Thursday, February 15, 2007

Happy Saint Patrick's Day

+sookie tex. Happy Saint Patrick's Day, St. Patrick. Public Domain ClipArt Stock Photos and Images.

Privacy and Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service.

The Defense Visual Information Directorate. Information presented on DoD Imagery Server is considered public information.

except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

About Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

Happy Saint Patrick's Day

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Saint Patrick's Day, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Saint Patrick's Day (Irish: Lá 'le Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig), colloquially - but to some a derogatory term - Paddy's Day, is the feast day which annually celebrates Saint Patrick (386-493), the patron saint of Ireland, on March 17. It is the national holiday and one of the public holidays in the Republic of Ireland (a bank holiday in Northern Ireland); the overseas territory of Montserrat; and the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

The person who was to become St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, was born in Wales about AD 385. His given name was Maewyn, and he almost didn't get the job of bishop of Ireland because he lacked the required scholarship. Far from being a saint, until he was 16, he considered himself a pagan. At that age, he was sold into slavery by a group of Irish marauders that raided his village. During his captivity, he became closer to God. He escaped from slavery after six years and went to Gaul where he studied in the monastery under St. Germain, bishop of Auxerre for a period of twelve years. During his training he became aware that his calling was to convert the pagans to Christianity.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Saint Patrick's Day.

1 comment:

Gerry said...

Quite an informative blog, loved reading drop by my blog too.

Post a Comment