clip Art. Public Domain Clip Art Stock Photos and Images.

Eskimo mother carrying a child Digital ID: ppmsc 02280 Source: digital file from original.

Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsc-02280 (digital file from original) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (84 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (16 megabytes)

TITLE: Eskimo mother carrying a child on her back. CALL NUMBER: LOT 11453-2, no. 8 [P and P] No known restrictions on reproduction.

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-ppmsc-02280 (digital file from original) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1916(?)

NOTES: Title transcribed from caption accompanying item. Forms part of: Frank and Frances Carpenter collection (Library of Congress). Gift; Mrs. W. Chapin Huntington; 1951.

Eskimo mother carrying a child clip art

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (digital file from original) ppmsc 02280 loc.pnp/ppmsc.02280 CONTROL #: 99615027

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-ppmsc-02280]

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Monday, April 28, 2008

New York City carriage horses in Central Park

New York City carriage horses in Central Park at 72d street traverse, April 26, 2008. Carriages can be found all year round lined up along Central Park South between 5th and 6th Avenues. Horse-Drawn Carriages

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

carriage horses in Central Park

carriage horses in Central Park

carriage horses in Central Park

carriage horses in Central Park

Sunday, April 27, 2008

Mexican mother and child, San Antonio, Texas



Mexican mother and child, San Antonio, Texas. Digital ID: fsa 8a25585 Source: digital file from intermediary roll film. Reproduction Number: LC-USF33-012071-M2 (b&w film nitrate neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA. Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (119 kilobytes)

TITLE: Mexican mother and child in doorway, San Antonio, Texas. CALL NUMBER: LC-USF33- 012071-M2 [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USF33-012071-M2 (b&w film nitrate neg.)

MEDIUM: 1 negative : nitrate ; 35 mm. CREATED, PUBLISHED: 1939 Mar. CREATOR: Lee, Russell, 1903- photographer. NOTES: Title and other information from caption card. LOT 0590 (Location of corresponding print.) Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944.

Mexican mother and child, San Antonio, TexasPART OF: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Copyright.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (digital file from intermediary roll film) fsa 8a25585 loc.pnp/fsa.8a25585 OTHER NUMBER: H 3614 CONTROL #: fsa1997025550/PP

Saturday, April 26, 2008

Native American Mother and Child


Native American Mother and Child. Digital ID: cph 3c10225 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-110225 (b&w film copy neg.) Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (87 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (12 megabytes)

Edward S. Curtis Collection Rights and Restrictions Information. Images in this collection are considered to be in the public domain.

Publication and other forms of distribution: Permitted. Photographs in this collection were deposited for copyright bewtween 1899 and 1929. Works copyrighted before 1923 are now in the public domain. The copyright for the works after 1923 was not renewed, so they are also in the public domain.See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS"

TITLE: [Achomawi mother and child] CALL NUMBER: LOT 12318-F [P&P] Check for an online group record (may link to related items) REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-110225 (b&w film copy neg.)

Native American Mother and ChildMEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED, PUBLISHED: c1923. CREATOR: Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952, photographer.

NOTES: J262604 U.S. Copyright Office. Edward S. Curtis Collection. Curtis no. 3941. Published in: The North American Indian / Edward S. Curtis. [Seattle, Wash.] : Edward S. Curtis, 1907-30 suppl., v. 13, p. 136.

DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c10225 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ CONTROL #: 94503376

Friday, April 25, 2008

African American Mother and Child



African American Mother and Child. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-125148 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Digital ID: cph 3c25148 Source: b&w film copy neg. Medium resolution JPEG version (30 kilobytes) Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (86 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (12 megabytes)

TITLE: Present day mother and child ... not pure Negro. CALL NUMBER: LOT 13262-2, no. 2 [P&P] Check for an online group record (may link to related items)

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-125148 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on reproduction. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print : gelatin silver ; 10 x 8 in. CREATED/PUBLISHED: [between 1937 and ca. 1938]

African American Mother and ChildNOTES: Title transcribed from item. 30676. Forms part of: Portraits of African American ex-slaves from the U.S. Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project slave narratives collections.

PART OF: Portraits of African American ex-slaves from the U.S. Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project slave narratives collections

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from original) ppmsc 01036 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/
(b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c25148 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ CONTROL #: 99615222

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Blue Hyacinth Spring Flowers

Blue hyacinth

Blue hyacinth
Blue hyacinths early spring April 3 2008 Central Park, New York City, New York Just west of The Reservoir

Hyacinth (plant) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Hyacinth is any plant of genus Hyacinthus, which are bulbous herbs formerly placed in the lily family Liliaceae but now regarded as the type genus of the separate family Hyacinthaceae. Hyacinths are native to the eastern Mediterranean region east to Iran and Turkmenistan. Hyacinths are sometimes associated with rebirth. The Hyacinth flower is used in the Haftseen table setting for the Persian New Year celebration Norouz held during the Spring Equinox.
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Hyacinth (plant) SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

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If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Chinese Mother and children

Chinese Mother and children

Digital ID: det 4a05588 Source: digital file from intermediary roll film. Reproduction Number: LC-D4-9044 (b&w glass neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (215 kilobytes)
TITLE: [Chinese woman and children] CALL NUMBER: LC-D4-9044 [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-D4-9044 (b&w glass neg.) MEDIUM: 1 negative : glass ; 8 x 10 in.

CREATED/PUBLISHED: c1901. CREATOR: Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942, photographer.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years.

See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States.

NOTES: "9049" and "WHJ 407" on negative. No Detroit Publishing Co. no. Gift; State Historical Society of Colorado; 1949.

PART OF: Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from intermediary roll film) det 4a05588 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ CONTROL #: det1994004861/PP

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

Spring Cherry Blossoms Central Park NYC

Spring Cherry Blossoms Central Park NYC

Spring Cherry Blossoms Central Park NYC

Spring Cherry Blossoms Central Park NYC
Spring Cherry Blossoms Central Park New York City. Early April 2008.

Image 1: Cherry tree across the sheep meadow near the west drive, looking west toward Tavern on the Green's windows in the back ground.

Image 2: looking east just south of the Naumburg Band Shell. 5th avenue apartment buildings rise in the background.

Image 3: Quiet lawn near the Conservatory Water along the east side of the park at 72d street
I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Monday, April 21, 2008

Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon Finish Line.1910Boston Marathon Finish Line.1910. Author: Unknown. Caption: Fred S. Cameron of Amherst, Nova Scotia winning Marathon Race at Boston. April 19, 1910. Time 2:28:52 3-5.
The original work shown in this image is free content because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

This work may however not be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Boston Marathon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event hosted by the city of Boston, Massachusetts, on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897 and inspired by the success of the first modern-day marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics, the Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's most prestigious road racing events. The marathon is one of five members of the World Marathon Majors.

Today, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) manages this event. Amateur and professional runners from all over the world compete in the Boston Marathon each year, braving the hilly New England terrain and unpredictable, sometimes brutal weather to take part in the race.

The event attracts an average of about 20,000 registered participants each year. In the 100th running of the Boston Marathon in 1996, the number of participants reached 38,000. While there are cash prizes awarded to the winners of the marathon, most of the runners take part in the historical marathon just for the joy of participating in such a prestigious race.

The Boston Marathon was originally a local event, but its fame and status have attracted runners from all over the world. For most of its history, the Boston Marathon was a free event, and the only prize awarded for winning the race was a wreath woven from olive branches. However, corporate-sponsored cash prizes began to be awarded in the 1980s, when professional athletes began to refuse to run the race without cash awards. The first cash prize for winning the marathon was awarded in 1986.

Women were not allowed to enter the Boston Marathon officially until 1972. Roberta (Bobbi) Gibb is recognized as the first woman to run the entire Boston Marathon (in 1966). In 1967, Kathrine Switzer, who had registered as "K. V. Switzer", was the first woman to run with a race number. She finished, despite a celebrated incident in which race official Jock Semple tried to rip off her numbers and eject her from the race.[1] In 1996 the B.A.A. retroactively recognized as champions the unofficial women's leaders of 1966 through 1971.

In recent years, critics have pointed to the dominance of foreign-born athletes in the event (especially runners from Kenya) to back their arguments that American professional running is lagging behind the rest of the world in terms of producing quality athletes. However, foreign dominance of the race is nothing new. Between 1946 and 1967 only one American (John J. Kelley in 1957) won the marathon in an era when Finland and Japan were the distance powerhouses.

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Sunday, April 20, 2008

Pink Tulips Spring Flowers

Pink Tulips Spring Flowers. Central Park, New York City, New York. April 2007. Tulip bed near Straberry Fields in Central Park at 72d street and Central Park West.

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If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Tulipa commonly called Tulip is a genus of about 100 species of bulbous flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. The native range of the species include southern Europe, north Africa, and Asia from Anatolia and Iran in the east to northeast of China. The centre of diversity of the genus is in the Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains and the steppes of Kazakhstan. A number of species and many hybrid cultivars are grown in gardens, used as pot plants or as fresh cut flowers.

Pink Tulips Spring Flowers. Central Park

Pink Tulips Spring Flowers. Central Park

Pink Tulips Spring Flowers. Central Park

The species are perennials from bulbs, the tunicate bulbs are often produced on the ends of stolons and covered with glabrous to variously hairy papery coverings. The species include short low growing plants to tall upright plants, growing from 10 to 70 centimeters (4–27 in) tall. Plants with typically 2 to 6 leaves, with some species having up to 12 leaves. The cauline foliage is strap-shaped, waxy-coated, usually light to medium green and alternately arranged.

The blades are somewhat fleshy and linear to oblong in shape. The large flowers are produced on scapes or subscapose stems normally lacking bracts. The stems have no leaves to a few leaves, with large species having some leaves and smaller species have none. Typically species have one flower per stem but a few species have up to four flowers. The colorful and attractive cup shaped flowers have three petals and three sepals, which are most often termed tepals because they are nearly identical.

The six petaloid tepals are often marked near the bases with darker markings. The flowers have six basifixed, distinct stamens with filaments shorter than the tepals and the stigmas are districtly 3-lobed. The ovaries are superior with three chambers. The 3 angled fruits are leathery textured capsules, ellipsoid to subglobose in shape, containing numerous flat disc-shaped seeds in two rows per locule.

Although tulips are associated with Holland, both the flower and its name originated in the Ottoman Empire. The tulip is actually not a Dutch flower as many people tend to believe. The tulip, or "Lale" as it is called in Turkey, is a flower indigenous to Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey and other parts of Central Asia. A Dutch ambassador in Turkey in the 16th century, who was also a great floral enthusiast, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, got their very names because of their Persian origins.

Tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century; the word tulip, which earlier in English appeared in such forms as tulipa or tulipant, entered the language by way of French tulipe and its obsolete form tulipan or by way of Modern Latin tulīpa, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend, "muslin, gauze." (The English word turban, first recorded in English in the 16th century, can also be traced to Ottoman Turkish tülbend.) The Turkish word for gauze, with which turbans can be wrapped, seems to have been used for the flower because a fully opened tulip was thought to resemble a turban.

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Saturday, April 19, 2008

Seder Plate ke'ara (קערה)

Seder Plate ke'ara (קערה) Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. Seder plate designed by Maurice Ascalon circa 1948 and manufactured by his Pal-Bell Company, Tel-Aviv, Israel. Pal-Bell Seder Plate by Maurice Ascalon circa 1948, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

I Toksook am the owner of the Pal-Bell Mark and all catalogued images of its work, including this image. Ascalon Studios, Inc..

I Toksook, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide.

In case this is not legally possible: I (Toksook) grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Seder Plate

Passover Seder Plate From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Passover Seder Plate Hebrew: ke'ara (קערה) is a special plate containing symbolic foods used by Jews during the Passover Seder. Each of the six items arranged on the plate has special significance to the retelling of the story of the Exodus from Egypt, which is the focus of this ritual meal. The seventh symbolic item used during the meal — a stack of three matzos — is placed on its own plate on the Seder table.

The six traditional items on the Seder Plate are:

* Maror and chazeret — Bitter herbs, symbolizing the bitterness and harshness of the slavery which the Jews endured in Egypt. For maror, many people mix freshly grated horseradish with cooked beets and sugar to make a condiment called chrein. (Note: If the horseradish itself is cooked or pickled, it is not considered valid for the Seder by traditional Jews.) Whole horseradish root can also be eaten. Chazeret is typically romaine lettuce, whose roots are bitter-tasting. Either the horseradish or romaine lettuce may be eaten in fulfillment of the mitzvah of eating bitter herbs during the Seder.

* Charoset — A sweet, brown, pebbly mixture, representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is made from chopped walnuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine. Sephardi recipes call for dates and honey in addition to chopped nuts, cinnamon, and wine. The choice of ingredients reflects the various foods to which Israel is favorably compared in King Solomon's Song of Songs.

* Karpas — A vegetable other than bitter herbs, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. Parsley, celery or boiled potato is usually used. The dipping of a simple vegetable into salt water (which represents tears) mirrors the pain felt by the Jewish slaves in Egypt, who could only eat simple foods. The consumption of the karpas early in the Seder is meant to spark questions from the children at the table. Usually in a Shabbat or holiday meal, the first thing to be eaten after the kiddush over wine is bread. At the Seder table, however, the first thing to be eaten after the kiddush is a vegetable. This leads immediately to the recital of the famous question, Ma Nishtana — "Why is this night different from all other nights?"

* Z'roa — A roasted lamb or goat shankbone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Since the destruction of the Temple, the z'roa serves as a visual reminder of the Pesach sacrifice; it is not eaten or handled during the Seder. Vegetarians often substitute a beet, quoting Pesachim 114b as justification.

* Beitzah — A roasted egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning (as eggs are the first thing served to mourners after a funeral), evoking the idea of mourning over the destruction of the Temple and our inability to offer any kind of sacrifices in honor of the Pesach holiday. Since the destruction of the Temple, the beitzah serves as a visual reminder of the chagigah; it is either not eaten or handled during the Seder or eaten dipped in salt water (which represents tears).

Some Seder gatherings put additional items on the seder plate, also as symbols. For example, some Seders include an orange on the Seder Plate to honor feminism, gay and lesbian rights, rights for marginalized people and Jews, and/or activism . The use of the orange is said to have been inspired by a quote by a conservative rabbi saying a woman belongs on the bimah like an orange belongs on the Seder Plate. However, Susannah Heschel, who claims to have initiated the orange tradition, claims that this story is false.

Many decorative and artistic Seder Plates sold in Judaica stores have pre-formed spaces for inserting the various symbolic foods. According to the Halakha (Jewish law), however, the items must be arranged in the order in which they will be used during the Seder, with the first item to be used placed closest to the leader of the Seder.

The seventh symbolic item on the Seder table is a plate of three whole matzot, which are stacked and separated from each other by cloths or napkins. The middle matzah will be broken and half of it put aside for the afikoman. The top and other half of the middle matzot will be used for the hamotzi (blessing over bread), and the bottom matzah will be used for the korech (Hillel sandwich).

A bowl of salt water, which is used for the two "dippings" of the Seder (once at the beginning of the Seder to dip the karpas, and once before the meal begins to dip a plain, hardboiled egg in remembrance of the chagigah) is not traditionally part of the Seder Plate, but is placed on the table beside it. However, it sometimes is used as one of the six items, omitting chazeret.

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Friday, April 18, 2008

New York City Firemen in Action

New York City Firemen in ActionNew York City Firemen in Action Ladder Company 25 "Pride of the Westside" 205 West 77th St. Seagrave 100' rearmount aerial.

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Thursday, April 17, 2008

Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVIPope Benedict XVI acknowledges guests Wednesday, April 16, 2008, during the arrival ceremony for the Pope on the South Lawn of the White House. Said Pope Benedict XVI during the ceremony, "Mr. President, dear friends, as I begin my visit to the United States, I express once more my gratitude for your invitation, my joy to be in your midst, and my fervent prayers that Almighty God will confirm this nation and its people in the ways of justice, prosperity and peace." White House photo by David Bohrer.
Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

editors note: while no copyright is associated with this image these two points are relevant:
  • Privacy rights protect living people from unauthorized use of their image that is intrusive or embarrassing. As John and Barbara Schultz point out that: “Photographs of private persons, who are not celebrities or public figures, can be published without their consent only in an editorial context. Even editorial use is perilous, however, if any individual who is depicted is held libeled, held up to ridicule, or misrepresented." Picture Research: A Practical Guide, by John Schultz and Barbara Schultz (N.Y.: Van Nostrand, 1991), p. 226. [call number: TR147.S38 1991 P&P]
  • Publicity rights protects a person’s right to benefit from the commercial value connected with an individual’s name, image, or voice. John and Barbara Schultz point out that: " Not all well-known people have a right of publicity, since not all of them profit from the commercialization of their celebrity. Politicians, for instance, do not ordinarily require payment for the use of their images, although they are public figures ... As a rule, the right to publicity is enforced for commercial reproduction of the name or likeness of a celebrity, under the conditions outlined. The editorial use of a photograph of a celebrity, so long as it does not violate other laws concerning libel or slander, requires only the release of the holder of the copyright in the photograph." Picture Research: A Practical Guide, by John Schultz and Barbara Schultz (N.Y.: Van Nostrand, 1991), p. 225-6. [call number: TR147.S38 1991 P&P]

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Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Bethesda Fountain Central Park New York City

<Bethesda Fountain Central Park New York City

Bethesda Fountain Central Park New York City
Bethesda Fountain - The Angel Of The Waters. Emma Stebbins 1815-1882 • USA Gift of New York City THE COMPLETE LISTING OF CENTRAL PARK ATTRACTIONS

Bethesda Fountain rises high above Bethesda Terrace, looking over the hundreds of visitors that come every day to enjoy the view of the Lake and relax at the "heart" of the Central Park.Central Park Attractions - CentralPark.com

On the lower terrace is one of the most photographed fountains in the world, Angel of the Waters. Bethesda Fountain, as it is often called, was the only sculpture commissioned as part of the original design of the Park. Central Park Conservancy : South End
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Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Elijah the Prophet (Eliyahu ha-Navi) Passover Seder

Elijah the Prophet (Eliyahu ha-Navi) being fed by ravens from "Descriptive catalogue of a collection of objects of Jewish ceremonial Objects"

By Cyrus Adler, Immanuel Moses Casanowicz, Ephraim Benguiat, Smithsonian Institution
Published 1901 23 pages Original from Harvard University 1899 Descriptive catalogue of a collection of objects of Jewish ceremonial Objects.

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain In the United States,

This inage however may not be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

Elijah the Prophet (Eliyahu ha-Navi) Passover Seder

Each Passover, a special cup of wine is filled and put on the seder table. During the Seder, the door of the house is opened and everyone stands to allow Elijah the Prophet (Eliyahu ha-Navi) to enter and drink. At every bris, a chair is also set aside for Elijah. At the conclusion of Shabbat, Jews sing about Elijah, hoping he will come "speedily, in our days...along with the Messiah, son of David, to redeem us." - jewishvirtuallibrary.org

This image of Elijah the Prophet Clip Art (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. Works published before 1923, in this case c1320, are now in the public domain.

This image of Elijah the Prophet Clip Art is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from the last day of that year. In this case Pietro Lorenzetti; (c1280 – 1348)

Elijah the Prophet Passover Seder

1 Kings 17 2 Then the word of the Lord came to Elijah: 3 “Leave here, turn eastward and hide in the Kerith Ravine, east of the Jordan. 4 You will drink from the brook, and I have directed the ravens to supply you with food there.”

5 So he did what the Lord had told him. He went to the Kerith Ravine, east of the Jordan, and stayed there. 6 The ravens brought him bread and meat in the morning and bread and meat in the evening, and he drank from the brook

Elijah in the Desert by Washington Allston (1779–1843) editing by sookietex More about this image and story at Public Domain Clip Art - http://publicdomainclip-art.blogspot.com/2008/04/elijah-prophet-eliyahu-ha-navi-passover.html

Each Passover, a special cup of wine is filled and put on the seder table. During the Seder, the door of the house is opened and everyone stands to allow Elijah the Prophet (Eliyahu ha-Navi) to enter and drink.

Monday, April 14, 2008

Azaleas Sping Time flowering shrubs

Azaleas Sping Time flowering shrubs

Azaleas Sping Time flowering shrubs

Azaleas Sping Time flowering shrubs
Azaleas Sping Time flowering shrubs in Central Park, New York City, New York. April 12,2007.

Most gardeners in the Mid Atlantic region take azaleas for granted. They are a fixture in almost every garden and are without doubt the most colorful of all spring blooming shrubs. It's hard to imagine that just half a century ago many of these azaleas were not available to gardeners.

Former U.S. National Arboretum Director Benjamin Y. Morrison knew of the large flowered Indica hybrids that graced gardens in the Gulf Coast states and envisioned the modern hybrid azalea as we know it today. He successfully combined the large flowers and exciting colors of tender azaleas in the Indica group with the hardiness of more northerly species. Morrison did the hybridization work at the Plant Introduction Station in nearby Glenn Dale, MD. The plants were moved to their home on the forested south slopes of Mount Hamilton in 1948.
Every spring, in late April and early May, the Glenn Dale Hillside and the walled Morrison Garden in the Azalea Collection are ablaze with the colorful products of Morrison's work. Whether visiting the Azalea Collection is a spring tradition for you or you haven't visited the collection before, we welcome you to come to the U.S. National Arboretum and experience the breathtaking beauty for yourself. If the azaleas are not in bloom or you can't make the trip, you can see a sampling of the azaleas in this gallery.

Here you will find the flowers of more than 100 of the Glenn Dale azalea varieties. If you want a complete listing of the 454 varieties in the Glenn Dale group of hybrids, visit our Plant Introductions page. The gallery is organized by alphabetical order according to the names of the cultivars represented. Clicking on any thumbnail image will take you to a pop-up image of the azalea featured.

You might find the Azalea Gallery useful in selecting a new azalea to plant in your woodland garden, or you may simply want to pay a visit to spring and its full glory at the U.S. National Arboretum. Enjoy! US National Arboretum Azalea Photo Gallery:

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Sunday, April 13, 2008

Mothers wing (Mother's Day) Currier & Ives

Mothers wing (Mother's Day) Currier & Ives

Mothers wing (Mother's Day) Currier & IvesDigital ID: cph 3b02145 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-54186 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (1,757 kilobytes)
TITLE: Mothers wing, CALL NUMBER: PGA - Currier & Ives--Mothers wing (B size) [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-54186 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication.

MEDIUM: 1 print : lithograph. CREATED, PUBLISHED: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1866. CREATOR: Currier & Ives. NOTES: Artist: Frances F. Palmer.

Currier & Ives : a catalogue raisonné / compiled by Gale Research. Detroit, MI : Gale Research, c1983, no. 4606

FORMAT: Lithographs 1860-1870. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b02145 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b02145 CONTROL #: 2002710589

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-54186]

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Central Park New York City Skyline

Central Park New York City Skyline Sping April 12, 2008.

Image 1. looking southwest from the sheep meadow toward the Time Warner Center twin towers at Columbus Circle. The Trump International building is the black building in foreground.

Image 2. Looking south to Central Park South, 59th street. The Essex House is center with the two thin "ears" at the top. To the viewer's right is the Carnegie Tower built over famed Carnegie Hall.

Image 3. Again to our right we see The Time Warner Towers above Columbus Circle at the junction of 59th street, Central Park West and Broadway. At center we see the "geodesic" like Putnam Building extension. Built over the old Putnam Publishing Building, home to many golden and silver age pulp fiction magazines and now home to Vogue, Harpers and many other "modern" publications.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Central Park New York City Skyline

Central Park New York City Skyline

Central Park New York City Skyline

Friday, April 11, 2008

Lion's Head Gargoyles (chimera)

Lion's Head Gargoyles (chimera)

Lion's Head Gargoyles (chimera)
Lion's Head Gargoyles (chimera) at 82d street and Broadway southeast corner parking garage, New York City, New York.

Architecture, waterspout designed to drain water from the parapet gutter. Originally the term referred only to the carved lions of classical cornices or to terra-cotta spouts, such as those found in the Roman structures at Pompeii. The word later became restricted mainly to the grotesque, carved spouts of the European Middle Ages. It is often, although incorrectly, … gargoyle Britannica Online Encyclopedia

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Denton True (Cy) Young

Denton True (Cy) YoungDigital ID: cph 3b25020 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-77897 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (9 megabytes)
TITLE: [Cy Young, Boston AL, full-length portrait, standing, facing right, throwing baseball] CALL NUMBER: LOT 11147-1 [P&P] Check for an online group record (may link to related items)

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-77897 (b&w film copy neg.) RIGHTS INFORMATION: No known restrictions on publication. MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1908 July 23.

In the world of baseball the name of Cy Young (1867-1955) is synonymous with pitching excellence. At the time of his retirement in 1911 Young had amassed more wins and pitched more innings than any other pitcher - and both records have stood into the 21st century. Denton True (Cy) Young: Biography and Much More from Answers.com:

NOTES: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b25020 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b25020 VIDEO FRAME ID: LCPP003B-25020 (from b&w film copy neg.) CONTROL #: 97518653

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, LC-USZ62-77897]

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Wednesday, April 09, 2008

Magnolia blossoms (Magnolioideae Magnoliaceae)

Magnolia blossoms (Magnolioideae Magnoliaceae)

Magnolia blossoms (Magnolioideae Magnoliaceae)
Magnolia Questions and Answers

Are there many different types of magnolias?

There are about 80 different species of magnolia that are native to the eastern United States and southeastern Asia. Over half of these are in cultivation around the world and many selections and hundreds of named hybrids have been made by breeders seeking better features.

Why should I consider growing magnolias?

Frankly, because they are easy to grow and relatively pest free. Most have large showy flowers and attractive large leaves. Many are evergreen and attractive year round.
There are many great shrub-sized magnolias for the smaller garden.

I have a magnolia that was planted in the wrong spot, and I need to move it. Can this be done?

Magnolias have a very unusual root system. Unlike most other trees and shrubs, the roots are largely unbranched and rope-like. For this reason, magnolias tend to suffer more than many other trees if they are moved after they reach a large size. Most magnolias can safely be moved if the trunk is less than four inches in diameter. If you have time, sever some of the roots one year prior to moving your tree. Cut some of the roots just inside of the the rootball that you intend to dig. The roots will branch and help carry the tree through its establishment period in its new home. When you dig the tree to move it, dig a rootball as wide as you can manage; depth is less important than width since most of the roots are in the top foot of soil. Be sure to mulch your magnolia and water it frequently to keep it moist for the first season after transplanting.

When is the proper time to plant magnolias?

Evergreen magnolias such as southern magnolia, Magnolia grandiflora and sweetbay magnolia, Magnolia virginiana are best planted in early spring. Deciduous magnolias can be planted in autumn or early spring. Autumn is the better time to plant in the south, while northern gardeners should opt for spring planting. Apply some mulch after planting to moderate soil temperatures and moisture conditions.

The southern magnolia is such a large tree for the average home garden. Are there any smaller selections that are available?

Southern magnolia, Magnolia grandiflora, can attain heights of 60 to 80 feet at maturity. The selection 'Bracken's Brown Beauty' matures at 40 feet and is one of the most cold hardy selections. The selection 'Greenback' is a fairly new cultivar to the trade. It has nice, deep green foliage and is said to reach 30 feet at maturity. The most compact cultivar available is 'Little Gem'. It grows almost as a large, dense shrub and matures at 15 to 20 feet high.

Of the yellow-flowering cultivars, which ones seem to have the best color?

To date, the best yellow flowering deciduous magnolias are 'Butterflies' and 'Gold Finch'.

The fruit of the magnolia looks like a cone. Is it actually a cone or what is it?

Although it may look like a cone, it is actually an aggregate fruit that is woody. This flowering structure has changed little over millions of years. Magnolias are some of the most primitive of all flowering plants, but the seeds are enclosed in the fruit during their development, and therefore they must be classified as angiosperms, not as gymnosperms-the group to which conifers belong. As the fruit matures, scale-like areas on it split apart and the seeds, covered in a red fleshy aril, are exposed as they are in gymnosperms.

Do birds like to eat the seed of magnolias?

Yes, songbirds especially like the seed. The seed of a magnolia is surrounded by a brightly colored fleshy aril that is high in fat. This provides migrating birds with a good source of energy as they migrate to the south. Evergreen species of magnolia also provide shelter for birds and wildlife that stay for the winter.

Most magnolia have very large open flowers that are very fragrant. Are those flowers pollinated by bees or butterflies?

Neither! Magnolia flowers are typically pollinated by beetles. Magnolias flowers do not produce nectar but they do produce large quantities of pollen. The pollen is high in protein and the beetles use it for food. There are many different types of beetles that pollinate the various species of magnolias located in southeastern Asia and eastern North America. US National Arboretum

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Tuesday, April 08, 2008

Passover,Washington Haggadah hiddur mitzvah

Passover,Washington Haggadah hiddur mitzvah

The Washington Haggadah (Central Europe, January 29, 1478). Known as the Washington Haggadah because of its presence in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., this manuscript is the Library's most important illuminated Hebrew manuscript. The illustration here depicts the Messiah heralded. It features the Messiah -- or Elijah, the harbinger of the Messiah -- approaching Jerusalem astride a donkey.
The commandment of hiddur mitzvah, which urges one to adorn and beautify the implements of holiness, is the fundamental justification within Judaism for the embellishment, through the ages, of the books, manuscripts, documents, and ritual artifacts of Jewish life.

The Library's most important Hebrew illuminated manuscript is known as the "Washington Haggadah" because of its location in Washington, D.C.

A haggadah (the plural is haggadot) is a liturgical work that is recited in the home at the festive evening meal of Passover, in order to fulfill the biblical injunction (Exodus 13:8) to recount the story of the Exodus to each generation. Haggadot are often illustrated, the theory being that this will keep the children interested and awake during the reciting of the text.

Completed on January 29, 1478, the Washington Haggadah was signed by Joel ben Simeon, a well-known scribe and artist responsible for more than a dozen other Hebrew illuminated manuscripts found in collections around the world. In addition to the full text of the Passover night liturgy, the Washington Haggadah features stunningly intricate illuminated panels and a series of Passover illustrations that include depictions of "The Four Sons," "The Search for Leaven," and "The Messiah Heralded." The enduring popularity of Joel ben Simeon's miniatures is reflected in the many reproductions of his work that have appeared over the years in anthologies of Jewish art and manuscript painting.

In 1991, the Library of Congress published a facsimile edition of the Washington Haggadah, accompanied by a companion volume with a detailed scholarly description, analysis, and assessment of the manuscript. Hebraic Collections: An Illustrated Guide.

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

Monday, April 07, 2008

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis),

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
Canada Goose From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), also referred to as the Canadian Goose, belongs to the Branta genus of geese, which contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey species of the Anser genus. The species name, canadensis, is a New Latin word meaning "of Canada"

The black head and neck with white "chinstrap" distinguish the Canada Goose from all except the Barnacle Goose, but the latter has a black breast, and grey, rather than brownish, body plumage..
There are seven subspecies of this bird, of varying sizes and plumage details, but all are recognizable as Canada Geese. Some of the smaller races can be hard to distinguish from the newly-separated Cackling Goose.

This species is 76-110 cm (30-43 in) long with a 127-180 cm (50-71 in) wing span. Males usually weigh 3.2–6.5 kg, (7–14 pounds), and can be very aggressive in defending territory. The female looks virtually identical but is slightly lighter at 2.5–5.5 kg (5.5–12 pounds), generally are 10% physically smaller than their male counterparts, and has a different honk. An exceptionally large male of the race B. c. maxima, the "giant Canada goose" (which rarely exceed 8 kg/18 lb), weighed 10.9 kg (24 pounds) and had a wingspan of 2.24 m (88 inches). The life span in the wild is 10-24 years.

By the early 20th century, over-hunting and loss of habitat in the late 1800s and early 1900s had resulted in a serious decline in the numbers of this bird in its native range. The Giant Canada Goose subspecies was believed to be extinct in the 1950s until, in 1962, a small flock was discovered wintering in Rochester, Minnesota by Harold Hanson of the Illinois Natural History Survey. With improved game laws and habitat recreation and preservation programs, their populations have recovered in most of their range,

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Hummer SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.
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Sunday, April 06, 2008

Ptolemy (Claudius Ptolemaeus)

Ptolemy (Claudius Ptolemaeus)A medieval artist's rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus.

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.
This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain and also in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) and that most commonly run for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date.

Ptolemy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος; after 83 – 161 CE), known in English as Ptolemy, was an ancient mathematician, geographer, astronomer, and astrologer. He lived in Roman Egypt, and was probably born there in a town in the Thebaid called Ptolemais Hermiou; he died in Alexandria in 161 CE.

Ptolemy was the author of several scientific treatises, three of which would be of continuing importance to later Islamic and European science. The first is the astronomical treatise is now known as the Almagest (in Greek, Η Μεγάλη Σύνταξις, "The Great Treatise", originally Μαθηματικἠ Σύνταξις, "Mathematical Treatise"). The second is the Geography, which is a thorough discussion of the geographic knowledge of the Greco-Roman world. The third is the astrological treatise known as the Tetrabiblos ("Four books") in which he attempted to adapt horoscopic astrology to the Aristotelian natural philosophy of his day.

Beyond his being considered a member of Alexandria's Greek society, few details of Ptolemy's life are known. He wrote in Ancient Greek; some scholars have concluded that Ptolemy was a Greek, and others, a Hellenized Egyptian. He was often known in later Arabic sources as "the Upper Egyptian", suggesting that he may have had origins in southern Egypt. Ptolemy is also known to have used Babylonian astronomical data.

Ptolemy's treatise on astrology, the Tetrabiblos, was the most popular astrological work of antiquity and also enjoyed great influence in the Islamic world and the medieval Latin West. The Tetrabiblos is an extensive and continually reprinted treatise on the ancient principles of horoscopic astrology in four books (Greek tetra means "four", biblos is "book"). That it did not quite attain the unrivalled status of the Almagest was perhaps because it did not cover some popular areas of the subject, particularly electional astrology (interpreting astrological charts for a particular moment to determine the outcome of a course of action to be initiated at that time), and medical astrolog

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Hummer SEE FULL License, Credit and Disclaimer

Click the Image for Ptolemy T-Shirts and Gifts
Click the Image for Ptolemy T-Shirts and Gifts

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Saturday, April 05, 2008

Triumph and Ducati Motorcycles

Motorcycles Triumph and Ducati

Motorcycles Triumph and Ducati
Motorcycles at Spring st. and 155 Avenue of the Americas New York, New York 10013 Corsa Motorsports. Bikes are DUCATI and TRIUMPH.

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If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed,
transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Free Catalogs at www.jpcycles.com

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Friday, April 04, 2008

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images. This website and the information it contains are provided as a public service by the National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Department of the Interior.

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This image or file is a work of a U.S. National Park Service employee, taken or made as part of that person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF. from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Martin Luther King Jr. Tomb

Martin Luther King Jr. TombDescription: Martin Luther King, Jr. & Coretta Scott King. Source: own-work (Simon J. Kurtz) Date: 08/11/2007. Author: Simon J. Kurtz. Permission: (Reusing this image) Granted to the public domain.

Licensing: I, the copyright holder (Simon J. Kurtz) of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible: I (Simon J. Kurtz) grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

In early 1968, King was devoting much of his time to recruiting for the Poor People's Campaign, when the Reverend James Lawson of Memphis, Tennessee, asked him to support a strike of black sanitation workers in that city. The sanitation workers had walked out in February 1968, because city officials refused to recognize their nearly all-black local of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The Community on the Move for Equality (COME) organization was formed to support the strikers. King was largely unaware of divisions within the Memphis black community between established clergy and NAACP officials and young Black Power adherents.

On March 18, King addressed a rally of fifteen thousand strikers and supporters in Memphis. Ten days later, King led a march that turned violent. A small minority of demonstrators began looting, and police attacked both looters and peaceful demonstrators. Deeply alarmed by the eruption of violence, King vowed to return to Memphis and conduct a wholly peaceful march to vindicate his nonviolent beliefs.

King arrived in Memphis on Wednesday, April 3, 1968, for talks with participants in a new march scheduled for Monday, April 8. Aides described King as depressed as a result of the violence that marked the previous march and the difficulties the SCLC was experiencing recruiting for the Poor People's Campaign. On Wednesday evening King addressed a small rally at the Memphis Mason Temple. The next evening, April 4, 1968, King was assassinated while standing on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Motel. Blacks and whites alike reacted with sorrow and anger to King's murder. Rioting in 110 American cities left thirty-nine dead in the days following King's death. Escaped convict James Earl Ray was tried and convicted of murdering King, although the question of whether Ray acted alone is still debated. The Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy succeeded King as president of the SCLC. Abernathy went ahead with the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, but failed to accomplish the campaign's goals.

King's body was flown to Atlanta, where it lay in state at Sisters Chapel of Spelman College. On April 9, 1968, Ralph Abernathy, who had been with King since the Montgomery bus boycott days, conducted his funeral service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Prominent civil rights leaders, black entertainers and professional athletes, and the four leading presidential contenders—Senator Eugene McCarthy, Senator Robert Kennedy, Vice President Hubert Humphrey, and Richard Nixon—attended the service. A crowd exceeding sixty thousand listened to the service over loudspeakers outside, and as many as fifty thousand joined in the funeral cortege from Ebenezer to the campus of Morehouse College. King's casket was borne on a farm cart drawn by two mules, symbolic of the Poor People's Campaign. At Morehouse, college president emeritus Benjamin Mays gave a brief eulogy before King was buried next to his grandparents at South View Cemetery.

King's widow, Coretta Scott King, founded the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change in order to carry on her husband's work and honor his memory. She purchased property on Auburn Avenue east of Ebenezer Baptist Church for this purpose. King's remains were moved to a commemorative site at the Center in 1971. The King Center complex was completed in 1981 and includes King's marble tomb and surrounding plaza, a library and archive, conference center, and exhibit areas. Martin Luther King, Jr.